Biographies

From "History of Waukesha County" by Western Historical Company, Chicago 1880

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Henry Ackley

HENRY M. ACKLEY was born in Ellisburgh Jefferson Co., N. Y., in 1828; his father, Gen. Gad Ackley, was a commander of a New York State militia brigade; he was also a captain in the war of 1812; he died in March, 1865; his mother, Mary Pond, was a daughter of Maj. Pond, of Clinton, N. Y.; she died in the spring of 1856. Mr. Ackley came to Wisconsin in January, 1857, and located on a farm a( Oconomowoc; in 1860, he removed to Nashotah Mission, where he was connected with the management of the " Mission" for five years; coming thence, in 1865, to Oconomowoc, he engaged in the drug business and in 1874 he engaged also in the lumber trade, which he has since continued in connection with his drug trade. He married Dec. 29, 1856, in Ellisburg, N. Y., to Miss Permelia Reynolds; she died in 1864, leaving two daughters - Annie and Evangeline. His second marriage was in 1865, to Miss Josephine, daughter of Samuel and Jane (Edwards) Breek; their children are - Samuel B., Gabriella J. D., Mary K and Charles B. Mr. Ackley and family are members of the Episcopal Church.

Rev. Donald R. Anderson

REV. DONALD R. ANDERSON, Pastor of the Congregational Church, was born at Potsdam, St. Lawrence Co., N. Y., in September, 1839; his parents, Austin and Rachel Reed Anderson, were natives of Vermont; they removed from St. Lawrence Co., N. Y., to Allegan Co., Mich., in 1848, and located on a farm, which his father afterward improved, and made his home till his death, which occurred in March, 1877, his mother having died there in December previous. The Rev. Mr. Anderson received an academic education at Ostego, Mich.; in 1860, he went to Illinois City, where he engaged in teaching for one term, then returned to the Academy at Ostego, and completed his studies there in 1861. He enlisted in Co. B, 19th M. V. I., Aug. 9, 1862, and was with the Army of the Cumberland till the spring of 1863, when he was taken prisoner at Thompson's Station, near Franklin. Tenn., and was taken via Columbia and Tullahoma to Richmond, and was held as n prisoner for a month; then paroled in April, 1868, when he returned to his home, and was exchanged about the lst of June; returning then with his regiment to Nashville; they went thence to Murphysboro, where he had a fever, and after lying there in Post Hospital, No. 2, till February, 1864, he came to Kalamazoo, Mich., where he stopped six weeks; April 1, 1864, he reported to Gen. Smith, and was placed in St. Mary's Hospital at Detroit, where he remained till discharged, when he returned to his home broken down in health. He engaged in teaching, during the winters, till his marriage in November, 1867, to Miss Mary L., daughter of Robert and Roxey Averill, a native of Genesee, III. In 1868, he engaged at photography at Dowagiae, Mich., and later at Paw Paw, Mich.; thence he came to East Troy, Walworth Co. Wis, in the spring of 1872, where he began the study of theology, and in the autumn of that year began preaching at Rochester and Waterford, Racine Co. In September, 1873, he entered the Chicago Theological Seminary, and graduated from that institution in May, 1876. During his studies in 1874-75, he preached at Oak Creek, Milwaukee Co., Wis., and after his graduation he was; called to that charge, where he remained till December, 1878, when he came to Oconomowoc. Their children are Leora and Burdis; they lost a son Albert, in August, 1874, aged 6 months, and a little daughter Ethel, Dec. 15, 1879, aged 2 1/2 years. They are buried at East Troy, Walworth Co.

Milton Andrews

MILTON ANDREWS, of the firm of Young & Andrews. manufacturers of wagons and buggies, was born in Wyoming Co., N. Y. in 1835; when he was about 4 years old, his parents, Lyman H. and Mary J. Andrews, removed with him to Plymouth, Ind., where be began his trade in 1860, and afterward continued it in Indiana, Illinois and Michigan till 1859, when he went to Colorado and engaged in mining for a year, returning to Plymouth in the autumn of 1860, where, in the following year, he enlisted in Co. D 9th Ind. V. I., for ninety days; he came to Oconomowoc in the fall of 1861, and re-enlisted in Co. I, 29th W. V. I., in which he was color bearer, and was with his regiment in all its principal movements till the close of the war; was mustered out at Shreveport, La., in 1865; he returned then to Oconomowoc, and worked at his trade for George A. Ludington for ten years; be then engaged in various kinds of business till the spring of 1880, when he formed a copartnership(sic) with Mr. Young. He was married in September, 1868, to Miss Elizabeth Jenkins, a native of Waukesha Co., Wis; their children are Mary J. and Frank.

Chauncy L. Annis

CHAUNCY L. ANNIS, farmer, Sec. 8; P. O. Oconomowoc; was born in Tompkins Co., N. Y., 1819; when 11 years old, he removed with his parents to Cattaraugus Co. Here he remained on the farm until 24 years of age. In September, 1848, he came to Wisconsin, stopped a short time, and then went to Rockford, Ill., where he spent the winter; in the spring of 1844, he returned to Waukesha Co., and entered 123 acres on Secs. 5 and 8, in town of Oconomowoc; a year later, be disposed of this land, and entered 170 acres on Sec. 6, and lived there till the spring of 1847. He then traded his farm for hotel property. at Summit Corners. Here he was engaged in hotel-keeping for eight years. In 1855, he returned to torn of Oconomowoc and purchased a farm of 115 acres on Sec. 8; he now owns a farm of 195 acres on Secs. 8 and 9. He was a member of the Town Board for two terms, and has held the office of Justice of the Peace for twelve years. In 1840, he married Lydia, daughter of Cheney and Sally A. Allen, a native of Erie Co., N. Y.; their children are Elizabeth, now the wife of M. Comstock at Alzona, Iowa; George M., now a farmer at Alzona, Iowa; William W., now a farmer in Kossuth Co., Iowa; Myron A., at home. Mr. and Mrs. Annis are members of the Congregational Church.

Henry J. Baker

HENRY J. BAKER, farmer; was born in Somersetshire, England, March 2, 1822, and is the son of John and Elizabeth Baker. He emigrated to America in 1842, and located in Oneida Co., N. Y., where he engaged in farming and attending school till the spring of 1843; he then came to Wisconsin and located on Sec. 1, town of Oconomowoc, where he made his home as one of the pioneers till 1875; he then removed to the city of Oconomowoc, where he has since lived, though he still retains his farm of 244 acres on Secs. 1 and 2 of the town. He was a voter at the first town elections of Oconomowoc, and was a member of the Town Board in 1863-64. He was married Feb. 14, 1846, to Miss Ann, daughter of James and Ellen Lawson, a native of the Isle of Man, born Aug. 9, 1823, and came to Wisconsin in the spring of 1845; their children are George J., born Dec. 21, 1847, now a farmer in Kossuth Co., Iowa; Ella J, born May 3, 1849, now wife of William Goodyear, lives at Kerwin, Kan.; William H., born April 8, 1851, now on the farm in this town; Eunice A., born Nov. 17, 1852, also on the farm in Oconomowoc; Elizabeth C., born Sept. 25, 1854, now the wife of John D. Carlott, and lives at Chicago, Ill. Mr. and Mrs. Baker and family are connected with the M. E. Church.

Alexander Bartlett

ALEXANDER BARTLETT, house and sign painter; was born in the town of Mendon, Monroe Co., N. Y., in 1837; his father, John Bartlett, was a native of Vermont, and came to Italy, Yates Co., N. Y., when 16 years old, and later to Monroe Co.; his mother, Mary Price, was a native of New York. In 1848, they came to Wisconsin and located at Milwaukee; three months later, they removed to Waukesha, Wis., hence, in the spring of 1849, to the town of Concord, Jefferson Co.; in 1862, they came to Oconomowoc, and, in 1864, removed to the town of St. Frances, Waukesha Co., Wis., where his father died in 1871, his mother still lives in that county. Alexander began the painter's trade with his father when 14 years old, and has followed it since that time at Oconomowoc. Wis., St. Paul, Minn., and Chicago. He was married Aug. 26, 1863, to Mary, a daughter of John and Ellen Truesdell, a native of Vermont, and came with her parents to Wisconsin, in 1841 or 1842; their children are John Wesley; James, deceased, Alexander, Frank, deceased; Ella; Mabel, deceased; George, William, Mary and Lester.

E. B. Birchard

E. B. BIRCHARD, dry goods merchant; was born at Utica, N. Y., in 1814; his parents, Andrew and Elisabeth (Frasier) Birchard, were natives of Connecticut, and both died when he was young, at the age of 16 years, he began clerking in a score at Saugerties, Ulster Co., but afterward removed to Catskill. Green Co., N. Y., where he continued the same line of business till 1845; emigrating then to Waukesha, Waukesha Co., Wis., be engaged in the dry goods trade, which he carried on there till 1860, when he removed to Oconomowoc, opened a store, and has since continued that line of merchandising. He was married at Troy, N. Y., in 1842, to Miss Sophia, daughter of James and Sophia Beem, a native of Catskill, N. Y.; she died at Waukesha, Wis., in 1848. leaving one daughter - Caroline F., now the wife of E. K. Holton, and lives at St. Louis, Mo.

Henry Birdsell

HENRY BIRDSELL, carpenter and joiner; was born in Orange Co., N. Y., Dec. 15, 1822; his father, Morris Birdsell, was a native of Orange Co. N. Y., but his mother. Jane Blauvelt, of New Jersey. When 16 years old, he removed with his parents, to Jefferson Co., N. Y., where in the following year he became apprenticed to the carpenter and joiner's trade, which he has followed most of the time since. He was married in Jefferson Co., N. Y., Aug. 19, 1845, to Miss Sarah A., daughter of Phineas and Phebe Langworthy, a native of that county, born June 20, 1821. October 24, 1849, they arrived as emigrants at Oconomowoc, Wis., where he at once took up his trade. He enlisted at Neosha, Dodge Co., Wis., in October 1863, in the 7th W. B. L. A., under Capt. Lee, of Milwaukee, and was with his battery in the Army of the Cumberland; till mustered out at Milwaukee, Wis., in the spring of 1865; he was wounded at Memphis, Tenn., Aug. 22, 1864, receiving two balls, one through his left lung and passing through his body, the other in the right side and coming out under the collar-bone. Mr. and Mrs. Birdsell have four children - Henry, born in New York, June 14, 1848, now lives in Janesville, Wis; Mary, born March 20, 1852, now the wife of Alonzon H. Wells, and lives at Neosha, Dodge Co., Wis; George M., born in the town of Ashippun, Dodge Co., Jan. 21, 1860; Nettie, born Jan. 19, 1862. Mr. Birdsell has been a member of the l. U. O. F. for twenty-eight years. He was one of the chair members of Lodge No. 48, Oconomowoc.

Frederick Blake

FREDERICK BLAKE, farmer, Sec. 17; P. O. Oconomowoc; was born in the tea of Camden, Oneida Co., N. Y., 1811; when quite young, he began the tanner and shoemaker's trade, with his father, Jesse Blake; after following that trade for some time, he took the carpenter and joiner's trade, which he then followed until 1847, emigrating then to Wisconsin he located in the town of Lagrange, Walworth Co.; in February, 1848, he removed to the town of Oconomowoc and bought eighty acres of land, where be has since resided. He was married in Oneida Co., N. Y., in March, 1837, to Emily, daughter of Ephraim and Temperance (Dunbar) Sanford, a native of that county, born April 19, 1818; they have three children - Mary M., the late wife of Jonas Stabe, of Watertown, Wis., left one son Frederick (also dead); Aurelia T., the late wife of Dr. S. S. Smith, of Eagle, Waukesha, Co., who died, leaving one daughter, Mary E., now with her grandfather, William L., now in Monroe Co., Wis. Mrs. Blake died Aug. 30, 1871. Mr. Blake married the second time Dec. 17, 1873, Zipporah, daughter of Atbol and Anna (Avery) Spoor, a native of Lyons, Wayne Co., N. Y., born 1822, removed at the age of 4 years to Cattaraugus Co., where she was afterward married. Mr. Blake and wife are members of the M. E. Church.

Frederick A. Boyer

FREDERICK A. BOYER, carriage painter; was born in Newton, Fairfield Co. Conn., in October, 1835; he is the son of James and Betsey Boyer, the latter of whom died when he was about a year old. He began the carriage painter's trade at New Haven in 1850, and confined there thirteen years; removing to Troy, N. Y., in 1863, he worked at his trade there till 1865, when be came to Oconomowoc, Wis., and after a visit with his brother here went to Chicago and there continued his trade till 1872, when he returned to Oconomowoc; he worked in the employ of G. A. Ludington four years; in July, 1876, he opened a shop over Mr. Young's carriage shop, on Milwaukee St., and, has since carried on the business there. He was married in 1863, at Madison, Conn., to Ellen M., daughter of Samuel K. Dowd, a native of that place; they have had three children, as follows - Frank A., born in Chicago, March 4, 1868, died there at the age of T months; Charles, born July 19, 1871; Carrie, born August 16, 1874. Mr Boyer is a member of the Masonic fraternity.

Peter Brierton

PETER BRIERTON farmer, Sec. 12; P. O. Mapleton; is a native of County Kildare, Ireland; he is the son of James and San Brierton, born July 1, 1816; emigrating to America in 1850, he settled on Sec. 16, township of Oconomowoc, Waukesha Co., Wis., in October of the same year; continuing the vocation of a farmer there till 1865, he then removed to his present farm on Sec. 16, where be now owns 110 acres. He was married in 1841 to Miss Bridget, daughter of B. and Maria (Ennas) Connor, a native of County Kildare, born in 1815; they have two sons -James, born Dec. 3, 1844, and Brinay, born June 2, 1846. Mr. Brierton's family is connected with St. Catherine's Catholic Church.

