Biographies and Family Information

Includes Marriages, Births, Confirmations, Baptisms

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SISTER ELAINE LABONTE

Sister Elaine LaBonte, 95, whose deep faith and adventurous spirit took her to China as a missionary and later helped her survive a Japanese prisoner-of-war camp. A member of the Sisters of St. Francis of Assisi, LaBonte was the last surviving member of her order to have served in China before World War II. She died of natural causes March 23.

 

W.J. LANGSON

Secretary of the Board of Trade, is a native of Dublin, Ireland, and came to Milwaukee in 1850; attended school, and completed his education here; then entered the office of the Sentinel, under General Rufus King, and was connected with that paper in various capacities, holding the position of commercial editor most of the time. He resigned that position to accept the office of Secretary of Trade, and since then, for the past fifteen years, has occupied that position.

Source: History of Milwaukee County, 1881, pg. 1153

 

CAPT. JOHN D. LARSON

Born in Norway, April 29, 1843; came to America with his parents in 1845, landed in Milwaukee August 26, of that year, and removed immediately to Manitowoc, on a farm, where his parents have since died. At 13 years of age John D. Larson commenced sailing the lakes as boy (sic) in his brother's vessel, and has followed the water ever since. His first command was the schooner "ERIE," which he sailed in 1861, being then but 18 years of age. The vessel being sold shortly after Captain Larson assumed command, he became master of the "TRANSIT," and has been constantly in command of vessels every season since. In 1873 he commanded a steam barge, trading to all Lake Michigan ports, and in 1877 became master of the propeller "CITY OF MADISON," of which he was in command at the time she was burned. This accident happened about sixty-five miles northeast of Chicago at 3 o'clock A.M., and was owing to the incompetency of the engineer placed in charge by her owner. Captain Larson married, May 10, 1873, Cornelia, daughter of Captain Moody, an old sea captain of Buffalo, New York, where Mrs. Larson was born September 1, 1848. Her parents are still residing in this city, to which they removed in 1855; her brother, Charles E., being in command of the Milwaukee Tug Company's wrecking-tug "WELCOME." Captain and Mrs. Larson have two children--Mabel C., born March 14, 1874, and Charles B., born July 29, 1875. Their present residence is in the Old Moody home, corner of Lapham street and Fifth avenue.

Source: History of Milwaukee County, 1881

 

HENRY M. LEE

Foreman of Wolf & Davidson's ship-yard, was born in New Redford, Mass, in 1834. Learned his trade in Oswego, N.Y., with G.S. Wicks, and was employed in these yards for five years. He then went to New York City, working there three years; next to Buffalo, where he worked some time. Also at Milan, Ohio. He came to Milwaukee in 1859, and commenced work with B.B. Jones, as foreman caulker in his ship-yard; then with Ellsworth & Davidson in the same capacity. Since the change of the firm to Wolf & Davidson he has held the same position. Residence No. 4, Washington street.

Source: HISTORY OF MILWAUKEE 1881

 

CAPTAIN JAMES LEIGH

Born near Dublin, Ireland, 29th December, 1829, son of James and Catharine (Murphy) Leigh, has sailed the lakes for twenty-seven consecutive seasons. He emigrated to Maine with his parents in 1837, and when 12 years of age commenced work in a lath(sic) mill where the labor not agreeing with him (sic), he shipped as cook on an American coasting vessel, and was on the Atlantic seaboard until he came to Wisconsin with his father's family in 1850, where they took up two sections of land on the Fox River, where the father died in 1873--the mother having died in Maine some years before. Captain Leigh's first voyage on the lakes was made in 1850, as seaman on the "NEBRASKA." He then sailed as mate of the schooner "EMMA," which he had fitted out of the stocks, and the next season took charge as master. He subsequently became part owner of the "BUENA VISTA," out of which he sold, to purchase a half interest in "CHAPIN," which he sailed for five years. During his entire service he has never had a shipwreck, lost a man overboard, or had one die on board. Captain Leigh was married in this city, September 7, 1853, to Sarah Scott, whose parents emigrated to this country from Ireland when she was a mere child. They have five children: Mary C., born September 7, 1854, now married; Sarah E., born July 20, 1856, married April 15, 1880--both residents of this city; Ida M., born June 19, 1858; James J., born November 1860, and Charles Edward, born January 19, 1866. After one trip made in the season of 1877, Captain Leigh, finding lake traffic unprofitable, sold out, and has not followed the lakes since.

Source: History of Milwaukee County, 1881, pg. 492

 

JOHN F. LINEHAN

Meat market, No. 171 Michigan street, is a native of New York City, and came here in 1858. He established his present business in 1872.

