History of Milwaukee Biographies

Nearly 4000 biographical sketches of pioneers and citizens
The Western Historical Company, Chicago
A.T. Andreas Proprietor, 1881

Biographies

 

DANIEL R. GALEHER

Proprietor of Cream City Carriage Works at No.121 Clybourn street, Milwaukee, was born in Manchester, New York, July 13, 1834, and went to Toronto, Canada, in 1849, being apprenticed as carriage painter for four years. At the close of his apprenticeship, he traveled through the Southern and Western States, and in May, 1857, came to Milwaukee, and was engaged by the La Crosse Railroad Company, working at his trade in their shop for about six years, then taking charge of the engine painting of the Prairie du Chien Division for two years and a half. In 1865, Mr. Galeher bought the interest of the painting department of Wechselberg & Bros'. novelty carriage works, and in 1869 established his carriage works on Clybourn street, adjoining his present place of business. He has employed from five to sixteen men in the seasons.

Source: History of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, The Western Historical Company, Chicago; A.T. Andreas Proprietor, 1881 pg. 1523

 

EDWARD GIESELER

pharmacist and apothecary, No. 767 Third Street was born in Louisiana, November 7, 1956, and remained in that State until 12 years old. In the year 1868 he came to Milwaukee and in this city supplemented the educational faciliities which had been afforded him in his native place. For one year he was a student in the German and English Academy, after which he completed his literacy training in the High School of the city. After leaving High School, the young man served in a three years apprenticeship from 1870 with Otto Thiele, the druggist, clerking for his old employer two years after his term had expired while preparing for his graduation from the College of Pharmacy in Chicago in 1877. In the month of January, 1878, the young druggist commenced business on his own account, opening at the time the store which he has since occupied, at the address given above.

Source: History of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, The Western Historical Company, Chicago; A.T. Andreas Proprietor, 1881 pg. 1043

 

CHARLES GELHAAR

Charles Gelhaar, mason, No. 640 Twelfth street, was born May 5, 1825, in Ludwigsruh, Germany. He came to America in July, 1857, and to Milwaukee in August of that same year. He commenced work at the mason's trade, which he has followed since that time, the last fifteen years engaged in business for himself. He ia amember of the Harugari. He was married to Miss Amelia Winkle, a native of Gross Fahlenwader, Germany, born in 1827. They have six sons and four daughters, which are as follows: Albert, born in Gross Fahlenwader, Germany, March 4, 1852; Ida P.E., born November 14, 1853; Robert C.A., born September 3, 1855; Chas A.R., born February 18, 1857; Otto C.R., an architect, born October 18, 1858, in Milwaukee commenced contracting in 1880; Emil J., born april 24, 1860, in Milwaukee; Emma E. M., born December 2 ,1861; Bertha E.H., born March 24, 1864; Amanda A.Z., born April 24, 1867, and Theodore Gelhaar, born April 7, 1871.

Source: History of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, The Western Historical Company, Chicago; A.T. Andreas Proprietor, 1881, pg. 1507

 

EMIL GEORGE

The following was under the Painters, Ornamenters, etc section.

EMIL GEORG was born in Switzerland in 1846. He came to America in the Fall of 1862, and located in New York, where he remained a short time, then went to Ohio. He enlisted from Toledo in 1863, to serve one year in the One Hundred and Thirtieth Ohio Infantry. He served the full term, participating in all the battles of the regiment, and was honorably discharged at the close of the war. He learned his trade in Toledo, and came to this city in 1867. He has remained here and worked at his trade ever since. He was married in 1867 to Miss Margaret Schwiebenger. They have six children.

Source: History of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, The Western Historical Company, Chicago; A.T. Andreas Proprietor, 1881, pg. 1536.

 

JOHN S. GEORGE

JOHN S. GEORGE, General Agent of the Chicago & Northwestern Railway Company, is a native of Watertown, N.Y. He came West in 1869, and became connected with the above corporation at Chicago. From thence he went to Watertown, Wis., as agent, and then to Cedar Rapids, Ia. He has represented the company in Milwaukee since 1873.

Source: History of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, The Western Historical Company, Chicago; A.T. Andreas Proprietor, 1881, pg. 1386

 

ASEL E. GERRED

conductor, La Crosse Division, was born in Erie County, Penn., in 1832; came with his family to Wisconsin in 1845; settled near Beaver Dam; learned carpenter's trade at Beaver Dam and worked at it a number of years; helped to build the first bridge on the old La Crosse Railroad; commenced railroading in 1861 as brakeman on the Milwaukee & La Crosse Railroad; worked in that capacity till the Fall of 1863, when he was made conductorr freight; moved from BEaver Dam to Rubicon at this time; made his home at that place till 1868, when he moved to Portage City. In 1874 he moved to Milwaukee; has been in the employ of the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railway Company, under its different administrations, twenty years; has never had any bad luck of consequence. Resides at No. 626 Hill street.

Source: History of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, The Western Historical Company, Chicago; A.T. Andreas Proprietor, 1881

 

THEODORE WILLIAM GIESE

engineer, South Milwaukee yards, was born in Prussia in 1836, came to Milwaukee in 1853; commenced with the Milwaukee & Prairie du Chien Railway, in 1856, as fireman; served in that capacity till 1860, and was then employed as dispatcher till 1865, when he began as engineer; has been in the employ of the road, under its different managements, twenty-four years, and has met with no serious accident. Resides at No. 459 Fourth street.

Source: Milwaukee, Wisconsin, The Western Historical Company, Chicago; A.T. Andreas Proprietor, 1881, pg. 1362

 

LOUIS GLAUBITZ

junior member of above firm, who became a partner in the Fall of 1879, was previously connected for many years with the Durand houses, both in Chicago and in this city. He is a native of Germany, married there in 1854, and in 1856 emigrated to America, settling in Chicago. His family consists of a wife and eight children, the two oldest a son and daughter, married and settled in this city. Family residence, 711 Walnut street.

Source: History of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, The Western Historical Company, Chicago; A.T. Andreas Proprietor, 1881, pg. 1190)  

J. GORMLY

patternmaker, No. 58 Second street, was born in 1824 in County Roscommon, Ireland. He came to America when only five years old with his parents. Mr. Gormly was married in 1847, to Miss Mary G. Loomis, a native of New York. He came to Milwaukee in May, 1849; has always followed the trade of patternmaking and carving.

Source: History of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, The Western Historical Company, Chicago; A.T. Andreas Proprietor, 1881, pg. 1314

 

GRAF & MADLENER

proprietors of the South Side White Beer Brewery and soda water manufactory, No. 530 National avenue; business established May 1, 1874, on the corner of Grove and National avenue; removed to the present location in 1877. The business amounts to about $15,000 a year, and some twelve hands are employed.

John Graf, the senior member of the firm, was born in Milwaukee in 1852; has never been engaged in any other business. Resides at No. 530 National avenue.