Curtis B. Brown

CURTIS B. BROWN, Secs. 22 and 23; P. O. Oconomowoc; was born in the town of Hanover, Grafton Co., N. H., in March, 1806; when be was about 12 years old, his parents, Edward B. and Lucy Brown, removed with him to Washington Co., Vt., where they settled on a farm. He was married in the town of Berlin, Washington Co., Vt., in 1828, to Miss Betsey M., daughter of David and Betsey Johnson, a native of that town, born Sept. 15, 1808, they emigrating the spring of 1834 to Kalamazoo, Mich., and kept tavern there till the spring of 1837, when in April they arrived as the second settlers in the town of Summit, Waukesha Co., Wis. Mrs. Brown is now the only woman living of those who arrived that year; they made that their home till the spring of 1844, when they came to the town of Oconomowoc and located on Sec. 26, where they lived a year, then removed to his present farm on Secs. 22 and 28, where he now owns 280 acres. Mr. Brown has been Chairman of the Town Board two terms, also Assessor two or three years They had nine children, as follows, Martha G., now the wife of Jacob Miller, and lives in the town of New Berlin, Waukesha Co., Wis.; Gustavus L., who died in 1878, leaving a wife and three children, Martha, Clara and Fred; Swain, now living in Russell Co., Kan.; Charles, who died in 1875; Nelson, now living at Leavenworth, Kan.; Mary, now the wife of John Richardson, and lives at Green Bay; Lyman, now in Leavenworth, Kan.; Frank, who is now married and lives with his father; Clement, now at Medford, Taylor Co., Wis.; Mr. and Mrs. Brown are members of the M. E. Church.

Joseph M. Brown

JOSEPH M. BROWN, produce dealer; was born in the town of Nelson, Madison Co., N. Y., Jan. 7, 1816, and is the son of Jabez and Eunice Brown. When 16 years old, he began the carpenter's and joiner's trade, and worked at it there till 1849, when he came to Oconomowoc in September of that year and continued his trade for nine years; he began the butcher trade in 1860, and was interested in that business till 1877, when he went into the commission and produce business. Mr. Brown has been a member of the City Council for two years. He was married in 1840 to Miss Sevilla, a daughter of Edwin Edgerton, a native of Madison Co., N. Y.; they have two daughters - Dorleskie W., the widow of the late David Wilsey; deceased; she has two children, Joseph and Jessie Wilsey; Florence, now a teacher of this county.

Thomas Burns

THOMAS BURNS was born in County Leitrim, Ireland, in 1823, and came to America in 1848; he located in the town of Bristol, Hartford Co., Conn., where he was employed by a railroad company and placed in charge of the storehouse, freight, etc. He was married in 1850 to Mary Kennedy, a native of County Leitrim, Ireland; they emigrated to Wisconsin in 1854, and located at Oconomowoc, where he has since been employed by the C., M. &, St. P. R. R. Company to take charge of freight, etc., etc.; they have had seven children; Charles now in Iowa; John in Kansas; Ellen deceased; Mary A,; Patrick deceased; Thomas; Francis. They are members of St. Jerome's Catholic Church.

Michael M. Bush

MICHAEL M. BUSH, of the firm of Ira Rowell & Sons, is a son of German and Huldah Bush. natives of Vermont, but removed to York State about 1815 or 1816; Mr. Bush was born in Niagara Co., N. Y., in 1832, and spent his earlier life with his parents, on a farm in his native county, till 1854, when he came to Waukesha Co., Wis., and located in the town of Merton, where he followed farming, clerking and teaching for six years; returning, in 1860, to Niagara Co., N. Y., he lived with his father, on the farm, till 1873, when he came again to Waukesha Co., and became a partner in the firm of Ira Rowell & Sons, in the manufacture of farming implements, etc., etc. He was married in January, 1866, to Miss Matilda, a daughter of Ira and Maria Rowell, now of the town of Lisbon, Waukesha Co., Wis., formerly of Livingston Co., N. Y.; their children are Gertrude and Ira. Mrs. Bush and children are members of the Episcopal Church.

Joel R. Carpenter

JOEL R. CARPENTER. attorney at law; was born in the town of Homer, Cortland Co., N. Y., April 3, 1819, and is the second of a family of eight children, five sons and three daughters, seven of whom are now living. His father, Dr. Joel R. Carpenter, was born at Oxford, Grafton Co., N. H., Dec. 4, 1788, and settled in the practice of his profession at Cortland village in 1814, and died there Sept. 16, 1852, his mother. Beulah Butterfield, was born at Canterbury, Conn., May 5, 1799, and died in Chicago, Oct. 14, 1878. Mr. Carpenter received an academic education at Homer, and at the age of 17 began teaching, which he continued for three winters, and attended school during the summers. He began the study law in his native town in the winter of 1839 - 40, and was admitted to the bar in Milwaukee, Wis., in the summer of 1842, shortly after his arrival there in June of that year; he located at Racine in July, 1842, and engaged in the practice of law there till the winter of 1844-45; removing from there in the spring of 1846 to the town of Franklin, Milwaukee Co., he engaged in farming till the autumn of 1848; he then removed to the village of Oconomowoc, where he has since engaged in the practice of his profession. Mr. Carpenter was elected to the office of Justice of the Peace in Oconomowoc in 1850, and was re-elected to that office for several years; he was also City Clerk for a number of years, and in 1863-64 was at one time a member of the Wisconsin Assembly from the Second Assembly District, of Waukesha Co. He was married June 8, 1846, at Toledo, Ohio, to Miss Paulina M. Gibbs, a native of Blandford, Mass., born Dec. 25, 1819; she died at Oconomowoc, Wis., Feb. 20, 1849, leaving two daughters - Paulina, now wife of Dr. A. L. Corey, of Chicago, and Mary A., now Mrs. J. H. Williams, of Chicago. His second marriage was Dec. 25, 1849, to Miss Hannah B., daughter of Levi Stearns, of Oak Creek, Milwaukee Co., Wis., though a native of Goshen, Mass., born July 10, 1880, she died Dec. 2, 1865, leaving six children - Abbie A., now Mrs. James H. Starr, of Chicago; Delford E., now married and lives at Chicago; Marshall W., a printer in Chicago; Irving, clerk in a railroad office of Chicago; Esther R. and George O., at home. He was married again in 1868 to Miss Sarah M., daughter of Alfred Harden, of Oconomowoc, though a native of St. Lawrence Co., N. Y. Mr. Carpenter is a member of the Episcopal Church; his wife of the M. E. Church.

William Chaffee

WILLIAM CHAFFEE, farmer, Sec. 32; P. O. Oconomowoc; was born in the town of Attica, Wyoming Co., Nov. 16, 1817; his parents, William and Rachael Chaffee, were natives of Massachusetts. Mr. Chaffee followed farming in Wyoming Co., N. Y., till 1842, when he emigrated to Wisconsin and located on a farm in the town of Oconomowoc, Waukesha Co., near Okauche Lake, making that his home one and one-half years, he then removed to his present farm of about fifty acres on Sec. 32, where he has since lived. He was married at Attica, N. Y., in 1842, to Miss Caroline Genett, a daughter of Nelson and Oril Beaman, a native of that place; their children are as follows, William H., deceased; Wallace W., now in Chicago; Charles L, now in Lincoln Co., Minn.; Elbert D., now a conductor on the West Wisconsin Railroad; Rosa, now the wife of M. Tuttle, of Oconomowoc; George B., at home. They are members of the M. E. Church.

Gilbert Claflin

GILBERT CLAFLIN (deceased) was born in the town of Sandesfield, Berkshire Co., Mass., Sept. 19, 1822; his father, Joshua Claflin, died when he was quite young; his mother, Maria Kibbie, moved with her infant son to a farm belonging to his uncle, where they made their home till the spring of 1844, whence in June of that year he, with his widowed mother, emigrated to Waukesha Co., Wis.; they located on Sec. 4, town of Summit, where his mother died October, 1878. Mr. Claflin devoted his time to farming, from the time he was old enough, in his native State, and bore his proportion of the hardships in the improvement of Waukesha Co., Wis. He was a member of the Congregational Church for thirty years, and deacon in the same for many years. He was married in 1845 to Miss Esther, daughter of James and Abigail (Metcalf) Colby, a native of Geauga Co., Ohio, born in 1880 and moved with her parents to Cattaraugus Co., N. Y., when quite young, and to Oconomowoc, Wis. in 1848, where her father died in 1869; her mother now lives in Wesley, Iowa. Mr. and Mrs. Claflin bad three children - Elton A., born 1847, at home; Pierce C., born October, 1840, and married to Miss Libbie Montague Oct. 18, 1872; their children are Gilbert, M., Harry E. and Mabel; Alice M., born March, 1866.

Washington W. Collins

WASHINGTON W. COLLINS, agent of the C., M. & St. P. R.R. Co., came to Milwaukee, in October, 1843; he engaged in the mercantile business as a clerk. until he came to Oconomowoc in September, 1844; he then commenced business as a general merchant continued in that business until 1852; since then he has been agent of the C., M. & St. P. R. R. Co.; at this point he was School Commissioner and Town Clerk under the old system; he was Postmaster five years, Supervisor one year, and Mayor two terms. Mr. Collins was born in the town of Craftsburry, Orleans Co., Vt.; he was employed as a clerk in Boston for several years, and also resided in Lowell, Mass., before coming to Wisconsin. He was married March 17, 1847, to Julia A. Campbell, daughter of William Campbell, who came to Oconomowoc in May 1841; she was born in Machias, Cattaraugus Co., N. Y., April, 28, 1884; her people moved to Franklin Co., Ohio, when she was 9 years of age, and came from there to Oconomowoc; they have six children - Sumner J., now of Milwaukee Train Dispatcher of the Prairie du Chien Division of the C., M. & St. P. R. R. Co; Wallace G., of Milwaukee, Train Dispatcher, La Crosse Division of the same road; William W. of Milwaukee, Assistant Train Dispatcher of the Chicago Division of the C., M. & St; P. R. R. Co.; Julia, Kate and Nellie M., reside with their parents; Charles H., is a brakeman on the C., M. & St. P. R. R. Mr. Collins is a member of Blue Lodge A. F. & A. M., he being a charter member of the first Masonic Lodge instituted at Oconomowoc, and has been a member of the Masonic order ever since.

Fred W. Coon

FRED W. COON, the founder, present editor and publisher of the Oconomowoc Local, was born in the town of Christiana, Dane Co., Wis., June 14, 1850; his parents removed from Madison Co., N. Y., while this State was yet a Territory, in 1846, and settled upon the best section of farming lands that could at that early date be found. At that time the wilderness of the county was unbroken save but by the well-worn Indian trails which led from the four lakes at Madison to Lake Koshkonong, which, a few years previous, had been the camping-ground of the famous Indian chief Black Hawk. His earlier days were employed in attending the district school and work upon the farm, until he had attained the age of 13, when he entered Albion Academy for a three years' coarse. In the winter after attaining his 16th year, be taught a district school, and two years later the winter term of the same school. In the summer of 1871, he attended the State University, at Madison, and in the following fall was duly admitted to the Junior class of that institution; he graduated with his class in 1813, receiving the degree of B. S. While a student at the University, he was an active member of the Hesperian Society, representing it at two of its public exhibitions, both as poet and orator. The year following his graduation was spent in teaching and upon the farm. In September, 1874, he removed to Oconomowoc and established the Local, being both editor and publisher. May 3, 1875, he was married to Miss Clara McDougal, a daughter of Geo. W. McDougal, of Madison, Wis.

Alexander Coyle

ALEXANDER COYLE, farmer, Secs. 10 and 11, was born in the city of Glasgow, Scotland, June 8, 1819; his father, William Coyle, was a native of Ireland, his mother, of Scotland. At the age of 20 years, he, with his parents, came to America, and located in County Bathurst; Canada West, where he made his home till 1843, when he and his brother James came to Waukesha Co., Wis., and, cutting their way through the woods from Okauchee to Mapleton, made a claim to his present farm of 320 acres, and also to the 200 acres in Sec. 2. They had considerable trouble with one Richardson about jumping their claim and getting others to claim that in Sec. 2, but in the spring of 1844 Mr. Coyle returned to his father's, in Canada, and got money, with which to enter the land, which after much annoyance, settled the case in court. Mr. Coyle has since lived on his farm in Secs. 10 and 11, and now has 210 acres. He was married Sept. 6, 1847, to Catharine, daughter of James and Mary Butler, a native of Canada, but her parents of County Wexford, Ireland; their children are Helen, born July 2, 1848, now the wife of John Quissee, and lives in Concord, Jefferson Co., Wis.; Mary, born Feb. 7, 1850, now lives in Minneapolis, Minn.; William, born May 6, 1852, now in Oconomowoc; Anna, born May 24, 1854, now the wife of John Fay, and lives in Vernon Co., Wis.; Alexander, born April 10, 1856, now in Leadville; Charlotte, born May 7, 1858, still at home; Peter, born Aug. 2, 1860; Mrs. Coyle died Dec. 10, 1865. His second marriage was Dec. 26, 1866, to Miss Jane, daughter of Bernard and Jane Dugan, a native of County Antrim, Ireland, born Feb. 1, 1838; she came to Philadelphia in 1859, and to Milwaukee, Wis., in 1861; their children are Josephine, born Dec. 6, 1869; Elizabeth, born July 6, 1871, died March 18, 1872; Joseph, born Dec. 22, 1872; Catharine, born Dec. 11, 1874, died April 6, 1878; Elizabeth, born July 20, 1878; Catharine, born Dec. 7, 1879. Mr. Coyle's family are members of the Catholic Church.

William Coyle

WILLIAM COYLE, of the firm of Nash & Coyle, manufacturers and dealers in boots and shoes, was born in Mapleton, Waukesha Co., Wis., in 1854, and in 1875 he began the shoemaker's trade, with his partner, Mr. Nash, and in August, 1879, formed a copartnership with him in the business. He was married, August, 1876, to Miss Ella Fogarty, of Oconomowoc; they have two children, Clara and Alexander. They are members of St. Jerome's Catholic Church.

R.S. Dale, M.D.

R. S. DALE, M. D. homeopathic physician; was born in Seneca Co., N. Y., in 1844; his parents removed with him to Sonora, Steuben Co., when he was only 5 years old, where he afterward received an academic education; he came to Wisconsin in 1861, and located at Oshkosh, where he began the study of medicine with his brother, then a practicing physician of that city; returning to New York after a fourteen months' stay at Oshkosh; he came again to Wisconsin and settled in the practice of his profession at Omro, Winnebago Co.; he joined the State Medical Society, passed his examination and received his diploma from society in 1868; he removed to Eau Claire, Wis, in 1869, and practiced medicine there till 1874, when he came to Oconomowoc, and has since continued the practice of his profession. He was married at Eau Claire, in 1873, to Miss Ella, daughter of William P. Butterfield, a native of Allegany Co., N. Y.; they have one daughter, Edna B. Mr. and Mrs. Dale are members of the Congregational Church. The Doctor is a member of the I. O. O. F.