Source: History of Milwaukee County, 1881 pg. 1233

 

CAPT. LOUIS W. LITTS

No. 501 Reed Street, was born near Albany, N.Y. in 1818, and has been sailing over forty years. His home was in the State of New York, until 1869. His first experience was aboard the schooner "INDEPENDENCE" as cook, on Lake Ontario. He sailed to Chicago in the schooner "JOHN BEAUPRE" before there was any harbor. They had to anchor outside and take the freight ashore in small boats. During the past eight years he has commanded the "BAY STATE," "ST. NICHOLAS," "YOUNG AMERICA," and others. In 1869, he made his home in Chicago. There was no Custom House in Chicago when he first visited the place. The only Custom House was located at Mackinaw, and vessels had to report going each way. He has been very fortunate in his forty years career on the lakes, having never been wrecked or lost a vessel.

Source: History of Milwaukee County, 1881

 

MAX LOEBEL

Proprietor of meat market at No. 289 West Water street, is an Austrian, who came to America, landing in New York City, July 4, 1870. Mr. Loebel came to Milwaukee and established his present business in 1877.

Source: History of Milwaukee, 1881, pg. 1233

 

D. LONG

D. Long, second mate of the Milwaukee, was born in 1858, in Hamilton, Ontario. He grew up in the city of Milwaukee, and at the age of eighteen years shipped as watchman on the steamer Saginaw, plying between Milwaukee and Grand Haven, and remained with her in that capacity two years. He then served as lookout on the same steamer, a season, and for another season as wheelsman. During four winters when the boat was laid up, he was her watchman. About the year 1880, he shipped as second mate on the Flora, which ran between Milwaukee, Wis., and Ludington, Mich. From the Flora he went in the same capacity on the steamer John A. Dix for one season, travelling(sic) the same route, and the next season was first mate of the same steamer. The following season he shipped as second mate on the steamer Minneapolis, which ran between Chicago and Buffalo. About eight years ago Mr. Long entered the service of the Graham & Morton Transportation Co., with the exception of one season, when he was second mate of the steamer Wisconsin, has since been with that company and in the capacity of second mate. Mr. Long has served his employers faithfully, and is a capable officer. Socially he is a member of the Maccabees Lodge No. 203, of Milwaukee, in which city he makes his home.

The parents of Mr. Long were Daniel and Agnes (Brady) Long, natives of Ireland. His father was a farmer by occupation and left Canada, removing to Milwaukee when our subject was about ten years of age. His death occurred in that city in 1888, and the mother passed away in 1896, and she now rests beside her husband in the cemetery at Milwaukee.

 

Dr. Hulbell Loomis

Source: The Medical History of Milwaukee, By Louis Frederick Frank. Published 1915. Germania Publishing Co.

Dr. Hulbell Loomis of St. Joseph, Mich., visited Chicago and Milwaukee in 1834, but not finding a satisfactory environment on the "We Shore," returned to St. Joseph. In 1836 he again came to Milwaukee with a party of immigrants and located on Walker's Point, but afterwards bought a homestead on what is now the square bounded by Reed, Hanover, Florida and Oregon streets. Dr. Loomis was born in New London, Conn., in 1798 ; he was an "old school" physician, having received a license from the New York State Medical Association, settling in Michigan 1827. In Milwaukee he built tip a large practice, which he continued to enjoy until his death in 1849.

 

FRANK E. LOVELAND

Candidate for City of Wauwatosa
Frank E. Loveland, Republican candidate for city treasurer, also nominated by the Citizens' organization. He is well known to Wauwatosa citizens as a courteous and obliging official. He was born in Wauwatosa and except for a few years spent in Vermont has always made it his home. He is employed in the office of the Milwaukee Pickle Co. in this city.

Source: Wauwatosa News April 1, 1899

 

HENRY LUCAS

One of the prominent consulting engineers of Milwaukee, is a Frenchman by birth, born in Paris on June 15, 1852, being the son of Louis and Charlotte Lucas, who were both natives of the same city. They came to the United States about the middle of the Nineteenth century and soon after landing on the shores of the new world located at West Bend, Wis., where the father followed his trade as a tinsmith. Both Mr. and Mrs. Lucas continued to reside in West Bend all their lives. During the Civil war Mr. Lucas organized a company known as the West Bend Guards. He had charge of a Federal prison at West Bend for some time, and subsequently was placed in charge of the Confederate prisoners at Camp Randall, Madison, Wis. Henry, the subject of this brief review, received his scholastic training in the public schools of West Bend, where he passed through the grades and then finished a course in high school. Before finishing the high school he had determined to become a machinist, and for that purpose obtained a position in the Allis Machine Works at Milwaukee, where he learned his trade. For fifteen years Mr. Lucas worked at his trade, part of the time as foreman for the Appleton Machine Company, of Appleton, Wis. About fifteen years ago he returned to Milwaukee to accept a position as erecting engineer for the Vilter Manufacturing Company, and remained with the firm two years. After severing his connection with the Vilter Company Mr. Lucas installed a confection plant and ran it for eight years; he then took charge of the power plant in the Germania building for eighteen months. He had the honor to install the heating plant in the Wells building, the largest office building in the city of Milwaukee, and was superintendent of the power plant until August, 1908, when he resigned his position to establish himself as a consulting engineer. Mr. Lucas has had wide experience as an engineer and is meeting with most marked success in his present profession. Recently he has installed a plant at Green Bay, which is one of the largest plants in the state. Mr. Lucas is essentially a self-made man, and his present achievements are entirely due to his tireless industry, natural ability, strict attention to every detail of the business himself, and his determination to succeed. Mr. Lucas is well known in the business circles of Milwaukee and is recognized as one of its substantial men.