Phillip Madlener was born in Bavaria, in 1843; came direct to Milwaukee in 1869; is a coppersmith by trade, and worked at the same until commencing the present business.

Source: History of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, The Western Historical Company, Chicago; A.T. Andreas Proprietor, 1881, pg. 1473

 

A.F. GRAHAM

A.F. GRAHAM, Freight Agent of the Milwaukee, Lake Shore & Western Railroad, is a native of New York State and was born March 18, 1846. His parents came West to the State the same year, and he received his education here, beginning railroading in 1866 with the Milwaukee & St. Paul Railroad; remained with that company until 1872, when he accepted his present position; was the first agent of this company and made out the first way-bill. Mr. Graham is Master of Independence Lodge No. 80, this city.

See also Milwaukee, Lake Shore & Western Railroad in the Transportation/Railroad section
Source: History of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, The Western Historical Company, Chicago; A.T. Andreas Proprietor, 1881, pg. 1398-1402

 

C.A. GREEN

C. A. GREEN, collecting agent, is a native of Jefferson County, N. Y. He came West to Wisconsin in 1852; settled in Monroe County, where he held the offices of Supervisor and Constable for several years. He came to this city in 1872.

Source: History of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, The Western Historical Company, Chicago; A.T. Andreas Proprietor, 1881, pg. 1658

 

AUG. GREULICH & SON

wholesale wines and liquors, Nos. 342, 344 and 346 Fourth street. Business established July 4, 1860, by Aug. Greulich and Julius Kersting, under the firm name of Aug. Greulich Co. Mr. Kersting died in Switzerland in 1868, when the business was conducted by Aug. Greulich alone until January 1, 1870, when Andrew F. Greulich was admited as a partner, since which time the firm name has been as above.

AUGUST GREULICH, senior member of the firm, was born in Baden, Germany, August 3, 1813. Came to America in 1834, and to Milwaukee in 1841. First landed in New York, and from there went to Boston, where he remained about nine months. Left Boston and went to Cleveland, Ohio, remaining a short time; then went to Detroit, where he lived six years. Had followed the butcher's business up to this time. In 1842 he purchased a farm in Racine County, and lived on the same until 1844. In the latter year returned to Milwaukee, and engaged in merchandising. IN 1845 entered into partnership and H. Haertel in a general store, the firm being Greulich & Haertel. This continued until 1851, when the firm was dissolved, Mr. Greulich buying an interest in the See Bote newspaper, and of which he became general manager. Continued until 1860, when he sole out his interest in the See Bote, and started in the present business as stated. Mr. Greulich was a member of the first STate Legislature in 1848; and in 1856 was again a member of the Assembly. In 1857 and 1858 was in the Senate. Has been about ten years a member of the City Council, and part of the time a member of the Board of Supervisors. Has also been a member of the School Board for two years, and for over twenty years has been one of the Board of Managers of the St. Emelianus Orphan Asylum. Mr. Greulich, as will be seen by the foregoing imperfect sketch, has been highly respected by his fellow-citizens; and during all the years of his public life, and had an eye to the best interests of the city.

ANDREW F. GREULICH, son of August Greulich, and a member of the firm, was born in Detroit, Michigan, August 8, 1840. After completing his education, and traveling in Europe for about two years, returned to Milwaukee and wet to work assisting his father in the business continuing the same until 1870, when he became a member of the firm.

Source: Milwaukee, Wisconsin, The Western Historical Company, Chicago; A.T. Andreas Proprietor, 1881, pg. 1476

 

JOHN GROOTEMAAT

proprietors of the "Wind Grist-mill," on the Green Bay Road. Born in Holland in 1812. He learned the trade of miller and wheelwright in his native land. He came to America in 1847 and lived three years in New York, coming to Milwaukee in 1850, when he established his present business. He runs three run of stone, one for wheat and rye, one for feed, and one for pearled barley. The family are members of the Presbyterian Dutch Reform Church.Source: History of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, The Western Historical Company, Chicago; A.T. Andreas Proprietor, 1881, pg. 1185

 

REV. CHRISTIAN G. HAACK

Pastor of the Evangelical Peace Church, was born in Prussia, in 1830; was educated in Barmen, Germany at the Rheinish Mission Seminary; preached some while studying in the old country; came to the United States 1856, and settled in Keokuk County, Iowa; was ordained in December, 1856; remained in charge till August, 1864, when he located in Princeton, Ill. In November, 1871, he came to Milwaukee and has since that date ad charge of the Evangelical Peace Church. Rev. Haack married in 185 Mary Krohnke, who died in Milwaukee, April 27, 1872, leaving four children all now living in this city. He is President of the Sixth District of the German Evangelical Synod of North America; is also President of the Relief Association of his district. He was married to his present wife November 5, 1873. Her name was Hellena Becker, formerly of Germany. They have three children. He is a devoted pastor and his Church is prosperous.

Source: History of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, The Western Historical Company, Chicago; A.T. Andreas Proprietor, 1881, pg. 946

 

THEODORE HABHEGGER

Manufacturer of carriages, buggies, sleighs, etc., at No. 568 Market street, was born in Switzerland, May 31, 1830. He came to America and located in Milwaukee in July 1849.; commenced learning the blacksmith and wheelwright trade with J. Kingsley, remaining with him six years. In 1856 he bought the interest of his employer and entered into partnership with George Heckler. They continued the partnership twenty years when, in 1876, Mr. Habhagger went into business for himself; buying the lot where he is now located, and built a good two-story, brick shop with basement, 30x40 feet. He uses the business for storing his stock and lumber.

Source: History of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, The Western Historical Company, Chicago; A.T. Andreas Proprietor, 1881, pg. 1525

 

LOUIS HAGENDORFF

Louis Hagendorff, photographer, was born in 1848 in Hamburg, Germany. After completing his studies in the high school of that city, he began the study of photography at the age of sixteen, serving a three-years apprenticeship with W. Breuning of Hamburg; he continued the profession in various parts of Europe until 1869 and then emigrated to America, locating the same year in Milwaukee. He was first in the employ of Hugo Von Broich until 1876, when he formed a co-partnership with Messrs. Schmitz & Witt and opened a studio on Reed street, which firm was later changed to Will, Schroeder & Hagendorff. They then conducted two studios, one at No. 359 third, and this one at No. 164 Reed street. Mr Witt withdrawing in 1877, the other two members of the firm continued until March, 1878, when they dissolved, Mr. Hagendorff taking the studio on Reed street and Mr. Schroeder the one on Third street.