Martin Z. Dibble

MARTIN Z. DIBBLE, carpenter and joiner; was born in Jefferson Co., N. Y., in 1880, and came with his parents, Jasper and Harriet Dibble, to Mackinaw Island, whence, in December, 1840, they came to Oconomowoc, Wis., and located in the village opposite the Draper Hall. His father became employed by J. S. Rockwell & Co., and remained in their employ, more or less of the time, till his death, which occurred in 1857; his mother now lives at Columbus, Wis. Mr. Z. began the butcher's trade in 1845, and followed that till 1854 or '55, after which he was engaged in various kinds of business till 1864, when he enlisted in Co. C. 43d W. V. I., under Col. Cobb, was with the Army of the Tennessee and Mississippi, and was mustered out at Nashville, Tenn., and discharged at Milwaukee in 1865. He then returned to Oconomowoc and has since followed the carpenter and joiner's trade. He was married in 1869, to Eliza Knox, a native of Pennsylvania, and came to Wisconsin in 1854; their children are, Adelaide, Minnie, George, Harry, Fred and Blanche. They are members of the M. E. Church.

Martin T. Draper

MARTIN T. DRAPER was born in Uxbridge, Worcester Co., Mass., Aug. 22d, 1814, and lived in Massachusetts until became to Milwaukee in November 1843; lived there eight years, and in Portage nine years, he came to Oconomowoc fourteen years ago. Mr. Draper has been proprietor of Draper Hall, Oconomowoc, for the last ten years, County Commissioner for four years, Mayor three terms, and is now serving as Mayor. He was married in 1835 to Caroline Watson, in Massachusetts, who was born in Leicester, Mass.; she died in 1841, leaving two children - Edward F., now a merchant of Delaware City, Cornelia M., now of Worcester, Mass. His present wife was Caroline Calkins, of Milwaukee; they were married in July, 1844; they have one son and a daughter, Mary, and Charles B., son of Frost and Mary Thayer Draper. Before entering into the hotel business, he was agent for capitalists in entering lands and selling the same, and looking after investments for other parties; while in Milwaukee, this was his principal business. At Portage he sold goods, acted as trustee and assignee for various estates. He is one of the most enterprising and public spirited citizens of Oconomowoc. His grandfather, David Draper, was one of the first patriots to enlist in defense of the rights of the colonies, and fought at Bunker Hill and in subsequent battles. In running for office, Mr. Draper has always polled a large vote; living in a Republican city, he has been elected by a large majority to serve as Mayor for three terms, showing the appreciation of his ability and integrity as a representative of the people in the important position to which he has so often been elected. In politics, he has always been Democratic. Mr. Draper is as popular as a landlord, as he is a citizen. Oconomowoc has become popular as a summer resort, and Draper' Hall, open during the whole year, is usually crowded during the summer months. The natural attractions of Oconomowoc are unsurpassed, and Mr. Draper has done more than any other man to make it a favorite resort during the summer months; his house is situated between Fowler and La Belle lakes, his grounds extending to both. Before coming west, Mr. Draper was engaged in trading, sometimes in West India goods, dry goods, and at other times in lumber and coal in different parts of Massachusetts He received only a common school education, but he had a taste for mercantile pursuits, and consequently engaged quite extensively in the trading mentioned, before coming West.

H.R. Elderkin, M.D.

H. R. ELDERKIN, M. D., was born at New Albany, Ind., in 1833, and is the son of Lathrup (a lawyer) and Martha E. Elderkin. The doctor began the study of medicine with Dr. William Cooper, of New Albany, in 1858, and after pursuing his studies there for three years be entered, in 1856, the medical department of the University of Louisville, Ky., from which he graduated in 1858; be came, shortly after completing his studies, to Oconomowoc, Wis. Having been a student at Nashotah Mission when a boy, he was favorably impressed with this country. He formed a co-partnership with Dr. H. H. Warner, in the practice of medicine, and in the drug business - Dr. Warner having opened the first drug store in the village some years before that time. After practicing in this vicinity for a few years, the doctor removed to Waterville, where he continued practice till the winter of 1866-67, except a part of the years of 1864-65, when he offered his services to the United States Government, and was placed in charge of Hospital No. 11, at New Albany, Ind. He spent the winter of 1866-67 as a student at Bellevue Hospital, of New York, and in June, 1868, he settled in the practice of his profession at Fort Howard, Brown Co., Wis. Ten years later, he removed to Milwaukee, whence, in February, 1880, he returned to Oconomowoc, where he has been engaged in the general practice of his profession. He was married Oct. 21, 1862, to Miss Ann E., daughter of Samuel and Martha J. Breck, of Oconomowoc; their children are Laura P., born Jan. 8, 1865; Anna R., born Sept. 17. 1868; Philazamia H., born Jan. 25, 1876. The doctor and his family are members of the Episcopal Church.

E.E. Ely

E. E. ELY, retired; son of Joseph and Annie Nicholson Ely, was born in Bucks Co., Penn., in 1887. He came to Oconomowoc in 1856, and began clerking for J. S. Rockwell in a general store, and continued with him as clerk till his death, after which he remained with the stock of goods then on hand for a time; he began the hardware trade in 1868, and continued that business till the spring of 1879. Mr. Ely was City Treasurer of Oconomowoc in 1879. He was married in 1869, to Miss Eleanor, daughter of B. B. Frances Babcock, a native of Pennsylvania, who died Sept. 29, 1879, leaving one son, Edward E., born Jan. 4, 1871; they had a daughter, Mabel--she was born and died in 1873. Mrs. Ely was a member of the Episcopal Church.

Henry Erredge

HENRY ERREDGE, proprietor of blacksmith shop; was born in the city of London, July 10, 1828; son of George and Sophia (Reed) Erredge. He sailed for America in 1845, and landed in New York City, May 22, that year; in June following, reached Waukesha, Wis.; thence, after a short stay, be went to Lake Five, where he stopped with an uncle on the farm till fall; returning then to Waukesha, he was employed a few weeks, by Bacon & Block, wagon manufacturers, after which he worked at the baker's trade, with George Head, of that place, for about a year; going again to Lake Five, for a short time, he then went to Milwaukee, where. in the spring of 1847, he joined the 15th U. S. R. A., under Col. Morgan. They were soon ordered to Newport, Ky.; thence, via New Orleans and Vera Cruz, to the City of Mexico; was discharged at Covington, Ky., Aug, 4, 1848. Returning then via Milwaukee and Lake Five to Waukesha, in the fall of 1848, he became apprenticed to the blacksmith's trade, with Clinton & Poole, and remains with them till the spring of 1851, when he came to Oconomowoc, and, with Henry Nenrin, rented a shop and carried on the blacksmith trade here; till November, 1850; be then went again to Waukesha, but failed to find employment at his trade, so went to grading on the M. & M. R. R., and in February, 1851, got a position in the railroad shops at Waukesha, where he remained till the shops were removed to Milwaukee; going to Chicago in 1853, he found work for three or four months, with Gates & McKnight, after which he returned to Waukesha, and worked for Case & Pulling, at building and ironing cars for the M. & M. R. B. Co.; in the winter of 1853-54, he went to Lake Five, and started a shop for himself, which he continued till the spring of 1859; he then started for Pike's Peak, and got as far as Plattsmouth, when he became discouraged, and returned to Genesee, Wis., where he bought a blacksmith and wagon shop, and carried on the business, under the firm of Erredge & West, till 1862, when he joined the Quartermaster's Department, Army of the Potomac, and remained in the South till the battle of the Wilderness; were then ordered back to Alexandria, Va.; then, two weeks later, to White House Landing; was discharged at City Point, Va., in 1864. He then returned to Genesee, Wis., but soon re-engaged with the government, and was sent to Nashville, Tenn., in 1865, but on account of sickness, was soon forced home again. He engaged in merchandising, till the spring of 1866, when, May 15, he started for Montana Territory; he joined Capt. Pick at St. Paul, went thence with a team of six cows and oxen yoke of oxen via Fort Benton to Helena City, Montana, where they arrived in October, making the trip in 100 days. He, with two others, bought a claim at "Dry Gulch," and engaged in mining, but met with no success till the winter of 1867, when, with Mr. Foroute, he bought a claim at "'Tucker Gulch," where they realized $100 per day, for a time. Refusing $10,000 for their claim, they worked it about a year, and left it without a penny. He then worked at his trade at Helena City, till 1869, when he came again to Waukesha, Wis. In October, 1869, he went to Omaha, Neb., bought a third interest in a railroad hotel, which burned in May, 1870, leaving him again penniless. After a visit to Waukesha, he then went to San River, Montana, where he worked at his trade till July, 1873, when he received an injury from a kick of a horse, and returned to Ft. Benton; there he, with six others, bought a small steamer, and sailed down the Missouri River to Bismark, Neb., then the terminus of the Northern Pacific Railroad; there he took the train for St. Paul;. thence down the river to St. Louis, Mo.; thence to Oconomowoc, and engaged with I. Bowell & Sons in the foundry, till June, 1876, when he became proprietor of his present shop. He was married, Nov. 3, 1875, to Hannah M., daughter of H. G. Jones, of this city; they have one daughter, Eliza; he has one son, George H., by a former marriage. Mr. Erredge has been a member of the Masonic fraternity for 20 years; he is now Master of the Ellsworth Lodge, No. 133.

John Everson

JOHN EVENSON, molder for I. Rowell & Sons, was born in Norway, July 24, 1833; he began the trade of a molder when 18 years old, and continued it there till 1862, when he came to America and located at Oconomowoc, and has worked at, his trade here since; he 'began work for L Rowell & Sons in 1868. He was married in Norway in 1862, to Miss Anna Gunderson, who died at Oconomowoc, Wis., May 7, 1875, leaving four children - Inger, Sophia, Eliza and Eddie. Mr. Evenson is a member of the Scandinavian Norwegian Church.

John Fallon

JOHN FALLON, blacksmith; was born in County Roscommon, Ireland, May 8, 1820; when 17 years old, he began the blacksmith trade with his father, Edmund Fallon, and continued it there for about five years; he emigrated to America in 1843, and followed his trade at Boston, Mass., till 1850, whence be came to Waukesha, Wis., and carried on his trade there twenty years; in November, 1870, he removed to Oconomowoc, and has since continued his trade here. Mr. Fallon has held the office of County Treasurer one term; was President of the Village Board one term, and several terms a member of that body; has also been a member of the City Council, and is now a member of the County Board of Supervisors, from the First Ward of the city of Oconomowoc; he has held other minor offices in the city. He was married at. Waukesha, Wis., in 1853, to Miss Catherine Coyle, a native of Cranston, R. I; their children are - Winifred, now Mrs. John Williams, and lives at Piperville, Wis.; Mary J. and Nellie A.. now teachers in the Oconomowoc public schools; Elizabeth, Edmund, Esther, Gerald, Malachi and Peter J. Mr. Fallon and family are members of the Catholic Church.

Horace H. Fay

HORACE H. FAY, baggage master; son of Waterman B. and Ruth M. Fay; was born in the town of Conway, Berkshire Co., Mass., Dec. 6, 1835; when a mere babe, his parents removed with him to Dexter, Livingston Co., Mich., whence, in 1849, they came to Oconomowoc, locating in the village; he began clerking for his uncle, G. W. Fay, in dry goods store, and remained with him three or four years, after which he was employed as toll-gate keeper at Hartland till 1854. At the grading of the railroad from Milwaukee to Oconomowoc, he was employed by Fay & Collins on the work for one summer; then worked at farming for his uncle some time. In 1859, he began farming in the town of Ixonia, Jefferson Co., which he continued till 1868, when he removed to the village of Oconomowoc, where, in 1872, be became employed as baggage master for the C., M. &. St. P. R. R. Co. He was married Nov. 6,1859, to Mrs. Eunice A., widow of V. B. Campbell and daughter of Moses and Eleanor Kittle, a native of Wyoming Co., N. Y. Born in 1838 and came to Wisconsin with parents in 1849. Their children are George O., born Aug. 28, 1860, now married and lives in city of Oconomowoc; Charles, born Dec. 9, 1862; Lizzie A., born Aug. 4. 1868, Katie, born April 21, 1871; Harry, born Feb. 8, 1878. Mr. Fay is a member of the Masonic fraternity.

Waterman B. Fay

WATERMAN B. FAY (deceased) was the son of Putnam and Elizabeth Fay, and was born at Brighton, Mass., Sept. 4, 1809, and died June 4, 1879. making his age 69 years and 9 months; his early years were spent in the quiet but laborious duties of farm life; his early training was such as developed those manly traits of character for which he was so dearly beloved by those who deeply mourn his loss, and which won for him the high regard of all who knew him; he was one of the earliest settlers of this western clime, having left his eastern home in 1835 to seek his fortune, with his faithful companion, in this then wilderness world; he first, located in Michigan, at Dexter, Livingston Co.; there he remained until the fall of 1849, when he moved to this place; he resided in the village until the following June, when he moved on to the farm now occupied by Mr. Gibbs, southwest of this city; there he remained for a term of years, and then moved into and took charge of the toll house connected with the plank road; after residing there a number of years, he went to the Campbell farm at the foot of the lake; next he removed into the village, where he was mail messenger for thirteen years and never missed but one trip to the train till disease confined him to his bed. He was married Aug. 28, 1833, to Ruth M., daughter of Levi sad Phylinda (Warren) Parsons, of Brighton, Mass.; by whom he had four children - Horace H., now in Oconomowoc, George now in Nevada; Martha W., born May 4, 1840, died May 16, 1840, Mary R, born January 4, 1844, died January 8, 1844. His family consisted of a devoted wife, who was faithful in the highest degree to the very last, and two sons, one of whom fills the position of freight agent at our depot, while the other has sought his fortune in Nevada. Mr. Fay united with the Congregational Church of this city May 1, 1864; in the last month of his life, he was led to feel and acknowledge his shortcomings and remissness in duty, and to rejoice that he was brought "back to his Father's house," there to receive anew the righteous garb, to receive the ring of the Father's approval, and to partake of the rich repast prepared for every returning prodigal; he was a great, yet ever-patient sufferer, and all who saw him in his last days will witness to the fact that he exemplified the spirit of the religion he possessed in a wonderful manner. Not a murmur escaped his lips, but his common expression was, " All is well." The last expression his Pastor heard him make was, " Bless the Lord." We laid his emaciated form on yonder hillside, but long hours before the angels had borne his weary spirit to the beautiful land beyond. "Let me die the death of the righteous, and let my last end be like his."