Source: unknown

 

FREDERICK LUENING

Source: The Medical History of Milwaukee, By Louis Frederick Frank. Published 1915. Germania Publishing Co.

Prominent in German-American circles, defender of personal rights, director of Engelmann's School.

Dr. Frederick Aug. Luening, one of the best known early German-American practitioners, was born March 4th, 1811, in Harpstedt, Hanover, and received his medical education in the universities of Bonn and Goettingen. He came to Milwaukee in 1843, equipped with a high-class schooling, imbued with high ideals, the development of which soon made him an influential factor in the political and social growth of the land of his adoption. Associated in the same cause with his colleagues Drs. Huebschmann. Wunderly, Fessel, Wundsch, and ot completed his education here; then entered the office of the Sentinel, under General Rufus King, and was connected with that paper in various capacities, holding the position of commercial editor most of the time. He resigned that position to accept the office of Secretary of Trade, and since then, for the past fifteen years, has occupied that position.

Source: History of Milwaukee County, 1881, pg. 1153

 

CAPT. JOHN D. LARSON

Born in Norway, April 29, 1843; came to America with his parents in 1845, landed in Milwaukee August 26, of that year, and removed immediately to Manitowoc, on a farm, where his parents have since died. At 13 years of age John D. Larson commenced sailing the lakes as boy (sic) in his brother's vessel, and has followed the water ever since. His first command was the schooner "ERIE," which he sailed in 1861, being then but 18 years of age. The vessel being sold shortly after Captain Larson assumed command, he became master of the "TRANSIT," and has been constantly in command of vessels every season since. In 1873 he commanded a steam barge, trading to all Lake Michigan ports, and in 1877 became master of the propeller "CITY OF MADISON," of which he was in command at the time she was burned. This accident happened about sixty-five miles northeast of Chicago at 3 o'clock A.M., and was owing to the incompetency of the engineer placed in charge by her owner. Captain Larson married, May 10, 1873, Cornelia, daughter of Captain Moody, an old sea captain of Buffalo, New York, where Mrs. Larson was born September 1, 1848. Her parents are still residing in this city, to which they removed in 1855; her brother, Charles E., being in command of the Milwaukee Tug Company's wrecking-tug "WELCOME." Captain and Mrs. Larson have two children--Mabel C., born March 14, 1874, and Charles B., born July 29, 1875. Their present residence is in the Old Moody home, corner of Lapham street and Fifth avenue.

Source: History of Milwaukee County, 1881

 

HENRY M. LEE

Foreman of Wolf & Davidson's ship-yard, was born in New Redford, Mass, in 1834. Learned his trade in Oswego, N.Y., with G.S. Wicks, and was employed in these yards for five years. He then went to New York City, working there three years; next to Buffalo, where he worked some time. Also at Milan, Ohio. He came to Milwaukee in 1859, and commenced work with B.B. Jones, as foreman caulker in his ship-yard; then with Ellsworth & Davidson in the same capacity. Since the change of the firm to Wolf & Davidson he has held the same position. Residence No. 4, Washington street.

Source: HISTORY OF MILWAUKEE 1881

 

CAPTAIN JAMES LEIGH

Born near Dublin, Ireland, 29th December, 1829, son of James and Catharine (Murphy) Leigh, has sailed the lakes for twenty-seven consecutive seasons. He emigrated to Maine with his parents in 1837, and when 12 years of age commenced work in a lath(sic) mill where the labor not agreeing with him (sic), he shipped as cook on an American coasting vessel, and was on the Atlantic seaboard until he came to Wisconsin with his father's family in 1850, where they took up two sections of land on the Fox River, where the father died in 1873--the mother having died in Maine some years before. Captain Leigh's first voyage on the lakes was made in 1850, as seaman on the "NEBRASKA." He then sailed as mate of the schooner "EMMA," which he had fitted out of the stocks, and the next season took charge as master. He subsequently became part owner of the "BUENA VISTA," out of which he sold, to purchase a half interest in "CHAPIN," which he sailed for five years. During his entire service he has never had a shipwreck, lost a man overboard, or had one die on board. Captain Leigh was married in this city, September 7, 1853, to Sarah Scott, whose parents emigrated to this country from Ireland when she was a mere child. They have five children: Mary C., born September 7, 1854, now married; Sarah E., born July 20, 1856, married April 15, 1880--both residents of this city; Ida M., born June 19, 1858; James J., born November 1860, and Charles Edward, born January 19, 1866. After one trip made in the season of 1877, Captain Leigh, finding lake traffic unprofitable, sold out, and has not followed the lakes since.