Source: History of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, The Western Historical Company, Chicago; A.T. Andreas Proprietor, 1881, pg. 1544

 

MILWAUKEE MINING COMPANY

This is in the Bay View History area of the book:

Menominee Mining Company operates the Vulcan, Cyclops, Norway, Quinnesee, and the Chapin and Florence Iron Mines in the Menominee range.  The capital stock, according to the charter of 1877, is nominally $100,000, but the actual capital invested is greatly in excess of that amount,  The annual output of iron ore is 430,000 tons, which is chiefly disposed of to Ohio and Pennsylvania furnace men.  1,800 men are employed in the operations of the above mines.  Office, 86 Michigan streets

J.J. HAGERMAN, was born in Port Hope, Canada West, march 23, 1837.  When he was five years old his father moved to St. Clair County, Michigan,, where he run for many years a flouring mill and machine shop.  here young Hagerman remained until he was nineteen years old, acquiring industrious habits, his primary schooling as an engineer and machinist, and, through such educational advantages as the schools of the small town where his parents lived afforded, fitted himself for a college course.  he graduated in the scientific course of the University of Michigan in 1861.  He worked himself through college by acting as clerk on various steamboats owned by Capt. E.B. Ward, during the Summer months of the years while he was pursing his collegiate studies.  After leaving college he entered the employ of Capt. Ward and remained with him in various capacities until the organization of the Milwaukee Iron Company in 1866, when Mr. Ward being largely interested in the new company, he came to Milwaukee and took the responsible position of Secretary, which office he continued to hold until after the death of Capt. Ward in 1875, when he was elected president of the company.  The history of his connection with the works at Bay View appears in the sketch of the Milwaukee Iron Company, given elsewhere in this chapter.  He was more closely identified with the development of the business, the completion and operating of the works, and the building up of the village than any other person connected with the enterprise.

After the failure of the works and their transfer to other hands, Mr. Hagerman, J.H. Van Dyke, A. Conro and their associates organized the Menominee Mining Company, of which he has been the President and a large stockholder since its formation.  This company since its formation has constantly increased its business and is now mining more iron ore than any other company in the world.  The mines are on the Michigan peninsula, where three thousand miners are employed.  Much of the time the work is carried on night and day.  The central office is in Milwaukee, where Mr. Hagerman and the other principal stockholders reside.  Mr. Hagerman married Miss Anna H. Osborne, of Tucumiseh, Michigan in 1867.  They have two children, Percy and Herbert J. Hagerman.

JOHN C. PARKES, Superintendent of the works, was born in 1831, and came to America with his parents when a child.  He has been engaged in the iron business, identified with the same, since his boyhood, except about eleven years which he spent in the gold mines in California.  After leaving New York, he resided in Pennsylvania, Virginia, Ohio, Illinois and Wisconsin, traveling over nearly every State in the Union.  He has been connected with the North Chicago Rolling mills Company since 1864; was superintendent of their works in Chicago until march, 1878; then came to Bay View, since which time he has held his present position.

WM. B. PARKES, Superintendent of the merchant mill department, is a brother to J.C. Parkes of the same establishment, and also a native of Ulster County, New York.  He was born in Saugerties in 1838, was in the iron business with his father in his boyhood and has followed it ever since; came to Milwaukee in 1868 and was connected with the Milwaukee Iron company until their failure; since 1878 has been in the present position.

Source: History of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, The Western Historical Company, Chicago; A.T. Andreas Proprietor, 1881, pg. 1619

 

JOHN E. HAGGERTY

conductor of the La Crosse Division, was born in Watertown, Wisconsin, in 1860. When only 13 years of age, he began as brakeman on the division on which he is now employed; continued to serve as brakeman till the Spring of 1880, when he was promoted to condutor. Up to the present time he has been an employe of the cmpany eight years continuously. He has never met with an accident of importance. Residence Watertown, Wis; board at No. 312 Grove street.

Source: History of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, The Western Historical Company, Chicago; A.T. Andreas Proprietor, 1881

 

GEORGE HAMBACH

George Hambach, proprietor of meat market at No. 239 Broadway, was born in GermanySeptember 23, 1833, and came to Milwaukee in 1856, establishing his businessin 1860.

Source: History of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, The Western Historical Company, Chicago; A.T. Andreas Proprietor, 1881, pg. 1232

 

JOHN HANNAN

JOHN HANNAN, boots and shoes, No 172 Broadway; born 1835, in >>Franklin County, N.Y. In 1845 he came with his parents to Dodge >>County, Wisconsin. In 1852 he came to Milwaukee and learned his trade with Bradley & Metcalf; also worked for them about twenty >>years. In 1878 he commenced his present business. He married >>Marcella Saunders in 1854; she was born in Ireland. They have five children--four sons and one daughter.

Source: History of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, The Western Historical Company, Chicago; A.T. Andreas Proprietor, 1881, pg. 1452

 

JACOB HAMM

JACOB HAMM, groceries and provisions, flour and feed, No. 1129 Chestnut street. He was born in Washington County, and followed farming till 1873, when he established this business; commenced in a small way, and by attention to business, has built up a large and flourishing trade. His first dealt in flour and feed only. Source: History of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, The Western Historical Company, Chicago; A.T. Andreas Proprietor, 1881, pg. 1198

 

A. HANKE

A. Hanke & Brother, proprietors of meat market, Nos. 12 and 14 Chestnut street; established this business in 1875, which is about $150,000 a year extent.

Source: History of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, The Western Historical Company, Chicago; A.T. Andreas Proprietor, 1881, pg. 1232

 

THEODORE O. HARTMAN

Theo. O. Hartman, Insurance agent, No. 144 Clinton street. This agency was established August 10, 1868 by Mr. Hartman. After five years he took in Charles Torpfer, as partner, the firm being then known as Hartman & Co. THe co-partnership continued until the death of MR. Torpfer, which was in 1875/ The business was then conducted by Mr. Hartman alone. When he first commenced business he only represented one company, the MIlwaukee Mechanics' Mutual Fire Insurance Company, and was doing only a small business of but $3,500 per year. It has gradually increased until he now represents the Milwaukee Mechanics' Mutual, the Buffalo German of Buffulo, New York, and the Newark City of Newark, New Jersey, the combined assets of which are $4,500,000. The above shows the stability of the agency.

Theodore O. Hartman was born February 23, 1842, in Saxony, Germay. HE came to Milwaukee with his parents August 1, 1847. His father Charles E. and his mother Johanna, are still living in Milwaukee. Mr. Hartman commenced work at the shoemakers trade in 1853. In the Spring of 1863 he volunteered to fight for his country as a private in Company E Fourth Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry. He served nearly three years and was then mustered out. He participated in the Battle of Port Hudson and the Battle of Mobile Landing. He came out Quarter-Master Sergeant of the Company. He was soon after appointed STate AGent of the State Board of Immigration, which office he held two years. He is now County Agent having been elected in 1878 and holds the office two years from January 1879.