George W. Fay

GEORGE W. FAY was born in Brighton, Middlesex Co., Mass., July 9, 1811; came from Boston to Milwaukee, where he was employed in the mercantile business from 1842 to 1844; then went to Oconomowoc in July, 1844, and engaged in general merchandising and farming; he was with W. W. Collins six years; then Mr. Pay went on a farm for one and one-half years; then he returned to Oconomowoc; twenty-three years ago, he purchased the LaBelle House, conducted the house nine years; he has not been engaged in active business for several years, at the present time he is one of the Aldermen representing the Second Ward in the City Council; has held the position at other times; Mr. Fay broke the first ground in the place; the first brick building, where Draper Hall is now located, was erected and owned by Mr. Fay. He was married in Woburn, Mass., June 17, 1884, to Abby P. Tufts, a native of Medford, Mass. She died Sept. 22, 1841, leaving two children - George P., born July 19, 1836, now proprietor of a hotel at Bushnell, Ill.; Abby L. P., born Aug. 29, 1841, now Mrs. E. B. Parsons, of Milwaukee. Mr. Fay was married a second time to Abby S. Collins, Aug. 10, 1843; she died June 4, 1846. and left no children. The present wife of Mr. Fay was Rebecca A. Parsons; they were married Sept. 30, 1847, at Monroe, Wis; Mrs. Parsons was born in Bangor, Me; they have two children - William B., born Sept. 19, 1849 (proprietor of a livery establishment in Oconomowoc), and Mary E., born Sept. 14, 1854; both were born opposite the place where Draper Hall now stands.

James Ferguson

JAMES FERGUSON, dealer in ladies' furnishing goods, was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, in 1850; his parents, James and Esther Ferguson, both died when he was quite young, his father when he was 2 years old, and his mother when he was 6. Mr. Ferguson came to Oconomowoc in 1865, and in 1871 be began the jewelry trade in Milwaukee, which he followed for two years; returning to Oconomowoc in 1873, he followed farming for seven years, and in February 1880, sold his farm and began dealing in ladies' furnishing goods. He was married in 1871 to Miss Elizabeth Goetz, a native of Germany; their children are Daisie, James, Gussie and Lulu.

John Ferry

JOHN FERRY, farmer, Sec. 23, P. O. Oconomowoc, was a native of the town of Amherst, Hampshire Co., Mass. He is the son of Aaron and Elizabeth Ferry, born in 1815; when he was 17 years old his parents removed to Portage Co., Ohio, where he lived on a farm for six years. He was married there in June, 1837 to Miss Betsy, a daughter of Henry and Susan Convers, a native of Vermont, but removed to Ohio in 1832; in October, 1889, they started far Wisconsin, and landed in Milwaukee the 20th of that month, and reached the village of Oconomowoc in December, where they settled; five years later they removed to a farm on the southeast quarter of Sec. 28, where they made their home till March, 1872. He was then appointed Superintendent of the State experimental farm at Madison, for four years; after which they lived at Watertown, Wis., till the fall of 1879, when they returned to the town of Oconomowoc, Waukesha Co., and located on Sec. 23, they have six children, Harriet, born in Ohio in April, 1839, now the wife of S. E. Whitney, and lives in California; Charles H., born in the village of Oconomowoc Jan. 16, 1841, the first white child born in the village; he now lives in Watertown, Wis.; Ann, born at Oconomowoc Oct. 31, 1842; William D., born at Oconomowoc December 3, 1844, now lives in the village; Edgar J., born July 11, 1846, now a jeweler at Postville, Iowa; John G., born in April, 1854, now a jeweler at Columbus, Wis. Mr. Ferry's family is connected with the Congregational Church.

John Forra

JOHN FORRA, farmer, Secs. 25 and 26; P. O. Oconomowoc; was born in Norway in 1823; his mother died when he was quite young; his father, having saved a wealthy gentleman from drowning, afterward, as a reward, received a pension from him for life. Our subject made his home with his father at Brasper, till 1848, when he sailed for America and located in the town of Merton, Waukesha Co., Wis., working for the farmers for seven years; he then bought a farm of thirty acres in Sec. 26, in the town of Oconomowoc, and now owns, in addition to the above, 150 acres in Sec. 25 and 35 of the same town. He was married in 1851 to Eliza Martina Hanstatter, a native of Norway. He came to Wisconsin in 1849. They have one daughter, Josephine, now the wife of William Peterson, who lives with her parents.

Peter Forsyth

PETER FORSYTH was born in Norway in 1821, and lived with his father, Nelson Forsyth, on a farm till 1843, when he came to America; landing in New York City, July, 1848; he came in the following August to Oconomowoc, and lived on farm in the town of Summit near the village of Oconomowoc, a short time; then removed to the town of Ixonia, Jefferson Co,, and lived on a farm of 112 acres on Sec. 1, till the autumn of 1876, when he removed again to Oconomowoc, where he has since resided. He was married in 1847 to Miss Olive Lee, a native of Norway, but came to New York in 1839, and to Waukesha Co., Wis., in spring of 1844; their children are Nicholas, now on the farm in Ixonia; Olaf, now a resident of Pierce Co., Wis., Anton, in Pierce Co. John, deceased; Melia and Herman at home. They are members of the Lutheran Church.

George W. Fulmer

GEORGE W. FULMER, farmer, Sec. 19; P. O. Oconomowoc; was born in Oswego Co., N. Y., 1828; at the age of 20 years, he began the cooper's trade in his native county, which he continued until 1845; he then emigrated to Wisconsin and entered 40 acres of land on Sec. 19, Oconomowoc Town. He built a cooper shop on his farm and worked at his trade for the next twenty years; since that time he has been engaged in farming and brick-making. He was married in 1848, to Betsey, the daughter of William and Caroline Martin, a native of Canada; the children of this union are Richard, now at home; Mary, now the wife of Edward Morgan, lives in the town of Oconomowoc; Adelia, the wife of M. Thompson, lives in Oconomowoc; Washington, resides in town of Oconomowoc; Thomas, in the town of Merton, and Charles, at home. When Mr. Fulmer came in, he had to open the road from his house to Oconomowoc.

Thomas C. Fulmer

THOMAS C. FULMER, carpenter and joiner, was born in Cayaga Co., N, Y., in 1826; when 16 years old, he began the carpenter and joiner's trade, and followed it in his native county till 1854, when be removed his parents to Waukesha Co., Wis., and located them at the foot of La Belle Lake, in the town of Oconomowoc; in the following year, he moved his own family from Cayuga Co., N. Y., to Wisconsin, and settled in the village of Oconomowoc, where he has since continued his trade, and has been connected with the erection of some of the most prominent buildings of the city, among them two stores for John Metcalf, one for K D. Parsons, a residence for Dr. Miller, Lardner and others. He was married in 1848, to Miss Cynthia W. daughter of R. and Almira Dutcher, a native of Oswego Co., N. Y.; their children are George G., now a resident of the town of Oconomowoc; Ralph V., now in Walnut, Crawford Co., Kan.; Grave G., now at Sheboygan, Wis., Wyman F., at Oshkosh; Grant 8., at home. Mr. and Mrs. Palmer attend the Congregational Church.

Carl S. Gasmann

CARL S. GASMANN, farmer, Sec. 1; P. O. Mapleton; was born in Norway in 1819, and emigrated to America in 1843 with his parents, Hans and Christina (Peterson) Gasman; they located at Pine Lake, Waukesha Co., though they purchased land in the town of Ashippun, Dodge Co., where his father died in 1857; his mother at his home in the town of Oconomowoc is 1846. Carl S. made his home with his father a year after the settlement in Dodge Co., then began working for farmers end others, teaming, etc., etc., till 1849, when he crossed the plains to California and there spent eight Wis., to which they cut their way through the woods from Stove Bank, removed in the spring of 1844, months at mining; returning then to Wisconsin, he located on a farm in Sec. 1, town of Oconomowoc, Waukesha Co., part of which his father had entered in 1844 or '45. This he has since made his home, and now has 140 acres on Sec. 1 and 2. Mr. Gasmann has been a member of the Town Board several terms. He was married May 4, 1855, to Mary C., daughter of Abraham and Inger Martinson, a native of Norway, born in October, 1833, and came with his parents to Wisconsin in 1845; their children are, Henry, now in Dakota Co., Minn.; Alfred, now a shoemaker at Stone Bank, Waukesha Co.; Charles, John and Annie at home. Mr. Gasmsnn's family is connected with the Episcopal Church.

John Gruett

JOHN GRUETT, farmer, Sec. 20; P. O. Oconomowoc; was born in Prussia in 1839; was occupied in farming in his native land until 1864, when he emigrated to America, going to Waterloo, Jefferson County, where he stayed until the spring of I866. He then returned to Prussia, and after a 14-months' stay, came back to Wisconsin, and in the fall of 1869 bought the farm of 70 acres where he now lives He was married, Nov. 3, 1869, to Albertina Buske, a native of Prussia, who came to Wisconsin in 1866. They have two sons, Robert end Charles.

Herman Grulke

HERMAN GRULKE, farmer, Secs. 16 and 17; P. O. Oconomowoc; was born in Prussia, Jan. 19, 1815; came to America in 1862, and settled in the town of Ixonia, Jefferson Co., Wis.; the following year, he moved to the town of Oconomowoc. He now owns where he is living, 118 acres. He was married in 1845, to Wilhelmina Grasch, a native of Prussia. Their children are Elias, Albert, Amelia, Bernhard and Mena. They are members of the Lutheran Church.

Abner B. Hall

ABNER B. HALL was born in Oneida Co., N. Y., in 1810; at the age of 15 years, he began the tailor's trade, which he followed in Oneida County till 1833; removing then to Wyoming Co,, N. Y., he continued it there for ten years. He emigrated to Wisconsin in 1843, and located at Oconomowoc, where he worked at his trade for three years. In 1846, he settled on a farm in the Town of Summit, where he followed agriculture and stock raising till 1863; when he returned to the village of Oconomowoc and has been engaged in various kinds of business. Mr. Hall was Street Commissioner for eight years; a member of City Council from Second Ward one term. He was married April 7, 1831, to Miss Emily, a daughter of Hezekiah B. Round, of Newport, Herkimer Co., N. Y., but a native of Massachusetts, born in 1809. Their children are Hayden H.,who served three years as a soldier during the rebellion; was killed by the bursting of a steam boiler at Burnet, Burnet Co., Texas, Jan. 1, 1880; James J., who enlisted in Company C, 28th W. V. I., in 1862, and served with his regiment in all its principal battles and movements till the close of the war; he is now a resident of this city.

William Hamler

WILLIAM HAMLER was born near Tallahassee, Fla., Nov. 11, 1846; lived there until he was 6 years of age; was then sent, to New York; here he attended school until his 14th year, when his mother died; then his father sent him to the military school on Governor's Island for three years; in January, 1861, he left school and went to Augusta, Me., then to his old home, and from there to New Orleans, getting there a short time before the first proclamation of President Lincoln; then, an account of the danger surrounding him, he went to Washington, and for a time, worked in the Government Printing Office, having began that trade while at Governor's Island; during the next four years, he traveled far and near, working though the Eastern States; came to Chicago in 1876, and engaged on the Inter Ocean; from there he went to Milwaukee in 1877, and after working on various papers in the State, finally anchored where he now is - foreman of the Oconomowoc Free Press.

Charles M. Hartwell

CHARLES M. HARTWELL, farmer, was born in New Hampshire, in 1820. His parents, Simon and Thusta (Williams) Hartwell, were natives of New York; they removed in the spring of 1825, in a wagon, to Cleveland, Ohio, it then being a small village of log houses. Located on a farm near there, he devoted his time to agriculture and dairying till 1844. He then spent five months in traveling with Judge Hayward, over the Alleghany Mountains, after which he returned to his home at Cleveland, and remained on the farm for awhile. He then began clerking in a paper-hanging store, where he remained till 1846, when he went to Cincinnati and was engaged in bottling and selling mineral water for two years Coming to Oconomowoc to visit a sister in 1848, he spent five months in this county, being favorably impressed with the advantages of the new country. Returning to Cincinnati in January, 1849, he engaged extensively in the mineral water trade till 1856, 'when he came to Milwaukee, and there followed painting and paper-hanging till 1858; he then came to Oconomowoc and began dealing in boots and shoes, which he continued till May, 1872, and in the following autumn was elected Sheriff of Waukesha County. His term expiring. in January, 1876, he returned to Oconomowoc, and has since engaged in farming. He was elected Chairman of the Town Board in April, 1880, and has held several minor offices in the town and city. Be was married November 3, 1850, to Miss Henrietta J., daughter of Andrew and Jane (Tucker) Anderson, a native of Lawrenceburg, Ind., her father, of New Jersey, and died at Lawrenceburg, Jan. 1, 1848; her mother of New York City, and after the death of her father married Mr. Robert Hobbeus, and lives in Pennsylvania. Their children are Charles A., now of Rock Island, Ill. Ida J., now the wife of E. H. Berry, and lives at Rock Island, Ill. Naomi Emma, deceased; May, deceased; Ella B.; Jennie, deceased; Mabel. Mr. Hartwell's family attend the Methodist Church.

David Hastings

DAVID HASTINGS was born in Hampshire Co., Mass., Sept. 18, 1812; and is the son of Lucius and Olive (Smith) Hastings. He began the cabinet-maker's trade at the age of 15 years, and, after working at that for two years, he took the shoemaker's trade, which he continued most of the time till 1842. He was married Brattleboro, Vt., July 24, 1833, to Miss Mary Smith Sprague, daughter of Oliver and Martha Sprague nee Rogers, a native of Easthampton, Hampshire Co., Mass., born in 1808. Mr. Hastings came with his brother to Wisconsin in Nov., 1842, and located on a farm on Sec. 32, where his wife and family joined him in June following; he built his present home in 1851, for a tavern and kept it as a public house for seven years; after which he devoted his attention wholly to farming till 1868. He has since lived a more retired life. They have had eight children, as follows, Olive, who died in Deerfield, Mass.; Lucius, now at Plymouth, Iowa; Martha, now the widow of the late Thomas A. Jones, deceased. she lives at Greenville, Mich.; William, who enlisted in Company E, 16th W. V. I., died at Shiloh, April 8, 1862; Henry C., enlisted in Company E, 16th W. V. I., died at Shiloh April 29, 1862; Sarah E., now the wife of F. W. Weber of this city; Eliza, deceased; Horace, now in Plymouth Co., Iowa.