Source: History of Milwaukee County, 1881, pg. 492

 

JOHN F. LINEHAN

Meat market, No. 171 Michigan street, is a native of New York City, and came here in 1858. He established his present business in 1872.

Source: History of Milwaukee County, 1881 pg. 1233

 

CAPT. LOUIS W. LITTS

No. 501 Reed Street, was born near Albany, N.Y. in 1818, and has been sailing over forty years. His home was in the State of New York, until 1869. His first experience was aboard the schooner "INDEPENDENCE" as cook, on Lake Ontario. He sailed to Chicago in the schooner "JOHN BEAUPRE" before there was any harbor. They had to anchor outside and take the freight ashore in small boats. During the past eight years he has commanded the "BAY STATE," "ST. NICHOLAS," "YOUNG AMERICA," and others. In 1869, he made his home in Chicago. There was no Custom House in Chicago when he first visited the place. The only Custom House was located at Mackinaw, and vessels had to report going each way. He has been very fortunate in his forty years career on the lakes, having never been wrecked or lost a vessel.

Source: History of Milwaukee County, 1881

 

MAX LOEBEL

Proprietor of meat market at No. 289 West Water street, is an Austrian, who came to America, landing in New York City, July 4, 1870. Mr. Loebel came to Milwaukee and established his present business in 1877.

Source: History of Milwaukee, 1881, pg. 1233

 

D. LONG

D. Long, second mate of the Milwaukee, was born in 1858, in Hamilton, Ontario. He grew up in the city of Milwaukee, and at the age of eighteen years shipped as watchman on the steamer Saginaw, plying between Milwaukee and Grand Haven, and remained with her in that capacity two years. He then served as lookout on the same steamer, a season, and for another season as wheelsman. During four winters when the boat was laid up, he was her watchman. About the year 1880, he shipped as second mate on the Flora, which ran between Milwaukee, Wis., and Ludington, Mich. From the Flora he went in the same capacity on the steamer John A. Dix for one season, travelling(sic) the same route, and the next season was first mate of the same steamer. The following season he shipped as second mate on the steamer Minneapolis, which ran between Chicago and Buffalo. About eight years ago Mr. Long entered the service of the Graham & Morton Transportation Co., with the exception of one season, when he was second mate of the steamer Wisconsin, has since been with that company and in the capacity of second mate. Mr. Long has served his employers faithfully, and is a capable officer. Socially he is a member of the Maccabees Lodge No. 203, of Milwaukee, in which city he makes his home.

The parents of Mr. Long were Daniel and Agnes (Brady) Long, natives of Ireland. His father was a farmer by occupation and left Canada, removing to Milwaukee when our subject was about ten years of age. His death occurred in that city in 1888, and the mother passed away in 1896, and she now rests beside her husband in the cemetery at Milwaukee.

 

Dr. Hulbell Loomis

Source: The Medical History of Milwaukee, By Louis Frederick Frank. Published 1915. Germania Publishing Co.

Dr. Hulbell Loomis of St. Joseph, Mich., visited Chicago and Milwaukee in 1834, but not finding a satisfactory environment on the "We Shore," returned to St. Joseph. In 1836 he again came to Milwaukee with a party of immigrants and located on Walker's Point, but afterwards bought a homestead on what is now the square bounded by Reed, Hanover, Florida and Oregon streets. Dr. Loomis was born in New London, Conn., in 1798 ; he was an "old school" physician, having received a license from the New York State Medical Association, settling in Michigan 1827. In Milwaukee he built tip a large practice, which he continued to enjoy until his death in 1849.

 

FRANK E. LOVELAND

Candidate for City of Wauwatosa
Frank E. Loveland, Republican candidate for city treasurer, also nominated by the Citizens' organization. He is well known to Wauwatosa citizens as a courteous and obliging official. He was born in Wauwatosa and except for a few years spent in Vermont has always made it his home. He is employed in the office of the Milwaukee Pickle Co. in this city.

Source: Wauwatosa News April 1, 1899

 

HENRY LUCAS

One of the prominent consulting engineers of Milwaukee, is a Frenchman by birth, born in Paris on June 15, 1852, being the son of Louis and Charlotte Lucas, who were both natives of the same city. They came to the United States about the middle of the Nineteenth century and soon after landing on the shores of the new world located at West Bend, Wis., where the father followed his trade as a tinsmith. Both Mr. and Mrs. Lucas continued to reside in West Bend all their lives. During the Civil war Mr. Lucas organized a company known as the West Bend Guards. He had charge of a Federal prison at West Bend for some time, and subsequently was placed in charge of the Confederate prisoners at Camp Randall, Madison, Wis. Henry, the subject of this brief review, received his scholastic training in the public schools of West Bend, where he passed through the grades and then finished a course in high school. Before finishing the high school he had determined to become a machinist, and for that purpose obtained a position in the Allis Machine Works at Milwaukee, where he learned his trade. For fifteen years Mr. Lucas worked at his trade, part of the time as foreman for the Appleton Machine Company, of Appleton, Wis. About fifteen years ago he returned to Milwaukee to accept a position as erecting engineer for the Vilter Manufacturing Company, and remained with the firm two years. After severing his connection with the Vilter Company Mr. Lucas installed a confection plant and ran it for eight years; he then took charge of the power plant in the Germania building for eighteen months. He had the honor to install the heating plant in the Wells building, the largest office building in the city of Milwaukee, and was superintendent of the power plant until August, 1908, when he resigned his position to establish himself as a consulting engineer. Mr. Lucas has had wide experience as an engineer and is meeting with most marked success in his present profession. Recently he has installed a plant at Green Bay, which is one of the largest plants in the state. Mr. Lucas is essentially a self-made man, and his present achievements are entirely due to his tireless industry, natural ability, strict attention to every detail of the business himself, and his determination to succeed. Mr. Lucas is well known in the business circles of Milwaukee and is recognized as one of its substantial men.