Source: History of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, The Western Historical Company, Chicago; A.T. Andreas Proprietor, 1881, pg. 1110

 

CHARLES S. HAYDEN

CHARLES S. HAYDEN, Chief Train Dispatcher, was born in Brandford, Canada, in 1855. When 3 years of age moved with his parents to Cleveland, Ohio; resided there two years and then moved to Troy, New York, where they lived one year and then moved to Beloit, Wisconsin. Mr. Hayden learned telegraphing with the Chicago & Northwestern Railway, commencing in 1870, at Beloit; was with this company about a year, when he engaged with the Western Union Railway, now a division of the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railway, as operator at Freeport, Illinois; next at Springfield, and then at Racine Junction, in all about two years. AT the expiration of that time he resumed work with the Chicago & Northwestern Railway, as operator at Kenosha. From Kenosha he transferred to Chicago, and from there to the ticket office of the company at Milwaukee. In June, 1875, he severed his connection with the Northwester road and engaged with the Milwaukee, Lake Shore & Western Railroad as train dispatcher, with headquarters at Milwaukee. He held that position to this date, April, 1881. Resides at 137 Fifth street.

See also Milwaukee, Lake Shore & Western Railroad in the Transportation/Railroad section
Source: History of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, The Western Historical Company, Chicago; A.T. Andreas Propr  

WINFRED HAYDEN

proprietor of the Live Oak House which was established seventeen years ago. She is a native of Buffalo, New York, where she was educated and lived with her parents until November 23, 1857, when she married. In 1860 she came to this city. The first few years of her life in this city were attended with many hardships and reverses, but through her persevering industry she has accumulated a competency. She is a member of St. Gall's Church and St. John's Cathedral.

Source: History of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, The Western Historical Company, Chicago; A.T. Andreas Proprietor, 1881, pg. 1488

 

CHARLES H. HAYES

was born in Brooklyn, N.Y., in February 1855; came West to Chicago early in 1874; engaged as an employe of the Alton & St. Louis Railroad Company; remained with this company till the fall of 1874; when he commenced work in the Spring of 1875 on the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railway, as brakeman on the Chicago and La Crosse Divison on a through passenger train. He continued int his capacity unitl the spring of 1878, when he returned to Brooklyn, and engaged as conductor on the Prospect Park and Coney Island Railroad; returned to Milwaukee in the fall of that year, and resumed work iwht the Chicago, Milwaukee, & St. Paul. He continued in the company's employ till February, 1881, when he left the road to accept a situation as commercial traveler for Keller, Strum & Co., of Chicago.

Source: History of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, The Western Historical Company, Chicago; A.T. Andreas Proprietor, 1881

 

T.J. HAYNES

Manufacturer and dealer in currier's stuffing, Vogel's Island, in the Eighth Ward. In June, 1972, Mr. Haynes established his business and commenced the manufacture of a patent steam compound clarified leather stuffing for the use of curriers. The process of extracting oil from leather stuffing was invented and patented by John Rust of Peabody, Mass. The material used is the "whitenings" taken from the flesh side of the leather to prepare its surface for color. The material is placed is a "steeper" with a perforated bottom to admit the passage of steam, which being condensed in the vessel extracts a part of the oil; in order to secure this, it is subjected to a steaming of from fifteen to thirty minutes, varying according to the material used. This process extracting but a portion of the oil, the material is passed into a cylindrical receiver, and subjected to a pressure of forty tons for about thirty minutes, which extracts the remaining oil. The third processes is to clarify the extracted oil, requiring about twenty-four hours. It is then drawn off and barreled, and is ready for market. During the first and second processes the material is reduced at least five-sixths in bulk, and after being dried is used for fuel. The first year after establishing the factory, Mr. Haynes manufactured one hundred barrels. IN 1880 the manufacture had increased to 500. Mr. Haynes owns a similar establishment in Georgetown, Mass. The extent of his business is limited only by the amount of material that can be procured.

Source: History of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, The Western Historical Company, Chicago; A.T. Andreas Proprietor, 1881, p. 1442

 

JOSEPH HELLER

Joseph Heller, dealer in dry goods and groceries, Nos. 417 and 419 Mitchell street; business established in the Spring of 1871. He commenced with a small stock of about $300, and now carries a stock valued at $3,000. Mr. Heller was born in Prussia, January 11, 1846. He came to America, October 31, 1866, and settled in Milwaukee. He followed his trade as mason, which he had learned in his native land, for sixteen years. He was married in September, 1868, to Miss P. Powinska, of Milwaukee.

Source: History of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, The Western Historical Company, Chicago; A.T. Andreas Proprietor, 1881, pg. 1263

 

LEONARD HERBST

LEONARD HERBST, proprietor of meat market at No. 428 Beaubian street, was born in Town of Granville, Milwaukee County, and commenced his present business in 1875. He was married in September, 1873, to Miss Elizabeth Simon, a native of Mequon, Ozaukee County, Wis. They have four children-two sons and two daughters. pg 1232

 

LAWRENCE HERSCHEDE

with Jacob Fernekes, is a native of Prussia. In 1846 he came to Milwaukee with his mother. They settled on a farm seven miles from Milwaukee; lived there two years, then removed to the city, and at once commenced to learn the confectionery business with Henry Miller; worked there about four years. He then commenced work for his brother and brother-in-law who had started this business; continued with them about ten years. He then went to Green Bay, Wisconsin, where he remained about three years; returned to Milwaukee, worked for Johnson & Bros. about ten years. IN 1877 he engaged with this present firm; married January 22, 1861, to Lizzie Yuenger. She was born in Prussia. They have seven children, three daughters and four sons.

Source: History of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, The Western Historical Company, Chicago; A.T. Andreas Proprietor, 1881, pg. 1212

 