Horace Hastings

HORACE HASTINGS, retired, was born in Amherst, Hampshire Co., Mass., in 1814; his father dying when he was young, he removed with his grandfather at the age of 14 years to Franklin Co., Mass., where he spent most of his time at farming till 1843, when he came to Oconomowoc, but soon located on a farm on Sec. 25, in the town of Ixonia, Jefferson Co., Wis, which was his home till 1869, when he removed to the village of Oconomowoc, but continued to manage his farm till 1877, when he disposed of it. Having lost his sight in 1852, he has amused himself much of the time by making puzzles and carving various kinds of implements out of wood that are truly curiosities. He was married in 1839 to Miss Sarah B., daughter of Medad and Ruth Squires, a native of Franklin Co., Mass; born 1816 Mr. and Mrs. Hastings are members of the Congregational Church.

J. Smith Hastings

J. SMlTH HASTlNGS. The name Hastings is of an illustrious family in history. The race to which, it applies is of Danish origin. In the early days of the British Kingdom the Danes made frequent incursions upon that part of England and Scotland bordering upon the North Sea. It was in one of these incursions that Hastings, a Danish chief, made himself formidable to Alfred the Great, by leading a large body of men upon the coast. He took possession of a portion of Sussex, and the castle and seaport were held by his family when William the Conqueror "landed in England, and they held the crown for many generations." The grandfather of our subject was born in England May 20, 1746, and came to America prior to, and was married in, 1769, to Hannah Billings, of Amherst, Mass. He was a soldier in the Revolution, and afterward located at Amherst. This is the origin of the Hastings family in America. His parents, Lucius and Olive Smith Hastings, located in the town of Amherst, Hampshire Co., Mass., and raised a family of six children four sons and two daughters. The daughters now live in Massachusetts - Sarah S., in South Deerfield, and Sybil W., in Hadley, Mass. Our subject was born in Amherst, Hampshire Co., Mass., Sept. 18, 1818, and came with his brother David to Wisconsin in November, 1842. His brothers Horace and Hamilton came in the following June. He located on a farm on Sec. 30, town of Oconomowoc, Waukesha County, where he made his home for two years; then removed to the town of Ixonia, Jefferson County, and engaged in cutting heavy timber for awhile. He was Assessor of the towns of Concord and Ixonia before their separation, and was one of the Board at the time of their divisions. He, with his brother Hamilton, who lived on an adjoining farm, built the Maple Grove House on the plank road from Milwaukee to Watertown in 1850, and two years later he bought his brother's interest and ran the house alone for awhile. Trading the hotel at Maple Grove for property in Watertown to Mr. John Gibbs, he returned to Massachusetts for the winter, but came again to Wisconsin in the following spring. He began merchandising at Rock River, Rock County, and Pipersville, Jefferson County, which he continued for six years. He then engaged in the manufacture of saleratus till 1863, when he sold out and engaged in agriculture in Rock County till 1867, when he returned to Oconomowoc, and has since lived a more retired life. He was married at Ashfield, Franklin County, Mass., June 26, 1839 to Miss Elizabeth, daughter of Lewis and Susannah (Hooper) Chamberlin, a native of Stockbridge, Mass., born Aug. 11, 1820. Their children are Ellen M., born at Ashfield, Mass., Dec. 1, 1841; married to Calvin W. Burns, of Watertown, Wis. Sept. 26, 1860; lives now at Lime Springs, Howard Co., Iowa; Olive L., born at Oconomowoc, Wis, June 26, 1844. married at Watertown, Wis, Jan l. 1861, to William E. Duerdin, and now lives at Ripon, Wis.; Lewis J.. born in Ixonia, Jefferson Co, Wis, May 29, 1846, married Miss Josie, daughter of David Smith, of Rock County, Wis, in August 1866, and now resides in York County, Neb.

Orville Hathaway

ORVILLE HATHAWAY was born in Homer, N Y., April 13. 1819, he lived there until September 1846, when he came to Milwaukee and engaged in millwrighting there until April, 1847, when he returned to Homer, there remained until the fall of 1847, and then went to Groveland, near Mt. Morris, N. Y., and built a mill for the society of Shakers, and continued there until 1849. In July of the same year, he came to Oconomowoc and engaged in millwrighting and carpenter and joiner's work, until 1863, then purchased an interest in a mill here, which he sold out in October 1879, and since then has retired from business. Mr. Hathaway was married in Homer, N Y., in 1844, to Maria A. Core; she was born in Homer; they have two children - Orville H., born in Homer, and Thomas Wilber, born in Oconomowoc; they have lost one daughter, Mercy P., died at the age of 11 years. Mr Hathaway has been Assessor, Justice of the Peace and President of the Council.

Rufus C. Hathaway

RUFUS C. HATHAWAY was born May 24, 1816, in Homer, Cortland Co, N. Y. came to Wisconsin in August, 1842, and located at Beloit, Rock Co.. where he remained one year, and then returned to his native town, where he remained until June 1, 1848; he commenced the study of law in Beloit, and afterward continued it in New York State. He was educated at Cortland Academy. He engaged in carriage-making in Milwaukee, having commenced to learn carriage-making when 17 years of age; he was one year in Milwaukee. May 25, 1849. he came to Oconomowoc, bought a farm in Ashippun, Dodge Co., but did not run it, being in ill health for the first five and a half years, having ague all the time; he taught music, and played for parties, etc. Mr. Hathaway educated himself as an engineer and surveyor; laid out the old stone mill, in 1857. In December, 1857, he returned to New York State, and engaged in settling up his father's estate, and returned, March, 1859, to Oconomowoc, has since been engaged in the practice of law; has been Town Clerk. Chairman Town Board of Supervisors, Assessor and Justice of the Peace, at present holding the latter office; he has been District Attorney and County Surveyor. Mr. Hathaway was married in Homer, N Y., Aug. 17, 1845, to Flavilla J. Hobart, she was born in Homer; they have four children - Emma J., born June 23, 1850; Lizzie M., born Dec. 15; 1851; Edward Clark, born March 8, 1856, and Arthur C, born June 14, 1869, they have lost three children -- Polk H., born June 7, 1846, died May 17, 1850; Helen. born Nov. 8, 1848, died Oct. 9, 1849, and Hobart M., born Feb. 13, 1859, died Oct. 7, 1865.

James C. Hitchcock

JAMES C. HITCHCOCK hardware merchant, is a native of the town of Augusta, Oneida Co., N. Y.; born in the year 1828; his father, Eben Hitchcock, was a native of Hartford Co., Conn., his mother, Nancy Baker, was born in the town of Augusta, Oneida Co., N. Y. At the age of 18 years, be began the tinner's trade, at Clinton, Oneida Co., which he continued there and at Utica, for nearly five years, and from 1851 to 1856, he carried on the trade at Albion, Orleans Co., N. Y., going thence to Davenport, Iowa, he stopped a short time and returned via the Mississippi River and St Louis, Mo., to Albion, N. Y., where he was married Aug. 27, 1856, to Miss Leonora E., daughter of Gilbert and Nancy Close, a native of that town. Soon after marriage, they removed to St. Louis, where he engaged as salesman in a wholesale house-furnishing hardware store, for John J. Lock & Co.; it being a branch of their New York house; coming to Oconomowoc in 1861, he opened a hardware store, and has since continued that trade. Mr. Hitchcock is the proprietor of the La Belle Spring, the oldest in the city, and known in an early day as the Cold Water Spring. Mr. and Mrs. H. are members of the Episcopal Church. He has been a member of the I. O. 0. F. for more than twenty-five years, and of the Masonic fraternity for twelve years, be is also a member of the Knights of Pythias.

D.O. Hibbard

D.O. HIBBARD, Principal of Oconomowoc public schools, was born at Brookfield, Madison Co., N. Y., Feb. 17, 1851; be received the earlier part of his education in the public schools and the DeRuyter Institute of Madison Co. He came to Wisconsin in 1868, and located at Milton, Rock Co., where he followed teaching during the winters, and attended school during the spring and fall terms, at Milton College, from which institution he graduated in 1875; in the fall, after his graduation, he was elected Principal of the Oconomowoc public schools, remaining one year, and in the fall of 1876 was elected Principal of the Lodi school of Columbia Co. Returning to Oconomowoc in 1877, has been re-elected to the position of Principal each year since that time. He was married July 18, 1876, to Miss Ida F., daughter of Addison and Clarissa Brightman, of Milton Junction, Rock Co., Wis.; they have one son, Carlisle V. They are members of the Seventh-day Advent Church. He is also a member of the T. of H. and Council of Select Templars.

Magnus Hildahl

MAGNUS HILDAHL, farmer, Sec. 35; P. O. Oconomowoc; was born in Norway, in 1835; he began the life of a sailor at the age of 15 years, and in 1851, with his parents, T. and Caroline Hildahl, came to Wisconsin, and located on a farm at Pine Lake, Waukesha Co. In the spring of 1852, he resumed his sailor life, at Milwaukee, on board the "Industry," then plying between Michigan City and Milwaukee; this he followed, during the summers, till 1864, when he enlisted in Co. D, 47th W. V. I., and was with his regiment in the Army of the Tennessee; was stationed at Nashville and Tullahoma, Tenn., and was mustered out at Madison, Wis., in September, 1865. Returning then to Wisconsin, be continued sailing, as mate on a Chicago vessel, till 1870, when he located on his present farm of 105 acres, on Sec. 35, town of Oconomowoc, which he had purchased in 1862. He was married in the spring of 1871 to Miss Maria, daughter of Ole Nelson, of this town, born in 1849; their children are Josephine C. and Orelia T. They are members of the Lutheran Church.

J.F. Hopkins

J. F. HOPKINS, M. D. , physician and surgeon; was born in Erie Co, N. Y., in 1827, he began the study of medicine in his native State, but graduated from the Chicago Medical College, in the winter of 1859-60; he at once entered upon the practice of his profession in Chicago, and in 1862 removed from there to Oconomowoc, where he has since practiced his profession. He was married in 1866 to Miss Elizabeth M. Woodcock, a native of Maine; their children are, Forest, Mary L., Elizabeth (deceased) and Glen A. The doctor and his family are connected with the Congregational Church.

Anthony Houser

ANTHONY HOUSER, merchant and Postmaster at Mapleton; was born in Baden in 1839. He emigrated to America in 1854, and located m Milwaukee and engaged in clerking until February 1855; from Milwaukee, he came to Mapleton. and continued clerking until 1857, after which he spent a year in the same business in 0conomowoc In 1858, he returned to Mapleton, and has been since engaged in merchandising. He was married in 1861, to Miss Kate Riggs, a native of Canada, who died in 1869, leaving five children. as follows John F., now a clerk in Milwaukee, Anna S, now a student in Milwaukee; Mary A., deceased; Ambrose E., a student at Watertown; Joseph, deceased. His second marriage was in 1876, to Kate Snyder, a native of Pennsylvania; they have two children - Herbert. A and Walter. The family is connected with the Catholic Church.

Charles M. Hubbard

CHARLES M. HUBBARD, cooper; was born at Bridgeport, Connecticut, in 1827; he began the cooper's trade with his father, Stephen Hubbard. when quite young. When 4 years old, his parents removed with him to Waterford, Saratoga Co., N. Y., where they spent seven years, then lived a year at Kingston, and afterward removed to Troy, for three years, and later still to Saratoga, where he lived till 1856, when he removed to Oconomowoc, Wis., built a cooper shop on the south side of La Belle lake, and began coopering here for Rockwell & Luck, then proprietors of the mill; he ran a force of twenty-five men and shipped his barrels to Milwaukee and other points for several years. He was a member of the Village Board one term, and was a member of the Street Committee during that time; he has been Street Commissioner one term. He was married in Saratoga, N. Y., in 1846, to Mary M., daughter of Harmon and Mahitable (Scofield) Craw, a native of Ulster Co., N. Y., born 1827; their children are; Stephen; Charles H., who served 100 days during the war, is now a printer of Milwaukee; Mary M., now the wife of E. J. Ferry, and lives at Postville, Iowa; Ida, now the wife of H. M. Jay, and lives at St. Paul; Hattie, now Mrs. Frank Boyce; of Cedar Rapids, Iowa. Mr. Hubbard was the first man initiated in the Elsworth Lodge of Oconomowoc. Mrs. Hubbard is a member of the M. E. Church.

Ferdnand Hubner

FERDNAND HUBNER. Street Commissioner; was born in Prussia in 1838, and emigrated with his parents to America in 1846; they located in the town of Ixonia, Jefferson Co., Wis., which was his home till 23 years of age. He enlisted in August, 1861, at Oconomowoc, in the 28th W. V. I., and was assigned at Milwaukee to Co. B, 26th W. V. I., with which he served in the Army of Virginia and Tennessee till the battle of Burnt Hickory, Ga., May 25, 1863, he came home in August, 1863. from Nashville, Tenn., on a furlough, and was transferred to the hospital at Milwaukee, where he was discharged in July, 1865, returning to his farm in Jefferson County in 1866; in the spring of 1869, he removed to Milwaukee, and in December following came to Oconomowoc; he engaged in the commission business for two years, and in 1871 he began teaming and sprinkling the streets, which he has since followed; he began the foundry and machine shop in 1879, under the firm of Hartmann, Hubner & Co.; he was elected Street Commissioner in 1873, re-elected in 1874 and 1880. He was married in November, 1865, to Miss Lesetta, daughter of F. and Dorothea (Raash) Hartmann, a native of Jefferson Co., Wis, born in the town of Ixonia in 1845; their children are Otto, Amanda, Eddie, Ernst, Minnie, John. They are members of St. Paul's Lutheran Church.

Orrin Hungerford

ORRIN HUNGERFORD was born in Jefferson Co., N. Y., in 1822, and spent his time at farming in his native county till 1854, whence he emigrated to Wisconsin and located at Kewaunee, Kewaunee Co.; a year later, they removed to the town of Holland, Sheboygan Co., and there followed farming for sixteen years, after which they went to the town of Farmington, Jefferson Co., and made that their home till 1877, whence they removed to this city; he now owns a farm of 60 acres in the town of Farmington. He was married in Jefferson Co., N. Y., June 1, 1853, to Miss Julia A., daughter of Salma D. and Belinda Blanchard, a native of that county; their children are, A. Elizabeth, now the wife of Benton Woodman, and lives in Farmington, Jefferson Co., Wis.; Benjamin F., at home; Mary Z., now Mrs. H. Lyman, and lives in Baraboo, Wis.; Abbie B., born May 11, 1867, and died Aug. 15, 1879. Mr. and Mrs. Hungerford are members of the M. E. Church.