Source: unknown

 

FREDERICK LUENING

Source: The Medical History of Milwaukee, By Louis Frederick Frank. Published 1915. Germania Publishing Co.

Prominent in German-American circles, defender of personal rights, director of Engelmann's School.

Dr. Frederick Aug. Luening, one of the best known early German-American practitioners, was born March 4th, 1811, in Harpstedt, Hanover, and received his medical education in the universities of Bonn and Goettingen. He came to Milwaukee in 1843, equipped with a high-class schooling, imbued with high ideals, the development of which soon made him an influential factor in the political and social growth of the land of his adoption. Associated in the same cause with his colleagues Drs. Huebschmann. Wunderly, Fessel, Wundsch, and otleted his education here; then entered the office of the Sentinel, under General Rufus King, and was connected with that paper in various capacities, holding the position of commercial editor most of the time. He resigned that position to accept the office of Secretary of Trade, and since then, for the past fifteen years, has occupied that position.

Source: History of Milwaukee County, 1881, pg. 1153

 

CAPT. JOHN D. LARSON

Born in Norway, April 29, 1843; came to America with his parents in 1845, landed in Milwaukee August 26, of that year, and removed immediately to Manitowoc, on a farm, where his parents have since died. At 13 years of age John D. Larson commenced sailing the lakes as boy (sic) in his brother's vessel, and has followed the water ever since. His first command was the schooner "ERIE," which he sailed in 1861, being then but 18 years of age. The vessel being sold shortly after Captain Larson assumed command, he became master of the "TRANSIT," and has been constantly in command of vessels every season since. In 1873 he commanded a steam barge, trading to all Lake Michigan ports, and in 1877 became master of the propeller "CITY OF MADISON," of which he was in command at the time she was burned. This accident happened about sixty-five miles northeast of Chicago at 3 o'clock A.M., and was owing to the incompetency of the engineer placed in charge by her owner. Captain Larson married, May 10, 1873, Cornelia, daughter of Captain Moody, an old sea captain of Buffalo, New York, where Mrs. Larson was born September 1, 1848. Her parents are still residing in this city, to which they removed in 1855; her brother, Charles E., being in command of the Milwaukee Tug Company's wrecking-tug "WELCOME." Captain and Mrs. Larson have two children--Mabel C., born March 14, 1874, and Charles B., born July 29, 1875. Their present residence is in the Old Moody home, corner of Lapham street and Fifth avenue.

Source: History of Milwaukee County, 1881

 

HENRY M. LEE

Foreman of Wolf & Davidson's ship-yard, was born in New Redford, Mass, in 1834. Learned his trade in Oswego, N.Y., with G.S. Wicks, and was employed in these yards for five years. He then went to New York City, working there three years; next to Buffalo, where he worked some time. Also at Milan, Ohio. He came to Milwaukee in 1859, and commenced work with B.B. Jones, as foreman caulker in his ship-yard; then with Ellsworth & Davidson in the same capacity. Since the change of the firm to Wolf & Davidson he has held the same position. Residence No. 4, Washington street.

Source: HISTORY OF MILWAUKEE 1881

 

CAPTAIN JAMES LEIGH

Born near Dublin, Ireland, 29th December, 1829, son of James and Catharine (Murphy) Leigh, has sailed the lakes for twenty-seven consecutive seasons. He emigrated to Maine with his parents in 1837, and when 12 years of age commenced work in a lath(sic) mill where the labor not agreeing with him (sic), he shipped as cook on an American coasting vessel, and was on the Atlantic seaboard until he came to Wisconsin with his father's family in 1850, where they took up two sections of land on the Fox River, where the father died in 1873--the mother having died in Maine some years before. Captain Leigh's first voyage on the lakes was made in 1850, as seaman on the "NEBRASKA." He then sailed as mate of the schooner "EMMA," which he had fitted out of the stocks, and the next season took charge as master. He subsequently became part owner of the "BUENA VISTA," out of which he sold, to purchase a half interest in "CHAPIN," which he sailed for five years. During his entire service he has never had a shipwreck, lost a man overboard, or had one die on board. Captain Leigh was married in this city, September 7, 1853, to Sarah Scott, whose parents emigrated to this country from Ireland when she was a mere child. They have five children: Mary C., born September 7, 1854, now married; Sarah E., born July 20, 1856, married April 15, 1880--both residents of this city; Ida M., born June 19, 1858; James J., born November 1860, and Charles Edward, born January 19, 1866. After one trip made in the season of 1877, Captain Leigh, finding lake traffic unprofitable, sold out, and has not followed the lakes since.