LYDIA ELY HEWITT

Women in the War

LYDIA ELY HEWITT is a daughter of the late Ambrose Ely, one of the early and respected settlers in Milwaukee. She was born in Michigan in 1836, and came to Milwaukee with her father and mother and only sister in 1840, the journey being made in an emigrant wagon, all the way from Indiana, in which State the family had lived a few months, previous to coming to Wisconsin. She was educated in the common and select schools of Milwaukee. In early life she evinced precocious talent for drawing, and under the indifferent tuition of teachers not above mediocrity, her tastes in that direction developed into a ruling passion. She was married in 1852, to Gideon P. Hewitt. Till the breaking out of the Rebellion, in 1861, her life was that of other cultured women of energy, taste and refinement, intensified somewhat by her passion for art. During these years she received instruction in drawing and painting from Alexander Marquis, a modest and conscientious painter, who is remembered by many residents of Milwaukee as an artist of merit. At the beginning of the war she put aside her brush and pencil, and till long after its close devoted her whole life and energy to the task of alleviating the suffering of the soldiers in the field, and providing them with a permanent home after the war was over. She was one of the first directors of the East Side Soldiers' Aid Society, and on the organization of the West Side Society was chosen President. She held this office uninterruptedly for four years; until the war was over, and the work of the institution had culminated in the securing of a home for every disabled Wisconsin Soldier, so long as one shall survive. The work of Mrs. Hewitt during these years was constant. IN cooperation with a few persistent, enthusiastic and talented women like herself, she not only conducted the Milwaukee Home, but provided for its support by constantly varied, and newly invented schemes for the furnishing of supplies and money, the details of which often required equal attention and as arduous labor as the management of the "Home" itself. The preliminary work needed to insure the success of the Soldiers' Home Fair was performed by a ladies' committee, of which she was the chairman. In this capacity she, with Mrs. Olin, Mrs. Aikens, and others, visited the important towns and cities of the State and by their appeals aroused and enlisted the sympathies of the whole State in behalf of the enterprise. The history of the women's work in Milwaukee, which appears elsewhere this volume, is, in a peculiar manner, the record of Mrs. Hewitt's life during those years, as she devoted herself unreservedly and entirely to the work. To her rare executive ability, her fertility in resources, and her untiring efforts, the grand results are in a large measure attributable. Having completed her labors in behalf of the soldiers, for which she is entitled to their last gratitude, she returned to her art studies and renewed ardor, and has pursued them to the present time. She has attained an enviable reputation as a painter of landscapes and portraits. Many of her works adorn the homes of the most fastidious sand intelligent art connoisseurs of the West, and are ranked by them in value and artistic excellence with those of the best American artists. She has visited Florida twice, and the mountain regions of Colorado twice, bringing back rare sketches which she has wrought into finished work in her studio. She is still a resident of Milwaukee, diligently and patiently working with brush and pencil awaiting as she may with confidence, the tardy but sure commendation, which shall be commensurate with the merits of her life work.

Source: History of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, The Western Historical Company, Chicago; A.T. Andreas Proprietor, 1881, pg. 809

 

W. HILLER

proprietor of Williams' House, No 1011 Winnebago street. Mr. Hiller was born in Prussia. He came to New York City in 1852, and soon after went to Burlington, Iowa; remaining there but a short time, he went to St. Louis, Missouri, where he engaged in the shoe trade for twelve years. He was then in Chicago for six months, and in 1865, came to Milwaukee and engaged in his present business. Mr. Hiller owns the Williams' House, and has acquired his property since coming to Milwaukee.

Source: History of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, The Western Historical Company, Chicago; A.T. Andreas Proprietor, 1881, pg. 1488

 

MICHAEL HILTY

Michael Hilty foot of tenth street, corner of Fowler, successor to Sands & Hilty, dealer in lumber, lath and shingles; bill stuff cut to order. The yard was established by Louis Sands and Michael Hilty in 1873. In 1879 Mr. Hilty bought Mr. Sand's interest. The annual sales amount to abotu $150,000; and stock comes principally from Michigan pineries, Muskegon, Manistee and Ludington.

Source: History of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, The Western Historical Company, Chicago; A.T. Andreas Proprietor, 1881, pg. 1505

 

HINTZE & MCLAUGHLIN's

restaurant and oyster house, fine wines and liquors, No. 410 East Water street. The business was established by C.F.A. Hintze, July 1, 1874. January 1, 1876, M.J. McLaughlin was admited as a partner, since which time the business has been conducted uner the firm name of Hintze & McLaughlin.

Source: History of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, The Western Historical Company, Chicago; A.T. Andreas Proprietor, 1881, pg. 1485

CHARLES F.A. HINTZE senior member of the above firm, was born in Plevnow, near Greifenberg, March 6, 1844; came with is parents to Milwaukee in January, 1858. Since completing his education he has been engaged in his present business.

Source: History of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, The Western Historical Company, Chicago; A.T. Andreas Proprietor, 1881, pg. 1486

M.J. MCLAUGHLIN of the above firm, was born in Ireland in 1844; came to Milwaukee with his parents in 1847. Engaged in his present business in 1876. Was elected member of the Board of Supervisors in 1876, reelected in 1877.

Source: History of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, The Western Historical Company, Chicago; A.T. Andreas Proprietor, 1881, pg. 1486

 

CLARENCE E. HOBBS

Engineer, was born in Prompton, Pa; came to Wisconsin and to Milwaukee with his parents while quite young; commenced work for the Watertown & Beloit Valley Railroad in 1858; May 9, 1861, he enlisted on the call for three months men; in Company K, First Wisconsin Volunteers; served three months then returned to Milwaukee, engaging with teh Milwaukee & Prairie du Chien Railroad Company as fireman; served in the positon only eight months, when he enlisted in Company D, Twenty-fourth Wisconsin Volunteers, August 8, 1862; served three years and was mustered out June 22, 1865. His father, F.S. HObbs, and his brother, A.J. were both soldiers in the late war, serving three years. Both were wounded. The father held a Captain's commission. On his return ot Milwaukee, C.E. Hobbs, engaged with the Milwaukee & Prairie du Chien Railway Company, August, 1865, as fireman; moved to Janesville in 1866, where he resided till 1869, when he rettuto Milwaukee and served the company as fireman during that year, when he was made engineer; has been in the employ of the road eleven years under its different ministrations. Resides at No. 134 Twenty-sixth street.

Source: History of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, The Western Historical Company, Chicago; A.T. Andreas Proprietor, 1881

 

NICKOLAUS HOELZ

NICKOLAUS HOELZ, No. 724 Galena street, was born in Prussia, March 31, 1828. At the age of 14, he commenced to learn the molders' trade, and has worked at this business since. July 3, 1887, he came to Milwaukee. He had about $35o when be landed here, and now owns his residence and six other houses and lots in the city. All of this property he has acquired by-his constant attention to business since coming here, He is a member of the Molders Union. Mr. Hoelz was married in 1859, to Pauline Beck. She was born in Sax-Aldeuberg, Germany; have had nine children, seven living, six sons and one daughteróLouis, Nickolaus L., John G., Henry C., Henrietta A., Edward P. and Phillip.

Source: History of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, The Western Historical Company, Chicago; A.T. Andreas Proprietor, 1881, pg. 1601

 

HOFFMANN, BILLINGS & CO.

Hoffmann, Billings & Co., manufacturers of brass and iron goods. The firm was established in 1871. Mr. Hoffmann came to Milwaukee in 1855, and commenced business in this line with John Schreiber, under the firm name of J.C. Hoffmann & Co. The partnership was continued up to 1863, when they dissolved and Mr. Hoffmann continued alone until 1869, when he formed a partnership with S.S. Billings. In addition to the factory they carried on a store on Wisconsin street, which they continued until 1872, when Mr. Billings died, and Mr. Hoffmann conducted the business alone, until he took in as a partner C.F. Billings, a brother of his former partner. The company employs 100 men or more, and the business amounts to between $300,000 and $400,000 annually, mostly goods of this own manufacture. The foundry and machine shops are on Cedar street, between Sixth and Seventh, and the store is situated at Nos. 141, 143, 145 and 147 West Water street.