Edwin Hurlbut

EDWIN HURLBUT, journalist and attorney; was born at Newtown, Conn.. Oct,. 10, 1817, at the age of 7, he moved with his parents to Bradford Co., Penn., from where, after attending school about seven years, he struck out for himself, going on foot to Newark, N. J.; after residing there one year, be emigrated to Michigan, but soon after returned East and began the study of law; at the age of 24 he had saved $1,400 and paid $1,200 for a home, and the balance for books, only to be bitterly disappointed by finding a mortgage on the house. He was now living at Lodi, N. Y., having married Catherine Chandler on Oct. 10, 1840 - his 23 birthday. After losing his home by the unknown mortgage, Mr. H. moved to Towanda, Penn., and commenced the study and practice of law, and after finishing his sixth year, in 1847, he was admitted to the bar; in the same year he returned to Michigan was admitted to practice at the bar, and received the appointment of Postmaster; was also appointed District Attorney, also received from Gov. Ransom his appointment of Judge Advocate in the State militia, with the rank of Colonel; in 1850, he came to Wisconsin and settled in Oconomowoc, where he has since resided, and was admitted in the Circuit Court also in the Supreme Court and United States Court. In the first year of his residence in this State, he was appointed the attorney of the Milwaukee, Waterloo & Madison Plank Road; and at another time, Chairman of the Democratic County Committee; in 1854, he was Chairman of the Senatorial and Assembly Committee, from which time he has figured conspicuously in the political affairs of the State. In Madison, at the People's Convention, where the Republican party of this State. was organized, he opposed the further extension of slavery; in 1856 he was elected District Attorney. and in 1858, he was appointed attorney for the M., B. D. & B. R. R., now C., M. & St. P. R. R., holding the position several years; in 1860 and 1864, he supported Lincoln for the Presidency, in 1861, he was appointed Colonel on Gov. Randall's staff; took an active part in getting recruits for the army, contributed largely in bounties to the families of those who enlisted and pledged his services gratuitously for procuring their pensions and bounties - a pledge which he has faithfully kept. He was sent to Washington with the 4th Wisconsin Regiment, receiving an appointment in the State Commissary Department, was appointed to the duty of inspecting troops and studying the qualifications of officers for promotion; in the same year, he was appointed aide to the Commander-in-Chief, with the rank of Colonel, by Gov. Randall; in 1862, he was appointed Deputy United States Marshal, with Provo-Marshal power, to issue passes and superintend military affairs in his district; was also tendered a position, by the Governor, of Colonel of one of the regiments. but declined, because the army was being officered by politicians, rather than soldiers; in 1868, he gained an election to the legislature by the Republicans; while there he introduced a bill for the repeal of the law which deprived deserters of the right of franchise; in 1869, was appointed one of the managers of the State Industrial School at, Waukesha; in 1870, was appointed by Gov. Fairchild. to represent him at the International Congress, on penitentiary and reformatory discipline; was elected one of the Vice Presidents; in 1872, was appointed a delegate to the International Penitentiary Congress in London, England; in the same year, he endorsed the nomination of Horace Greeley for the Presidency, and has been identified with the reform movement since then; in 1873, was elected District Attorney for Waukesha Co., on the Reform ticket. In May, 1874, he was a member of the National Prison Congress, held at St. Louis, and elected one of its Trustees, and appointed on the Committee on Criminal Law Reform, in 1875, was appointed a member of the Board of Managers of the State Industrial School for three years, the same year, he was elected a Trustee of the National Prison Association at New York, and also one of the Committee on Discharged Convicts; he has held the positions of Trustee and President of the village of Oconomowoc, and has zealously devoted himself to its prosperity. In religious belief he is a Baptist; is strictly temperate in his habits; is a member of Waukesha Chapter No. 37, A., F. & A. M. He has children - daughters now living. The death of his first wife occurred April 6, 1864, was married, December following, to Mrs. M. H. Farner, of Waukesha, Wis. Mr. Hurlbut is a man of positive character; is a self-made man; has worked his own way, through life; is self-reliant; as a lawyer, ranks among the best talent in the State, has an extensive practice in the several courts of this State, and in the United States Courts; he has attended every session of the Circuit Court for Waukesha Co. for the past twenty-five years. Mr. H. is owner and publisher of the Wisconsin Free Press.

Gilbren Jensen

GILBREN JENSEN, grain dealer; was born in Norway January 11, 1823, and emigrated to America in 1853; arriving in Oconomowoc August 14 of that year, he was employed on the railroad then being built through here, and on April 18, 1854, he was employed as miller in the Oconomowoc flouring-mill by Lieck & Rockwell, which position he held till September 8, 1862; he then rented the flouring-mill at Stone Bank, of which he was proprietor for nearly two years; returning then to Oconomowoc, he purchased the warehouse of C. M. Birdoe, and has since been dealing in grain. He was married in Norway in January, 1849, to Maria H. Knudstatter, who died in August, 1861 (the first burial in the new cemetery); she left one daughter, Maria, now the wife of William Henning and lives in this city. His second marriage was January 21, 1862, to Martha M. Nilsdatter, a native of Norway, and came to Oconomowoc in 1856; they have two daughters, Margaretta and Nellie M. Mr. Jensen's family are connected with the Lutheran Church.

H.G. Jones

H. G. JONES, tailor; was born in Ellifordshire, England, in 1819, but came to America when quite young; he began the tailor's trade in Wyoming Co., N. Y., in 1833, and three years later (fall of 1837) he came to Wisconsin, and spent the winter in Brownstown, Jackson Co., and in the spring of 1838 he went to West Virginia, and located in Wheeling for a short time. He then visited Lexington, Ky., and many other places in 1844; be settled again in Wheeling, and made that his home till 1850, when he came to Oconomowoc; locating on a farm, he devoted his attention to agriculture for one and a half years; then removed to the village, and resumed his trade, which he has since continued. Mr. Jones has been City Treasurer for nine years. He was married in 1844, to Miss E. S. Acton - a native of Virginia; her grandfather, Acton, was a soldier in the Revolutionary War; their children are Hannah, now the wife of H. Erredge, of this city; William E., who was killed at Memphis in 1864; James F., at home; Lizzie H.; Edith, now the wife of Frank Densmore, and lives at Granville, Mich.; Melvin A.; Mrs. Jones is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church; Mr. Zones is a member of the Masonic fraternity.

William M. Jones

WILLIAM M. JONES, proprietor of the Jones House; was born in Monmouthshire, England, in 1849; his father, Thomas Jones, was a native of Monmouthshire; his mother, Esther Morgan, was born in Devonshire. In 1854, they emigrated to America, and located at Skaneateles, Onondaga Co., N. Y., whence, a year later, they came to Waukesha, Wis; living in the city of Waukesha three years, they then removed to Genesee, where his father died about 1859 or 1860; in September, 1861, he with his mother, came to Oconomowoc, where he soon became employed by Mr. G. W. Fay, then proprietor of the La Belle House, and remained with him in that till it burned, then spent some time with him in a hotel at Sarnia, Canada West; spending five years with Mr. Fay, he next was employed by Mr. Bruce, in the La Belle House, after it was rebuilt, and in 1870 he was employed to work on the Townsend House in its building and after its completion; remained with the house for eight seasons, spending three winters during that time as conductor on the North Chicago City Railway Company. He spent the winter of 1872 at Riverside, Ill., in charge of W. T. Allen's summer residence, and during the autumns of 1876, ''77 and '78, he had charge of the "Caw-caw shooting club," at Marquette, Green Lake Co., Wis. In 1872, he built the Jones house, for a private residence, which was afterwards opened for a hotel, as given in the history of the house. He was married Nov. 13, 1872, to Miss Katie, daughter of Ralph Habernicht, a native of Washington Co., Wis.; they have one daughter, Edna M. Mr. Jones is a member of the Masonic fraternity.

Lyman Kellogg

LYMAN KELLOGG, son of Horace and Almira (Smith) Kellogg, of the old Puritan New England stock; was born in the town of Amherst, Hampshire Co., Mass., Dec. 1, 1814; he came to Wisconsin in 1845, and located on a farm two and a half miles from the village of Oconomowoc, Waukesha Co., where he built his pioneer shanty, and made his home till 1854. He next began dealing in grain; at this place followed that line of business for twelve years, when, in 1866, he began dealing in dry goods, and followed merchandising till 1879. At the completion of the C., M. & St. P. R. R., he was appointed express agent at Oconomowoc, and held that position till 1879, when he resigned. Mr. Kellogg was President of the Village Board two terms, and has been a member of the City Council for a number of terms. He was married in 1847 to Miss Emaline, daughter of Seth Leonard, a native of Mass., but came to the town of Ashippun, Dodge Co., Wis., about, 1846; it, being one of the first marriages here, was quite an interesting event; a "democrat horse and buggy" was procured, the best in the village, by the groom, which was to convey him to the home of the bride, and the two to their new home, but, after the ceremony, it was concluded to leave Mrs. Kellogg with her parents till the log house was completed; a few days more prepared the rustic cottage for its mistress, and the happy husband returned, not in the "democrat wagon," but with the ox cart for his bride; loading up with crockery, chickens, cats, etc., they wended their way to their new home; their children are Harriet, now the wife of N. H. Humiston of this city; Sarah; Charles, now married, business in this city; Frank, now in Plymouth Co., Iowa; Emma. Mrs. Kellogg died in Feb. 1865. His second marriage was in August 1871, to Mrs. Maria Wright, of Oconomowoc. Mr. Kellogg and his family are members of the Congregational Church. Mrs. Kellogg is a member of St. Jerome's Church.

George L. Kern

GEORGE L. KERN, grocer; was born in Madison Co. N. Y., in 1831, and came to Wisconsin in 1844 and located on a farm in the town of Ixonia, Jefferson Co., which was his home till 1853 or '54, when he removed to the town of Ashippun, Dodge Co., and engaged in farming there till 1874, when he came to Oconomowoc,. and in the fall of 1878 began the grocery trade, and January, 1879, put in a stock of drugs, and took Mr. Young in as a partner. Mr. Kern enlisted in Co. I, 48th W. V. I., in March, 1865, and served till 1866. He was married in 1867 to Miss Phebe A., daughter of Edward Goodell, of the town of Lebanon, Dodge Co., but a native of Fulton, Oswego Co. N. Y., and emigrated to Wisconsin in 1845. Mr. Kern was Assessor of Ashippun three years; also Assessor of this city for three years; he has also been a member of the City Council. He has been a member of the Masonic fraternity for twenty years.

Rev. Frank F. Kleuske

REV. FRANK F. KLEUSKE, Pastor of the German Methodist Episcopal Church; was born in Prussia in 1844, and, in the spring of 1852, his parents emigrated with him to America, and located in Milwaukee, where his mother died in June following; removing, in 1856, to Ahnapee, Kewaunee Co., Wis., where he followed farming till 1867, when he spent a year at the ship carpenter's trade at Sturgeon Bay; in 1868, he entered Wallace College, of Berea, Ohio, from which he graduated in 1872, after which he spent another year at the ship carpenter's trade at Cleveland; returning to Wisconsin in 1873, he entered the work of the ministry at Forest, Fond du Lac Co., under the Presiding Elder of the Fond du Lac District; he joined the Conference at Chicago, in 1873, and Sept. 27, 1874, was ordained Deacon at that city by Bishop Simpson, and assigned to the charge at Clayton, Winnebago Co., Wis., where he remained three years; at the Conference of La Porte, Ind., Sept. 23, 1876, he was ordained Elder by Bishop Merrill, and sent to the church at Brillion, Calumet Co., whence, after a two years' pastorate, he came to Oconomowoc, where he has since been in charge of the German Methodist Episcopal Church. He was married Aug. 4, 1871, to Mrs. Amanda, widow of William Schmidt, and daughter of Charles and Mary A. Wuestenburg, a native of Pittsburgh, Penn. Mrs. Kleuske has two daughters, Mary A. and Ida P. Schmidt.

Thourald Kier

THOURALD KIER, tinner; was born in Norway, in 1833; he began his trade when 13 years old, and, after working at it six years, he then spent three years traveling through Denmark, Germany and other parts of Europe, after which he returned to Norway and carried on the tinner's trade four or five years; he came to America in 1866, locating in Milwaukee, Wis.; he continued his trade there for two years, and in 1868 he came to Oconomowoc, where he has since followed the same vocation. He was married in 1870, to Miss C. Gerhardene Christianson, a native of Norway; their children are Mary, deceased; Martin, Annie, Gerhard. They are members of the Lutheran Church.

George Kinne

GEORGE KINNE was born Aug. 1, 1824, Vienna, Oneida Co., N.Y.; at the age of 14 years, he began the boot and shoemaker's trade in his native place, which he followed there two and a half years; then clerked in a grocery store at Fish Creek Landing for five years; resuming his trade in 1847 at Vienna, he followed it there for six years. He was married at Vienna, August 3, 1848, to Miss Caroline, daughter of Orra and Delany (Bently) Wetherbee, a native of Glens Falls, Warren Co., N.Y. In August, 1853, they started for Wisconsin, and arrived in Oconomowoc in September following. Here he continued his trade till October, 1861, when he formed a copartnership with John Metcalf, and dealt in boots and shoes till 1863, when he sold out to Mr. Metcalf, and in 1866 began the business of a dealer again with Mr. Wetherbee, and continued the business till 1870; since which time he has been engaged in various kinds of business. Mrs. Kinne brought the first dress model to Oconomowoc, and was the only dressmaker here for three years; she has devoted much of her time to that business since. Their children are as follows, Cleera A., born Aug. 2, 1849, at Vienna, N.Y., died Aug. 11, 1850; Cynthia M., born Aug. 4, 1851, died there June 3, 1853; Frank W. born Jan. 25, 1855, now lives at LaCrosse, Wis.; George H., born June 20, 1858, died June 21, 1858; Charles, born June 28, 1864, now at home. Mr. and Mrs. Kinne are members of the M.E. Church.