Source: History of Milwaukee County, 1881, pg. 492

 

JOHN F. LINEHAN

Meat market, No. 171 Michigan street, is a native of New York City, and came here in 1858. He established his present business in 1872.

Source: History of Milwaukee County, 1881 pg. 1233

 

CAPT. LOUIS W. LITTS

No. 501 Reed Street, was born near Albany, N.Y. in 1818, and has been sailing over forty years. His home was in the State of New York, until 1869. His first experience was aboard the schooner "INDEPENDENCE" as cook, on Lake Ontario. He sailed to Chicago in the schooner "JOHN BEAUPRE" before there was any harbor. They had to anchor outside and take the freight ashore in small boats. During the past eight years he has commanded the "BAY STATE," "ST. NICHOLAS," "YOUNG AMERICA," and others. In 1869, he made his home in Chicago. There was no Custom House in Chicago when he first visited the place. The only Custom House was located at Mackinaw, and vessels had to report going each way. He has been very fortunate in his forty years career on the lakes, having never been wrecked or lost a vessel.

Source: History of Milwaukee County, 1881

 

MAX LOEBEL

Proprietor of meat market at No. 289 West Water street, is an Austrian, who came to America, landing in New York City, July 4, 1870. Mr. Loebel came to Milwaukee and established his present business in 1877.

Source: History of Milwaukee, 1881, pg. 1233

 

D. LONG

D. Long, second mate of the Milwaukee, was born in 1858, in Hamilton, Ontario. He grew up in the city of Milwaukee, and at the age of eighteen years shipped as watchman on the steamer Saginaw, plying between Milwaukee and Grand Haven, and remained with her in that capacity two years. He then served as lookout on the same steamer, a season, and for another season as wheelsman. During four winters when the boat was laid up, he was her watchman. About the year 1880, he shipped as second mate on the Flora, which ran between Milwaukee, Wis., and Ludington, Mich. From the Flora he went in the same capacity on the steamer John A. Dix for one season, travelling(sic) the same route, and the next season was first mate of the same steamer. The following season he shipped as second mate on the steamer Minneapolis, which ran between Chicago and Buffalo. About eight years ago Mr. Long entered the service of the Graham & Morton Transportation Co., with the exception of one season, when he was second mate of the steamer Wisconsin, has since been with that company and in the capacity of second mate. Mr. Long has served his employers faithfully, and is a capable officer. Socially he is a member of the Maccabees Lodge No. 203, of Milwaukee, in which city he makes his home.

The parents of Mr. Long were Daniel and Agnes (Brady) Long, natives of Ireland. His father was a farmer by occupation and left Canada, removing to Milwaukee when our subject was about ten years of age. His death occurred in that city in 1888, and the mother passed away in 1896, and she now rests beside her husband in the cemetery at Milwaukee.

 

Dr. Hulbell Loomis

Source: The Medical History of Milwaukee, By Louis Frederick Frank. Published 1915. Germania Publishing Co.

Dr. Hulbell Loomis of St. Joseph, Mich., visited Chicago and Milwaukee in 1834, but not finding a satisfactory environment on the "We Shore," returned to St. Joseph. In 1836 he again came to Milwaukee with a party of immigrants and located on Walker's Point, but afterwards bought a homestead on what is now the square bounded by Reed, Hanover, Florida and Oregon streets. Dr. Loomis was born in New London, Conn., in 1798 ; he was an "old school" physician, having received a license from the New York State Medical Association, settling in Michigan 1827. In Milwaukee he built tip a large practice, which he continued to enjoy until his death in 1849.

 

FRANK E. LOVELAND

Candidate for City of Wauwatosa
Frank E. Loveland, Republican candidate for city treasurer, also nominated by the Citizens' organization. He is well known to Wauwatosa citizens as a courteous and obliging official. He was born in Wauwatosa and except for a few years spent in Vermont has always made it his home. He is employed in the office of the Milwaukee Pickle Co. in this city.