Source: History of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, The Western Historical Company, Chicago; A.T. Andreas Proprietor, 1881, pg. 1293

J.C. HOFFMANN, was born in 1829, at Frankfort-on-the Main, Germany. In 1849, he came to America, and lived in Springfield and Cincinnati until he came to Milwaukee.

C.F. BILLINGS was born August 27, 1832, in Batavia, Genesee County, N.Y. He came to Wisconsin to reside in April, 1862, first commencing in the transportation business, which he continued up to October, 1871. January 1, 1873, he formed a partnership with J.C. Hoffmann.

See also J.Otto Ehberts
See also M. Coogan
See also Samuel Adams
See also D. Thormeier
See also Frederick Kiefer
See also Jacob Reuter
See also John Baas

 

ROBERT HOLDER

Machinist, West Milwaukee shops, was born at Uley, Gloucestershire, England; commenced leraning his trade in his native place, and finished it in the United States; came to this country in 1849, making his home in Syracuse, New York; settled in Milwaukee in 1853 and worked at the Menomonee Locomotive shops tow years; In 1865 commenced with the railroad company in the North Milwaukee shops; worked there till 1866, and went to Portage, where he worked in the company's shops one year; from there removed to Watertown, where he worked three years; then returned to the North Milwaukee shops, and there continued till the opening of the West Milwaukee shops, where he still remains. Residence, North Milwaukee, near the round-house.

Source: History of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, The Western Historical Company, Chicago; A.T. Andreas Proprietor, 1881

 

CARLTON HOLLAND

Is a native of Otsego County, New York. He came West when a boy, aanlived in Chicago several years. He came to Milwaukee in 1852. For several years he was engaged as a wheat buryer for the mills and warehouses of the city. When the first elevator was completed for the receiving of bulk grain, the system of grain inspection, by grades, was commenced. This was in 1858 (the year of the organization of the Milwaukee Chamber of Commerce). The dealers and commission merchants, nearly all members of the chamber, selected, before the grades were established, or even named or defined authoritatively, Carlton Holland as Inspector of Grain, he being at that time, the man most generally acknowledged as a critical and experienced judge of the quality and condition of wheat. The grades at first consisted of such as suggested themselves from the leading qualities that were grown in the Northwest, and the system as first adopted, was somewhat crude, as no definite standard as to weight or condition had been forumlated as a guide to the Inspector. There was club wheat, and No. 1 and No. 2 also fief wheat, which under the old process of milling, was valued at considerably less than club, and deteriorated any quality if mixed with it. The first grades were established by samples selected by Mr. Holland, and kept at the Chamber of Commerce as standard, and he undertook the very laborious and delicate task of inspecting, personally, each car-load of wheat according to these samples. He at that time inspected, from year to year, he has been forced to employ assistants, but has the entire responsibility and charge of the inspection since the system was inaugurated. His cargo certificate of inspection is known in every considerable wheat market in the country and Europe, and his rigid adherence to the grades, as defined by the rules of the Chamber of Commerce, has held them so uniform as to render Milwaukee grades the favorite standard for American Spring wheat in all markets and countries where it is sold. He ahs held the office uninterruptedly, beingin annually reflected, for twenty-three successive years, and is the oldest grain inspector in the Northwest. No better proof of his special fitness, ability and integrity could be adduced than is shown in his continuation in this responsible position for so many years, durin which time, in spite of the many changes in grade, he has not only kept the immense receipts to an undeteriorated standard, but has served to the satisfaction of the various conflicting interests inherent in the trade.

Source: History of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, The Western Historical Company, Chicago; A.T. Andreas Proprietor, 1881

 

ADAM HOLLANDER

ADAM HOLLANDER, manufacturer and dealer in human hair goods, No. 418 Milwaukee street. Mr. Hollander first commenced business on East Water street under the Kirby House, in 1869. He had but $150 capital and employed but one lady. His business increased rapidly, and in five years he was carrying a stock of $15,000 and employing twenty ladies in the work. In the Spring of 1878 he moved ot his present location. He has established a reputation at home and throughout adjoining states, so that his trade now reaches the Northwestern and southern States. Mr. Hollander is a native of Germany, born May 14, 1843. He came to America in June, 1856, and lived in New York City one year, coming to Milwaukee in 1857. He married Miss Carrie Trapschuh, of Milwaukee. They have three daughters and two sons. pg 1275

 

WALLACE H. HOLMES

WALLACE H. HOLMES, passenger conductor, was born near Akron, Ohio, in 1846; came to Wisconsin, with his parents, in 1852, landing at the old North Pier, Milwaukee; the household goods were loaded on the wagon, and the team of horses, which they had brought with them, took them across the country, to the Town of Concord, Jefferson County. Here a home was made in the woods, which, at the time, is a finely cultivated, still in possession of his parents. When sixteen years of age, young Holmes commenced life as a railroad man as brakeman on the original Chicago & Northwestern Railway; was in the employ of this line until 1871, when he went to Green Bay, and engaged on construction on the Green Bay & Milwaukee Railway, under Chief Engineer G.A. Randall. In 1872, he was appointed conductor of the construction train, being the second conductor of that line. He continued with that company until 1875, when he left the road to accept the position as clerk in the Beckwith House at Oshkosh, under the well-known proprietor, George Spurr. He continued with Mr. Spurr during his occupancy of the Beckwith, and on his removal to New London, in the New London House. April 1, 1877, he engaged with the Milwaukee, Lake Shore & Western Railroad, as conductor. In November, 1880, he made his home in Wausau. Has been with the company continuously to the present time.

See also Milwaukee, Lake Shore & Western Railroad in the Transportation/Railroad section
Source: History of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, The Western Historical Company, Chicago; A.T. Andreas Proprietor, 1881, pg. 1398-1402

 

JAMES HOLTON

JAMES HOLTON is a native of New Hampshire, born in Lancaster, Coos County, November 20, 1812; passed his boyhood days on the most elegant farm in the Connecticut Valley, and during the year of 188o, the family celebrated the centennial anniversary of the ownership of this farm in their midst. In 1837, Mr. Holton went to Buffalo, N. Y,, and two years later, came West to Wisconsin in a covered wagon, arriving in Milwaukee, February 18, 1839. He took up land on Rock River, and the following year entered his brother's store. He went to Waukesha, and had charge of a store there; then engaged in farming for several years; disposed of his farm, and bought half a section of land adjoining the city limits, carrying on the dairy business five years. He established the first express route by railroad, west of this city. in 1852, and transacted a large business, selling out to the American Express Company. Upon the breaking out of the rebellion, he was appointed by Governor Randall, Assistant Quarter-Master General, with the rank of Colonel, and had charge of the troops quartered in Milwaukee; built five camps, one of which was called "Camp Holton." He was tendered the commission of Colonel of the First Wisconsin Cavalry, and was offered the position to take charge of military stores in Chicago during the war, but declined. After the war, he was appointed Revenge Inspector for this Congressional District, and held that office two years. He was never required to give a bond, either by the Government or the State. He afterwards engaged in insurance business for about two years. In 1868. he went to Florida on account of his health; returned to Milwaukee in 1874.