Nels Larson

NELS LARSON, farmer, Sec. 1; P. O. Mapleton; is a native of Norway, where he was born in 1825, and spent his time with his father at farming till 1849; he then emigrated to America and stopped a short time at Palmyra, Wis.; then came to the town of Oconomowoc, Waukesha Co., where he bought 40 acres of timber land on Sec. 1; he improved gradually as his limited means would allow, and afterward bought 20 acres more joining it; he built his house in 1858, and kept bachelor's hall till 1859, when he was married to Miss Ellen M. Anderson, a native of Norway, born in December, 1835, and came to Wisconsin in 1858; their children are Lewis A., Edward, deceased, Charles M., Adolph S., Christian, Anton G., Edward, Emma K., N. Matilda. Mr. Larson's family is connected with the Lutheran Church.

Christian Linger

CHRISTIAN LINGER, dentist; was born in the Rhine Province, in 1838, and in 1844, came with his parents to Milwaukee, Wis.; his father being sickly and poor, the support of the family depended upon the children, which required all their efforts. When 16 or 17 years old, he began working and studying in the office of Dr. Jennings, a dentist of Milwaukee, and continued with him for three winters, working at farming during summers; he next worked at the carpenter and joiner's trade for a short time, then was engaged in the mercantile trade for some time. November 5, 1871, he was married at Fussville, Waukesha Co., to Miss Eve Michaels, a native of Washington Co., Wis., born Sept. 9, 1847. They removed to Jefferson, Jefferson Co., Wis.; engaged in farming for a year, then settled in the village of Jefferson, and kept a confectionery store for about a year after which he traveled for a year or two, selling medicines; he then resumed the study of dentistry with Dr. Townsend, at Jefferson, and remained with him two and a half years, then pursued his studies and practice with Dr. Crandall, at Fort Atkinson, for six months; returning then to Jefferson. he disposed of his effects and came to Oconomowoc, where he has since practiced his profession since Aug., 1870. Their children are as follows - George, born Sept. 19, 1863, died Sept. 19, 1863; George, Jr., born Nov. 18, 1864, died Feb. 20, 1870; Mathias, born Nov. 8, 1867, died March 13, 1870; Lizzie, born Oct. 9, 1869; Joseph, born Nov. 10, 1871; Henry, born Oct. 20, 1878; Anna C., born Feb. 5, 1875, died March 5, 1878; Christiana G., born June 13, 1876, died Sept. 3, 1877; Michael J., born Aug. 22, 1878, died Sept. 8, 1878; Magee M., born Feb. 1, 1880. Members of the Catholic Church.

John Lorenz

JOHN LORENZ, carpenter and joiner was born in the city of Bostock, Mecklenburg, Schwerin, in 1829; he began the cabinet maker's trade when 15 years old, and followed it in his native city until 1854, when he came to America and located at Oconomowoc, Wis., in December of that year, after spending six weeks in Milwaukee; he continued the cabinet-maker's trade here for about ten years, then took up the carpenter's and joiner's trade, which he has followed since. He was married, in 1856, to Miss Sophia Grazer, a native of Hovensal, Prussia, and came to America in 1855 their; children are Louisa, Emma, Bertha, Anna, John, Sophia, Rosa. Mrs. L. is a member of the Catholic Church.

Hugo Lorleberg

HUGO LORLEBERG, hardware merchant and dealer in agricultural implements; was born in Halverstadt, Prussia, ?? 1848, and in 1851 his mother, Louisa Lorleberg, emigrated with him to America, and located in the town of Pewaukee, his father having come in 1850; they removed to Waukesha not long after their location in Pewaukee, where his father died in 1852; his mother afterward married Mr. Mauver, and now lives in this city (Oconomowoc); Mr. Lorleberg began the tinner's trade at Waukesha in 1862, and after working at it two years he enlisted in 1864 in Co. B, 39th W. V. I.; was sent with his regiment to Memphis, Tenn, where they were on picket duty most of the time for six months; was mustered out at Milwaukee in the autumn of 1864; returning then to his home, he spent six months on the farm, after which he worked at his trade in Milwaukee for two years; he then returned to Waukesha for two years; forming a copartnership with John Hartwell, of Waukesha, they began the hardware business at Mukwonago, and a year later he paid his partner $800 for the $100 interest when first invested; he continued the business alone there till the fall of 1870, when he removed his business to Oconomowoc, and began in a small one-story building which he afterwards enlarged and used till April, 1879, when it burned; he built, in the spring of 1880, a large two-story brick, which he now occupies and carries on an extensive trade. Mr. L. is a member of the I. O. O. F.

James Luck

JAMES LUCK, retired, was born in the County of Suffolk, England, in 1818. At the age of 14 years he was apprenticed to the miller's trade in England, and served an apprenticeship of seven years. He came to America in 1839, and located in the town of Constableville, Lewis Co., N. Y., where he engaged at milling till 1842; going thence to Oneida Co. he worked at his trade in the towns of Lee and Taberg till 1847. Coming then to Oconomowoc, he engaged in farming a year; in 1855, he, in company with others, began the flouring mill now in this city, and, completing it in 1857, began operations, and he was connected with its management till 1879, when they disposed of it. Mr. Luck was marred in 1844 to Miss Mary C., a daughter of Abram W. and Abigail Nye, a native of the town of Sandwich, Barnstable Co. Mass., and removed to the town of Lee, Oneida Co. N. Y., a few years before their marriage; they have had two daughters-Elizabeth A., deceased; Ellen M. Mr. Luck and family are members of the Episcopal Church.

George A. Ludington

GEORGE A. LUDINGTON, proprietor of carriage and wagon shop; was born in Broome Co., N. Y., in 1834, and came with his parents, Henry and Mary Ludington, to St. Joseph Co., Mich., when 2 or 3 years old, and thence, in 1848, with them to Racine Co., Wis. Locating at Waterford, he soon entered upon his apprenticeship at the blacksmith trade with his father; he removed to Racine in 1857, and continued his trade there till 1860, when he came to Oconomowoc, and has since carried on the business of a blacksmith, and carriage and wagon manufacturer. Mr. Ludington was appointed under-Sheriff of Waukesha Co., by C. M. Hartwell, during his term of office; he was elected member of the City Council in 1877. He was married in 1855 to Miss Wealthy, daughter of James Berry, of Racine, Wis. Though a native of Michigan, his parents were of England. Their children are Edgar, Elmer and Ellsworth (twins), Franklin, William, Gertrude and Charles. Mr. L. has been a member of the Masonic fraternity for twenty-two years.

Henry Ludington

HENRY LUDINGTON, son of James Ludington, was born in Otsego Co., N. Y., in 1809, and began the blacksmith trade in his native county in 1828, which he afterward followed there, and at Troy, N. Y., till 1834; he then removed to London, Upper Canada, where he continued his trade till 1838; removing thence to St. Joseph Co., Mich., he there worked at his trade till 1846, when he came to Racine Co., Wis.; locating at Waterford, he carried on the carriage and wagon manufacture and blacksmithing till 1855, and then removed to Racine, where he continued till 1858; coming then to Oconomowoc, he opened a shop here, and carried on the business for three years; then sold out to his son, who now carries on the business. He enlisted in the fall of 1863, in Co. A, 42d W. V. I., under Col. Sprague; was on detached service at Cairo, Ill., most of the time; was mustered out in 1865, and returned to Waupaca Co., whither he had moved a short time before enlisting. He came again to Oconomowoc in the autumn of 1867, and in the spring of 1869 was elected City Marshal, and was re-elected each year till 1877, since which time he has been running an express wagon. He was married in Broome Co., N. Y., in 1831, to Mary A., daughter of David Dresser, a native of Vermont; their children are George A., now in this city; Esther, now the wife of Sherman E.; Anthony, who lives at Stillwater, Saratoga Co., N. Y.; Charlotte, now the wife of J. G. Beamus, who lives in Waupaca Co., Wis.; F. D. and Helen are at home. Mr. L. is a member of the Masonic fraternity.

Hiram F. Lyke

HIRAM F. LYKE, dealer in furniture and undertaker; is a son of David and Elizabeth Lyke, nee Snyder, natives of Columbia Co., N. Y. Mr. Lyke was born in Columbia Co., N. Y. in 1831, and came with his parents to Waukesha Co. Wis. In 1845. They located in the town of Vernon, where his father followed the carpenter trade for a few years; then removed his family, to the town of Mukwonago, where Hiram F. spent most of his time on the farm till 1852. Going in the spring of that year to California, he engaged in mining for eight years, and in the winter of 1859 and '60, returned via the Isthmus and Mexico, to his home in Mukwonago. In the following spring, he went to Texas and spent the summer traveling through Kansas and the Southwest, and returned in the winter of 1861-62. He enlisted as a private in 1862 in Co. F. 28th W. V. I. and was promoted to the position of 1st Lieutenant, and a portion of the time filled the office of Captain; he served with his regiment in all its principal movements till June, 1865, when, on account of ill health, he resigned at Little Rock, Ark. After an illness of six weeks there, he returned to his home. He spent the winter of 1865 and '66 at Detroit and in New York. He was married December, 25 1866, to the daughter of John O. Leroy, of the town of Brookfield, Waukesha Co. Wis., and immediately located at Oconomowoc, where, in the fall of 1867, he began dealing in furniture; his wife died July 11, 1870, leaving one son, Frank L. His second marriage was April 8, 1871, to Miss Lottie, daughter of Moses Mead, a native of Putnam Co., N. Y., but an emigrant to Oconomowoc, Wis., in 1869; their children are Arthur D., John D., and Alice M. Mr. L. was a member of the City Council for two years. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity.

Rev. Father Hugh McMahon

REV. FATHER HUGH McMAHON, Priest of St. Jerome's Catholic Church; was born in County Tyrone, Ireland, Nov. 2, 1824; his parents, Hugh and Bridget (Connelley) McMahon, were both natives of that county, and died there when he was 17 years of age; he began the study of Latin and Greek in 1836, in the school of his native parish, and in 1839 he entered St. Patrick's College, Armagh, where he pursued his studies till the vacation of 1842, and in September of that year he entered All Hallows, Dublin, and continued there till the spring of 1844; coming then to America, he entered St. Charles Borromeo's Theological Seminary of Philadelphia, where he completed his studies and was ordained priest in 1848; his first mission was that of Christ's Church, Chambersburg, Franklin Co., Penn.; his second was St. Mary's, Beaver Meadows, Coburn Co., Penn, for two years; in 1851, he went to Philadelphia, built St. Bridget's, Philadelphia, and was its Pastor till July, 1855; he then came to Milwaukee; and in September following was appointed to build St. Mary's, Fitchburg, Dane Co., Wis., of which he was afterward Pastor for two years; in 1857, he went to Chilton, Calumet Co., built St. Augustine's and was built Pastor there till 1865, when he went as priest to St. Mary's Cascade, where he remained till 1868, then St. Francis Borgia's Cedarburg, and from there in September, 1876, he came to St. Jerome's, Oconomowoc.

Gustav Machus

GUSTAV MACHUS, of the firm of Hartmann, Hubner & Co., proprietors of foundry and machine shop; was born in Prussia in 1852, and came to America, with his parents, in 1866, and located on a farm at Oconomowoc for one year, then removed to Horicon, Dodge Co., where he followed farming one year; returning then to Oconomowoc, he began work in the machine shop, for J. Rowell & Sons, and has continued the machinist trade, here and at various other places, since that time. He became a member of the present firm at the establishment of the shops and foundry in May, 1879. He was married Nov. 26, 1879, to Miss Mary Bartels, of the town of Ixonia, Dodge Co., Wis. They are members of the Lutheran Church.

Alexander Madole

ALEXANDER MADOLE, farmer, Sec. 14; P. O. Oconomowoc; is a native of Down County, Ireland, born Aug. 16, 1826, and emigrated to America in the fall of 1840; he came as far west at that time as Richland Co., Ohio, where he was employed by a Mr. I. Clark; traveled with Mr. Clark as a rider of race-horses, and in that business traveled with Mr. Clark over many of the States. In February, 1844, he landed in the town of Summit, Waukesha Co., Wis., and in May following, began work for Mr. George Ferry in the town of Oconomowoc at $8 per month. He soon after made a claim to forty acres of canal land on Sec. 17, town of Oconomowoc, which he partially improved, built a log house thereon, and, with a Mr. Whitney, made that his home for nearly a year; he was employed as miller for Cotton & Rockwell, from the fall of 1844, till the autumn of 1847, and during a part of 1848-49, he was employed by them to haul flour from Oconomowoc to Milwaukee, after which he was in the employ of Mr. Rockwell only, till 1850, and then worked during the summer in a brickyard, at the village; he crossed the Plains in 1852 to California, and there engaged in mining till 1858, whence he returned to Oconomowoc, and bought eighty acres on Sec. 14, where he has since lived and followed farming; he now owns 100 acres on that section. He was married in March, 1868, to Mrs. Catherine, widow of Samuel Walker, who was a soldier in the 6th Ohio, and was killed at Nashville, Tenn., in 1865, leaving her with one daughter, Hattie, born July 4, 1861. Mr. and Mrs. Madole have five children-Susan, born March 16, 1869; Heather, born Dec. 9, 1871; Alexander, born Jan. 2, 1873; William, born April 11, 1875; Nellie, born Sept. 15, 1879. Mrs. M. is a member of St. Catharine's Catholic Church.

D. McL. Miller, M.D.

D. McL. MILLER, M. D., physician and surgeon; was born in New York City in 1836. His earlier and literary education was in the public schools of his native city; he entered the College of Physicians and Surgeons in 1852, and graduated from that institution 1856. Removing to Wisconsin in 1858, he located at Oconomowoc, where he practiced his profession till 1862. He then joined the 28th W. V. I., as Assistant Surgeon, but was soon put on detached services and placed in charge of the hospital at Little Rock, Helena, where he remained most of the time during his term of service; Rejoining his regiment soon after the surrender of Gen. Lee, he was mustered out of service at Madison, Wis., in October 1865, when he returned to Oconomowoc, resumed and has since successfully practiced his profession. He was married in April 1859 to Mary G., daughter of the Rev. Dr. Remington, D. D., a Baptist minister of New York City. Their children are, Nathaniel W., Jennie born October 1861, now the wife of Fred Parsons of this city; Charles born Jan. 1, 1868; Thomas born Nov. 26, 1870. The doctor and family attend the Episcopal Church.