Source: Wauwatosa News April 1, 1899

 

HENRY LUCAS

One of the prominent consulting engineers of Milwaukee, is a Frenchman by birth, born in Paris on June 15, 1852, being the son of Louis and Charlotte Lucas, who were both natives of the same city. They came to the United States about the middle of the Nineteenth century and soon after landing on the shores of the new world located at West Bend, Wis., where the father followed his trade as a tinsmith. Both Mr. and Mrs. Lucas continued to reside in West Bend all their lives. During the Civil war Mr. Lucas organized a company known as the West Bend Guards. He had charge of a Federal prison at West Bend for some time, and subsequently was placed in charge of the Confederate prisoners at Camp Randall, Madison, Wis. Henry, the subject of this brief review, received his scholastic training in the public schools of West Bend, where he passed through the grades and then finished a course in high school. Before finishing the high school he had determined to become a machinist, and for that purpose obtained a position in the Allis Machine Works at Milwaukee, where he learned his trade. For fifteen years Mr. Lucas worked at his trade, part of the time as foreman for the Appleton Machine Company, of Appleton, Wis. About fifteen years ago he returned to Milwaukee to accept a position as erecting engineer for the Vilter Manufacturing Company, and remained with the firm two years. After severing his connection with the Vilter Company Mr. Lucas installed a confection plant and ran it for eight years; he then took charge of the power plant in the Germania building for eighteen months. He had the honor to install the heating plant in the Wells building, the largest office building in the city of Milwaukee, and was superintendent of the power plant until August, 1908, when he resigned his position to establish himself as a consulting engineer. Mr. Lucas has had wide experience as an engineer and is meeting with most marked success in his present profession. Recently he has installed a plant at Green Bay, which is one of the largest plants in the state. Mr. Lucas is essentially a self-made man, and his present achievements are entirely due to his tireless industry, natural ability, strict attention to every detail of the business himself, and his determination to succeed. Mr. Lucas is well known in the business circles of Milwaukee and is recognized as one of its substantial men.

Source: unknown

 

FREDERICK LUENING

Source: The Medical History of Milwaukee, By Louis Frederick Frank. Published 1915. Germania Publishing Co.

Prominent in German-American circles, defender of personal rights, director of Engelmann's School.

Dr. Frederick Aug. Luening, one of the best known early German-American practitioners, was born March 4th, 1811, in Harpstedt, Hanover, and received his medical education in the universities of Bonn and Goettingen. He came to Milwaukee in 1843, equipped with a high-class schooling, imbued with high ideals, the development of which soon made him an influential factor in the political and social growth of the land of his adoption. Associated in the same cause with his colleagues Drs. Huebschmann. Wunderly, Fessel, Wundsch, and others, he endeavored to maintain that personal and political freedom, which had been withheld from them in their native land, enviously censuring and fighting what they considered an infringement on their rights. As such in self-defense against nativistic tendencies they petitioned the legislature to grant the same rights to foreign-born citizens as to native Americans. Dr. Luening, likewise with prominent German-Americans such as Bielfeld, Preusser, Neukirch, etc., became an active supporter of the free soil party in 1848, and in 1849 an opponent of a distasteful liquor law, which held the vendor of intoxicating drinks pecuniarily responsible for all damages to the community justly chargeable to such sale or traffic. His interest in educational matters was shown in the foundation of Engelmann's school (German-English Academy) of which he was one of the first directors. Dr. Luening's eventful career was ended by death July 19th, 1861.

 

CAPT. GEORGE LUND

Master of the schooner, "ANNIE O. HANSON," was born in Norway, May 24, 1840. Came to Milwaukee in 1847; enlisted in Co. B, First Wisconsin Volunteers, on the call for three-months men. When the regiment was reorganized, was appointed sergeant. September 20, 1863, at the battle of Chickamauga, was taken prisoner, and held at Richmond, Va., six weeks. Was then transferred to Danville; six weeks afterward made his escape; was recaptured at Salem, and rescued by General Averill's forces the next day' was promoted to first-lieutenant, commanding the company, and served till October 8, 1864; returned to Milwaukee, and began sailing on the lakes in 1866. In 1867, was made master of the schooner "W.H. HINSDALE." Subsequently sailed the schooner "MAPLE LEAF," scow "HUNTER," schooner, "CITY OF TOLEDO," and "ANNIE O. HANSON." Residence, No. 272 Hanover street.

Source: History of Milwaukee County, 1881

 

CAPT. WILLIAM LUND

Master of the schooner, "ALICE B. NORRIS," was born in Norway, July 28, 1845; came to Milwaukee 1847. When 16 years of age went sailing on the lakes with Capt. Sanford on the "JESSE HOYT." Enlisted April 1, 1862, in Co. D, Eighth U.S. Infantry; served three years; was in all the engagements in which his regiment participated. When 21 years of age, was made master of the scow "DAN SICKLES;" sailed her one season; next sailed the schooner "MAPLE LEAF," of which he and his brother George owned a three-fourth interest; sailed this vessel five or six seasons. She was subsequently lost off Grand Haven (1879). Next sailed the schooner "H.B. STEELE," and the scow "CRUSADER." In the Summer of 1878, went to Wilmington, N.C., and took charge of the schooner "JOHN SCHUETTE;" took on a cargo of naval stores, and sailed to Riga, Russia. From there sailed to Portsmouth, England, with a cargo of deals; coasted the east coast of England, and in the Spring of 1879, sailed to Cardiff, Wales, took on a cargo of coals and went to Havana, Cuba; loading with sugar, he sailed to Montreal, taking on a cargo of fine salt at this place, returned to Chicago, arriving in that port September 2, 1879. The sketch of the cruise of the "JOHN SCHUETTE," a Milwaukee vessel, is of interest, showing the distance sailed and amount of business done with her in a little more than a year's time. In 1880, he took command of the "ALICE B. NORRIS." Residence, No. 272 Hanover street.