Mr. Holton was united in marriage, June 2, 1842, to Miss Maria Kendrick, a native of Hanover, New Hampshire. They have four sansóEdward K., a prominent merchant in St. Louis; Albert S., living in Wauwatosa; Francis G. and William J., both residing in Chicago.

Source: History of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, The Western Historical Company, Chicago; A.T. Andreas Proprietor, 1881, pg. 1591

 

FORBES HOMISTON

railroad policeman at the North Milwaukee shops, was born at Great Barrington, Mass., in 1821, and came to Milwaukee in 1843. The following Spring he moved to Fond du Lac; was the second city Marshal of that place, and was five years a subordinate officer at the State Prison in Waupun; entered the service during the late war, as Fife Major of the Tenth Wisconsin Volunteers; served nearly two years. In 1863 he engaged with the railroad company in his present capacity; has been in the employ fo the road seventeen years.

Source: History of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, The Western Historical Company, Chicago; A.T. Andreas Proprietor, 1881

 

DAVID G. HOOKER

Counsel for the Northwestern Mutual Life Insurance Company, is a native of the State of Vermont. He received his education in Middlebury College, graduated in 1853, studied law, and was admitted to the Bar in 1856, commencing the practice of his profession in Milwaukee. In 1864 he associated with H.L. Palmer, the firm being Palmer & Hooker. This firm and others with which Mr. Hooker became connected, acted as attorneys for the Northwestern Mutual Life Insurance Company until 1878, when he was appointed counsel, which position he still holds. Mr. Hooker was City Attorney in 1867-68, 1890-70, and Mayor in 1872-73. He is a man of unusual strength of body and mind. Mr. Hooker's birthplace is Poultney, Vermont; date of birth September 14, 1830.

Source: History of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, The Western Historical Company, Chicago; A.T. Andreas Proprietor, 1881, pg. 1108

 

S.J. HOOKER

Cashier and Deputy Collector of Customs, is a native of Sackett's Harbor, New York, and was born March 13, 1844. He came west with his parents in 1856. Upon the breaking out of the Rebellion in 1861, he enlisted in Company B, of Milwaukee, and served in the Fifth Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry; was promoted and commissioned First Lieutenant Thirty-first Regiment Wisconsin Infantry, also served in the Signal Corps; remained in the service until the close of the war. He entered the office of Collector of Customs in July, 1869; through several administrations of the office has served as Deputy Collector and Cashier.

Source: History of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, The Western Historical Company, Chicago; A.T. Andreas Proprietor, 1881, pg. 1063

 

SAMUEL T. HOOKER

is a native of Northhampton, Massachusetts. He was born February 23, 1816. His family during his infancy removed to Sacketts Harbor, New York. His father, Samuel F. Hooker there became largely engaged in merchandising and in navigation on Lake Ontario. He was one of the builders and owners of the "Ontario" the first steamboat ever built or run on the lakes. Young Hooker has often sailed in her, and spent two seasons as purser aboard the steamboat "United States," running on the line from Ogdensburg to Lewiston. In all the earlier years of his life he was engaged in merchandising and transportation on Lake Ontario and the St. Lawrence River, his home being at Sacketts Harbor till 1853, at which time he moved to Cape Vincent, the lake terminus of the Rome & Watertown Railroad, and took charge of the elevator at that point. Two years later, in 1855, he came to Milwaukee, rented the Badger Warehouse then one of the largest in the city, and entered into the grain trade. His firm at first was Hooker, Collamer & Fowler. In a few years Fowler left the firm and it became Hooker, Collamer & Nicols. IN many respects it was the largest and solidest wheat firm in the city. It did the largest wheat business and had an extensive and undoubted credit. Furthermore the united length of the three members of the firm was 18 feet 4 inches, and their combined weight 650 pounds. For many years-up to the time the bag wheat business went out, Mr. Hooker was the leading house in that business. He was also interested in several grain carrying vessels. The firm after 1859 consisted of Mr. HOoker and his old partner Mr. Nicols, the style of the firm being Hooker & Nichols. This former did business for nearly twelve years when Mr. Nichols retired to his farm. For some years after, Mr. Hooker continued alone, but since 1875 has been connected with his sons in the business. The present firm is Hooker, Crittenden & Co., and they are in the self-same business established by the senior partner in Milwaukee twenty-six years ago. Mr. Hooker is now the oldest grain dealer in the city, and throughout his long business career has preserved so honored name and an untarnished reputation.

Source: History of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, The Western Historical Company, Chicago; A.T. Andreas Proprietor, 1881, pg. 1144

He has been a member of the Milwaukee Chamber of Commerce from its organization in 1858 up to the present time. He has held office in the Chamber almost constantly since it was organized, as a director, an arbitrator, and a member of the Board of Appeals. He served as Vice President in 1861 and as President in 1862. The universal esteem in which he held by his fellow members is shown in the fact that he has been elected and reelected as a member of the Board of Arbitrators fifteen times in succession, and is now the President of that most important committee, having in the province of his duties the hearing and settlement of all disputes and differences arising out of the immense business carried on by the members of the Chamber. Mr. Hooker held the office of United States Marshal for the Distinct of Wisconsin from 1865 to 1869, and was the Collector of the United States Customs for the Milwaukee District from 1869 to 1871. He is still in active business, his house having but recently established a branch in Duluth, which is under the personal supervision of his son, William T. Hooker.

In physique Mr. Hooker is the most notable person on the floor. He is 6 feet 4 inches in height, hair and beard grey, eyes mild brown, and, as he stands in the ring or mingles in the crowd, straight as of yore, towers head and shoulders above the throng like some solid snow-capped mountain, standing among surrounding hills. At the already ripe age of 65 years, he has never since his earliest remembrance spent a day in bed from sickness. He married, January 2, 1840, Miss Harriet Burnham of Ogdensburg, New York, who is still living. His children are: Henry B., Harriet B., Mrs. A.W. Carver; Samuel J. Hooker, Cornelia, Mrs. W.L. Mann; William T. Hooker, Charles B. Hooker and Elizabeth Hooker.

 

WM. T. HOOKER

is a native of New York, born in 1847 in Sacketts Harbor. He came to Milwaukee in 1854. He is a member of the firm of Hooker, Crittenden & Co., of Duluth, and S.T. Hooker & Sons, Commission merchants, Mitchell Building.

Source: History of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, The Western Historical Company, Chicago; A.T. Andreas Proprietor, 1881, pg. 1161

 

OTIS P. HOPKINS

was born at Clarence, Erie County, N.Y., in December, 1819. He came to Milwaukee about 1858, and during a residence here of thirty years he was prominently identified with the city in various capacities. For ten years he was connected with the firm of Bosworth & Sons. He died on the 28th of October, 1878. (in the section with Chemists, Pharmacists and Druggists)

Source: History of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, The Western Historical Company, Chicago; A.T. Andreas Proprietor, 1881, pg. 1041

 

CHAS. HOPPENRATH

general florist, No. 954 Teutonia street; established in 1858; a native of Germany, born in 1826. He came to America in 1852, and located in New York one year. IN 1853 he came to Milwaukee. He has two sons and two daughters.

Source: History of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, The Western Historical Company, Chicago; A.T. Andreas Proprietor, 1881, pg. 1540

 

PHILLIP HORTER

dealer in groceries and provisions, flour, feed, crockery, etc., No. 877 Kinnickinic avenue. Commenced business in the Fall of 1873. Carries at present a $2,000 stock and does an annual business which ranges from $15,000 to $20,000. Mr. Horter was born in Hesse-Darmstadt, Germany, April 24, 1831. He came to the United States in January, 1856, lived in New York nine months and then came to Milwaukee. He was married in June, 1860, to Miss Zena Mitchell, of Germany. They have two sons and two daughters.

Source: History of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, The Western Historical Company, Chicago; A.T. Andreas Proprietor, 1881, pg. 1199

 

REV. FREDERICK W. HUELSTER

Pastor of Salem's Church of the Evangelical Association, was born of Catholic parentage September 18, 1830, in the Province of Westphalia, Germany. He was educated until 16 years of age in his native town; came to the United States in 1847, and was for eight years in the printing business in New York city, giving some time to general study. In 1855, he settled in Dodge County, Wisconsin, and in the following year was converted and soon felt it his duty to prepare for the ministry. He joined the Evangelical Association and joined the ministry. He was taken on probation in the Milwaukee District, and began preaching in 1859 on the Sheboygan Circuit. The following year he was transferred to the Oshkosh Circuit; was married October 18, 1856, to Miss Christina Steiner, formerly of Switzerland. They have nine children. The oldest one, Henry, is a merchant in St. Paul, Minnesota. The other eight are at home. During 1861 and 1862 he was stationed at Jefferson, Wisconsin, and then two years in Sauk County and afterward two years in Lomira, Dodge County. In April 1867, he was stationed in Milwaukee, and during his pastorate he built the Zion's Church; was then two years at Hartford, and after this tree years in Racine. From 1876 to 1879, he was at Menomonee Falls, Wisconsin. In April, 1879, he was appointed to Salem's Church, and re-appointed in April 1880. He has, for several years, been Secretary of the Wisconsin Conference of the Evangelical Association. He ahs built tow churches, and has made several substantial improvements during his pastorates.

Source: History of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, The Western Historical Company, Chicago; A.T. Andreas Proprietor, 1881, pg. 941

 

H.N. HULLISON

H.N. HULLISON, engineer, runs over the main line from Milwaukee to Wausau. The subject of this sketch was born in Norway in 1849; came to American with his parents in 1855; made his home in Chicago, Illinois, and learned the machinist's trade in the shops of the Chicago & Northwestern Railway, commencing early in life; was with that company four years. He then engaged with the Chicago, Alton & St. Louis Railway, as machinist. In 1869 he was transferred to the position of locomotive engineer, and continued with that company about three years. He was next employed on the St. Louis, Kansas City & Northern Railway, was engaged on this line and other Western railways, as engineer, till 1874, when he moved to Milwaukee and entered the service of the Milwaukee, Lake Shore & Western Railway. Shortly after this he made his home in Manitowoc, where he now resides. He has been in the company's employ about seven years. Has never met with a serious accident.

See also Milwaukee, Lake Shore & Western Railroad in the Transportation/Railroad section
Source: History of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, The Western Historical Company, Chicago; A.T. Andreas Proprietor, 1881, pg. 1398-1402

 

GEORGE E. HUNTINGTON

passenger engineer Chicago Division, was born in Connecticut in 1834; moved to Chillicothe, Ohio, in 1853; commenced railroading as a fireman on the Marietta & Cincinnati Railroad in 1854; was made engineer in Novebmer, 1855; remained on this line till February, 1858. In the Spring of that year he came to Milwaukee, and on the 3d of April of that year engaged with teh Milwaukee & La Crosse Railroad Company as engineer. In 1864 he moved to New Lisbon, Wis., continuing in the company's employ till the Fall of 1871. He then engaged with teh West Wisconsin Railroad Compan as engineer, and remained on this line till 1874, when he returned to Milwaukee and entered the service of the Chicago, Milwaukee, & St. Paul Railway Company as engineer on the old line (Milwaukee & La Crosse), then spent on the WEst Wisconsin Railroad, he has been constantly employed on the Milwaukee & La Crosse road under its different managements since April, 1858, to February, 1881. No accident of importance has ever happened to him. Residence, No. 379 Third Street.

Source: History of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, The Western Historical Company, Chicago; A.T. Andreas Proprietor, 1881

 

C.F. ILSLEY

of the Banking House of Marshall & Ilsley, is a native of the State of Maine, came West to Wisconsin and located in Milwaukee in February, 1847. Entered the Wisconsin Marine and Fire Insurance Company Bank and remained there three years. Then associated with Mr. Marshall, his present partner, and since then, for a period of thirty years, has successfully conducted the banking business. Messrs. Marshall & Ilsley are the oldest private bankers in the State. Mr. Ilsley held the position of Trustee of the Northwestern Mutual Life Insurance Company for ten years; was a Director of the Milwaukee & Prairie du Chien Railroad. During the war Marshall & Ilsley were financial agents of the State for the extra pay voted the soldiers. They with Alexander Mitchell negotiated the first State Loan, in 1853.

Source: History of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, The Western Historical Company, Chicago; A.T. Andreas Proprietor, 1881, pg. 1100

Page 1303 states that Charles F. was the treasurer of North Western Iron Company which incorporated in 1853 and operated mines in Dodge County on 80 acres with 100 men employed. Page 740 states that the first women's soldiers Aid Society of Milwaukee was Milwaukee Ladies Association for the aid of Military hospitals. Mrs. Charles F. Ilsley is listed as one of about 14 soliciting committee members.

Page 750 the bank Marshall and Ilsley agreed to pay $25 a month to the Wisconsin Soldiers' Aid Society.

 

JOHN ISLEB

JOHN ISLEB, engineer La Crosse Division, was born in Pawpaw, Michigan, in 1851; came to Wisconsin, with his parents, when only three years of age (1853). In May, 1871, he commenced work as fireman on the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railway; continued in that capacity till the Spring of 1880, when he was promoted to engineer; has been with the company continuously since commencing. Residence, NO. 541 Fourteenth street. Source: History of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, The Western Historical Company, Chicago; A.T. Andreas Proprietor, 1881, pg. 1366