Source: History of Milwaukee County, 1881

 

MRS. LYNDE

APPALING CALAMITY --- ERIE BURNT.

Loss of one hundred and seventy lives. The Steamboat ERIE is destroyed. The ERIE left Buffalo at 4 P. M. on Monday the 9th inst. For Chicago. She had 200 persons, passengers and crew, on board. Nothing occurred to mar the pleasure of the voyage till 8 o'clock, when the boat was off Silver Creek, eight miles from shore, and thirty-three from Buffalo, when a slight explosion was heard, and immediately the whole vessel was in flames. Captain Titus, who was on deck at the time, rushed to the Lady's cabin to obtain the Life Preservers, of which there were some ninety or one hundred on board, but so rapid had been the progress of the flames that it was impossible to enter the cabin. He then returned and gave orders to stop the engine, as the progress of the boat increased the flames, but the fire prevented it. The steersman was then told to put the helm hard starboard. The boat then swung heavily around towards shore, and the three small boats were ordered out. Two were lowered but in consequence of the heavy sea, and the headway of the boat, both swamped.

We will not attempt to describe the awfully appalling condition of the passengers. Some were frantic with fear, others plunged headlong into the water, others again seized upon any thing buoyant upon which they could lay hands. The small boat forward had been lowered. It was along side the wheel with three or four persons in it, when the captain jumped in, and the boat immediately dropped astern and filled with water. A lady floated by with a life preserver; she called for help. There was no safety in the boat. The captain threw her the only oar in thew boat; she caught the oar and was saved. It was Mrs. Lynde, of Milwaukee, and she was the only lady saved.

In this condition, the boat a mass of fierce fire, and the passengers and crew endeavoring to save themselves by whatever means they could reach--they were found by the CLINTON about 10 P. M. The CLINTON left here in the morning, but in consequence of the wind had put into Dunkirk. She laid there until nearly sunset, at which time she ran out and proceeded as far as Barcelona, when, just at twilight, the fire of the ERIE was discovered, some twenty miles astern. The CLINTON immediately put about, and reached the burning wreck about 10. It was a fearful sight. All the upper works of the ERIE had been burned away. The engine was standing, but the hull was a mass of dull red flames. The passengers and crew were floating around, screaming in their agony and shrieking for help. The boats of the CLINTON were immediately lowered and manned, , and every person that could be seen or heard was picked up, and every possible relief afforded. The LADY, a little boat lying at Dunkirk, went out of the harbor as soon as possible after the CLINTON. It was not thought by the survivors that she saved any. By 1 A. M. all was still but the dead crackling of the fire. Not a solitary individual could be seen on the wild waste of waters. A line was then made fast to the remains of the Erie's rudder, and an effort made to tow the hapless hull ashore. About this time the CHAUTAUQUE came up and lent her assistance. The hull of the ERIE was towed within about four miles of the shore, when it sunk in 11 fathoms water. By this time it was daylight. The lines were cast off. The CLINTON headed for this port, which she reached about six o'clock. Of those who are saved, several are badly burned, but none are dangerously injured, so far as we have heard.

Origin of the fire. -- Among the passengers on board were six painters, in the employ of Mr. G. W. Miller, of this city, who were going to Erie to paint the Steamboat MADISON. They had with them demijohns filled with spirits of turpentine and varnish, and which, unknown to Captain Titus, were placed on the boiler-deck directly over the boilers. One of the firemen who was saved says he had occasion to go on deck, and seeing the demijohns removed them. They were replaced, but by whom it is not known. Immediately previous to the bursting forth of the flames, as several on board have assured us, a slight explosion was heard. The demijohns had probably burst with the heat, and their inflammable contents taking fire instantly, communicated to every part of the boat, which having been freshly varnished, caught as if it had been gunpowder.

Not a paper nor an article of any kind was saved. Of course it is impossible to give a complete list of those on board. Of cabin passengers, Capt. Titus thinks there were between 30 and 40, of whom 10 or 12 were ladies. In the steerage were about 140 passengers, nearly all of whom were Swiss and German emigrants. They were mostly in families with the usual proportion of men, woman and children. The heart bleeds at the thought.

It is a singular coincidence, that the ERIE was burned at almost, identically, the same spot where the WASHINGTON was burned in June 1838, Capt. Brown, who commanded the WASHINGTON at that time, happened to be on board the CLINTON, and was very active in saving the survivors of the ERIE.

Source: Western Herald, (Sandwich, UC), Wednesday, August 18, 1841
(From the Buffalo Commercial Advertiser)