Rev. Father Michael Monaghan

REV. FATHER MICHAEL MONAGHAN, Pastor of St. Catharine's Catholic Church, Mapleton; was born in Pomeroy, County Tyrone, Ireland, in 1810; is the son of Henry and Ann Quinn Monaghan; his father died when he was about 7 years old; was then take to live with his grandfather. At the age of 15 years, he began teaching English and arithmetic in the Chapel of Dunnamore, and took up the study of Latin during that time, unknown to his relatives; when the knowledge of these facts reached them, strong objections were at once raised to his studying for the ministry; but after much parleying an uncle gave him four lambs, which would aid him in his desired project; he next attended a private school, and in 1819 entered the Seminary of Bodony, under the Very Rev. Francis McHugh; here he studied the classics, and with three others passed his examination for Maynooth College, before the Most Rev. Dr. Kelly, then Primate of all Ireland. Returning home for want of means to continue his studies, he sailed, in 1835, for America, and was sent by the Very Rev. John Powers of New York, to Chambly, Lower Canada, where he pursued the study of theology till 1837. At the breaking out of the rebellion in Canada, he changed to St. Mary's Baltimore, Md., and there continued his studies nearly a year. He returned to his uncle's in Ireland in 1838, and was ordained at Drogheda by Primate Crolly, then Primate of all Ireland, and in a fortnight after was sent as Assistant Priest to his native parish. At the Easter Conference of 1839, he was assigned to Moy, County Tyrone, for six months, and in November following was sent as regular curate to Ports Down, where he remained till 1843, when he came again to America. He was assigned, by Archbishop Henni, of Milwaukee, to the Archbishop of New York, having studied for that bishopric. He was then sent to the Canada missions, where he continued his work till 1852, when he returned to New York, and was Pastor at Verplaneks, Colloback and Peekskill. In 1864, he returned to Europe on a visit; in January, 1865, he came again to Wisconsin, and was then sent by Bishop Henni to Montello, where he was given charge of the missions of the State, especially of Marquette, Adams, Green Lake and part of Columbia and Waushara Counties, holding that position till 1871. He was assigned to the parish at Mazomanie, and remained there till 1874, when he came as Pastor of St. Catharine's, of Mapleton.

Cyrenus Morrison

CYRENUS MORRISON, farmer, Sec. 8; P. O. Monterey; was born in Warren Co., N. Y., in 1822, and is son of James and Minerva Morrison; at the age of 21 years, he began the cooper's trade, which he followed at Oswego, Oswego Co., N. Y., till 1853; he then emigrated to Waukesha Co., Wis., and located on his present farm, 40 acres on Sec. 8, town of Oconomowoc, where he followed the cooper's trade for two years, and since followed farming. He was married in 1844, to Eva, daughter of Thomas and Laney Fulmer, a native of Cayuga Co., N. Y., born in 1823, and died at her home in the town of Oconomowoc in January, 1878, leaving five children-Nancy A.; William H., now in Iowa; Sarah A., now the wife of R. S. Owen and lives in Adair Co., Iowa; George W., in Adair Co., Iowa; Benjamin D., in Michigan. Mr. Morrison and family are connected with the M. E. Church.

Richard Nash

RICHARD NASH, of the firm of Nash & Coyle, manufacturers and dealers in boots and shoes was born in County Tipperary, Ireland, in 1844. He came to Saratoga, N. Y., when 2 years old; in to Waukesha County, Wis., in 1857, and located at Pewaukee. Two years later, he became apprenticed to the shoemaker's trade, at Hartland, where and at other places he continued his trade till 1867; coming then to Oconomowoc, he worked six years for Small & McKee; then in 1873, with Mr. Bender, formed a firm under the name of Bender & Nash, which existed till 1878, when Mr. Bender sold out to A. Ostrich, who after three months, sold to H. N. Humiston, in Jul 1879; Mr. Nash and Mr. Humiston divided their stock, and in August following Mr. Coyle became a partner with Mr. Nash, as the firm of Nash & Coyle; they now carry out the business. Mr. Nash was married, in 1878, to Miss Phebe Lain, of Pewaukee; their children are Arthur R.; Carrie, deceased; Francis R., Cora Belle. They are members of St. Jerome's Catholic Church.

George W. Olson

GEORGE W. OLSON, of the firm of Olson & Simons, house and sign painters; was born at Oconomowoc, Wis., in 1850; his parents, Nels and Mary Olson, emigrated from Norway to Wisconsin, and located at this place in 1848. His father followed the shoemaker's trade here till 1861, when he enlisted in Co. C, 15th W. V. I., and was with his regiment till it reached Louisville, Ky., where he died in the hospital in 1862. George W. began the painter's trade with Barry & Nelly, at this place, in 1862, and continued work here as a journeyman till 1873, when he went to Milwaukee, and clerked a year for H. Bosworth & Sons; in 1874, he returned to Oconomowoc, and formed a copartnership with J. L. Hastings, at the painter's trade, and continued with him till 1877, when Mr. A. Simons became a member of the firm instead of Mr. Hastings. He was married Nov. 17, 1875, to Miss Ida Forbes, a native of Canada, and an adopted daughter of Pearson Gibson, of Pine Lake, Wis.; they have one son, Albert N. Mrs. Olson is a member of the Episcopal Church.

Ole Olson

OLE OLSON, farmer, Sec. 14; P. O. Oconomowoc; was born in Norway in 1821, and began the tailor's trade in his native country, at the age of 16 years. He served a three years' apprenticeship, after which he continued the trade there as a journeyman for two years. He came to Wisconsin in 1843, and located in the town of Merton, Waukesha Co., where he followed farm laboring for two years in 1848, he entered a farm of sixty acres, on Sec. 14, town of Oconomowoc, and has since made it his home and now owns 150 acres on the same section. He was married Aug. 27, 1848, to Miss Ingeberg Johnson, a native of Norway, who came to Wisconsin in 1844; their children are Ole, now at home; Carrie, in Colorado; Cornelia, in Chicago, and Lizzie, at home. Mr. Olson's family is connected with the Lutheran Church.

Ole Olson

OLE OLSON, farmer, Sec. 1; P. O. Mapleton; is a native of Norway, born in 1826; his father dying when he was 5 and his mother when he was 6 years old. The homestead was then leased to, parties who were to care for him and an older sister till they reached their 15th year. At the age of 13, he began as a herder-boy, and followed that for four years, after which he worked at farm labor till 1845, when he went to live with a priest for eighteen months, and where he found employ in the city till May 1, 1847. He then sailed for America, and landed in Boston in June; August following, he reached Oconomowoc, Wis. He found a week's work at haying in the town of Ashippun, Dodge Co.; then went to the town of Merton, Waukesha Co. where he worked for Mr. Finch and various others till 1852; he then settled in the town of Aaron, Washington Co., and made that his home for five years, after which he bought his present farm of eighty acres on Sec. 1, town of Oconomowoc. He was married June 12, 1852 to Ingebor Nelson, a native of Norway, born 1817 and came to Wisconsin in 1851; she died April, 1857, leaving three children; Annie K., who died in June, 1857; Ole, now at Fargo, Minn.; Nellie L., now the wife of David Davidson, of Milwaukee. His second marriage was in 1859, to Sarah A. Halverson, a native of Norway, and came to Wisconsin in 1849; their children are Isabella A., now in Evanston, Ill. Nicholas H.; Paulina F.; Nelson I. and Betsy A. Two of his sons are members of the Lutheran Church, the rest attend the Methodist.

E.D. Parsons

E. D. PARSONS, dry goods merchant was born at Bangor, Me., in 1826; his father, Budd Parsons, was born at Belchertown Mass., in 1784; he was a sailor, and followed the seas for twenty-five or twenty-six years and afterward settled at Bangor; they started from Bangor in the fall of 1840, in a sail vessel, via the Hudson River, Buffalo and lakes, to Chicago, where they took teams for Galena, Ill., and reached their destination in six weeks after their departure from Maine; they engaged in farming there till 1847, when they came to Oconomowoc, and engaged in merchandising, which he has since followed; his mother (Mary Hinkley) died here in 1852; his father in 1862. Mr. Parsons is a member of the City Council. He was married Dec. 25, 1856, to Miss Julia A., daughter of Harvey Bond, of Milwaukee, though a native of the State of New York; their children are Fred, now a clothing merchant of this city; Edgar William H. Mrs. Parsons is a member of the Episcopal Church, Mr. Parsons of the I. O. O. F.

Henry M. Peters

HENRY M. PETERS, merchant tailor, was born at Demmin, Prussia in 1820; when 15 years old, he began the tailor's trade, which he followed there till September, 1839, after which he continued it at Hildesheim, Hanover, Hamberg, Berlin and other places till March, 1851; he then sailed for America, and landed in New York April 19 following, and remained in the city till September, 1852, when he went to Savannah, Ga., for three months; returning then to New York City, he continued his trade fifteen months, after which he went to Hartford, Conn.; for a year; he came to Wisconsin in 1855, and located at Mapleton, Waukesha Co., where he followed his trade till September, 1857, when he removed to Oconomowoc, and has since carried on the merchant tailoring business. He was married Nov. 13, 1864, to Miss Augusta Rabe, a native of Sassenhagen, Prussia, born Sept. 12, 1845, and came with her parents to Milwaukee, Wis., in June, 1856; their children are Mena, Henrietta, Augusta, Amanda, Henry, Frank, Otto and Edward. They are members of the Lutheran Church.

Halver Peterson

HALVER PETERSON, farmer, Sec. 6; P. O. Monterey; was born in Norway 1825. When about 15 years old, he began as a sailor, and continued on the Baltic Sea and Atlantic until 1854, immigrating at that time to America; he located on a farm, in the town of Ashippun, in Dodge Co., Wis., where he followed farming until 1866; selling his farm at that time, he crossed the road and settled on Sec. 6, town of Oconomowoc, where he now owns 133 acres. He was married in Norway, in 1850, to Anna Larson; their children are Maria, now Mrs. Olian Hansen, of the city of Oconomowoc; Peter, John, Andrew and Christian. All live at home and are members of the Lutheran Church.

Hiram Prosus

HIRAM PROSUS, farmer, Sec. 7; P. O. Monterey; a native of Columbia Co., N. Y., born in 1815; his parents, John and Ella (Carman) Prosus, were natives of New York, and both died when he was about 6 years old; he was then taken to live with his grandparents, and in 1830 with he moved to Wayne Co., N. Y., where he spent his time at farming until 1844. He emigrated to Wisconsin the same year, and located on Sec. 27, town of Oconomowoc, Waukesha Co., where he bought a claim of 160 acres, and made that his home till 1853; disposing of that farm at that time, he bought his present one of160 acres on Secs. 6 and 7, where he his since resided. He was married in 1844, to Catharine, a daughter of Samuel and Ann (Longstreet) Harney, a native of Monmouth Co., N. J.; she removed to New York, with her parents, when young, where she was married; their children are Ella, now the wife of Wesley Rhoda, at Gloversville, N. Y.; Anna also lives at Gloversville with her sister, Abbie at home; Martha, now Mrs. George Wilsey, of Oconomowoc; Mary at home. Mr. Prosus' family is connected with the M. E. Church. Mr. Prosus has been a member of the Town Board for several terms, also Assessor for several terms.

Edward A. Radcliffe

EDWARD A. RADCLIFFE, teacher; was born in Oconomowoc Oct. 10, 1848, and now the oldest native resident of the city. His father, William Radcliffe, was born on the Isle of Man, and his mother, Betsey Tremain, was a native of New York. They emigrated to Wisconsin in 1846, and located in the village of Oconomowoc, where his father followed the blacksmith trade for a few years, then removed to his present farm on Sec. 17, where he now follows farming. Edward A., subject of this sketch, received his early education in the district schools, and in 1869 he entered Ripon College, where he pursued his studies for two terms, changing then in 1870 to the Whitewater State Normal where he afterward completed his studies. He taught his first school at Ixonia Center, Jefferson Co., in the winter of 1869 and 1870; and in 1872 taught a term in Hamilton Co., Iowa. Returning to Wisconsin in 1873, he has spent much of the time in this county. He taught the first grammar department of the Oconomowoc public school in 1877, an din 1878 and 1879 at Summit Center, and in 1879 and 1880 at the Brown Street School, spending his summers on the farm. He was correspondent for the Milwaukee Sentinel in 1878 and 1879. He was married Nov. 3, 1875, to Miss Mary, daughter of H. C. and Laura Carpenter, a native of Steuben Co., N. Y., and came with her parents to Wisconsin 1866; their children are Laura and Freddie.

J.N. Regan, M.D.

J. N. REGAN, M. D., physician and surgeon; was born in County Cork, Ireland, in February 1847; he came with his parents to America in 1852, and located in the town of East Troy, Walworth Co., Wis. Five years later, he removed to Madison, Wis., where he was a student at the State University during the term of 1861 and part of 1863. He next began clerking in a drug store in that city, and later in that year, he enlisted in the 40th W. V. I., 100-day service; he was detailed Steward of the regimental hospital, and served as such till the expiration of his term of enlistment. Returning then to Madison, he began the study of medicine in 1864 with Dr. Carpenter, and attended lectures at Miami Medical College of Cincinnati, in 1865 and 1866, and in 1868 he went from there to Lon Island Hospital, from which institution he graduated in June 1868, passing his examination under the following Professors, Frank H. Hamilton, of Surgery; Austin Flint, M. D., Clinics and Medicines; Austin Flint, Jr., Physiology and Microscopic Anatomy; C. L. Ford, Anatomy; Samuel G. Armor, on Materia Medica, Therapeutics; Practice of Medicine and Pathology; Luther Swift, Obsterics and diseases of Women and Children; D. G. Eaton, on Chemistry and Toxicology; William Gill Fillon, Surgical Anatomy; Dewitt C. Enos, Operative Surgery. He began the practice of medicine at Madison, Wis., in 1868, but, after a short time, went into the drug business there, which he continued till 1874, when he removed to Oconomowoc, and has since practiced his profession. The doctor has been a member of the State Medical Society since 1876. He was married Sept. 21, 1869, to Miss Marcia N., daughter of Daniel Himeback, of East Troy, Walworth Co., Wis.; their children are Annie M. and Eugene D. The doctor and his family are members of the Catholic Church.

Thomas Salter

THOMAS SALTER, farmer, Sec. 34; P. O. Oconomowoc. This pioneer of Oconomowoc was born at Ashburton, Devonshire, England, November 30, 1808. He spent the first twenty years of his life with his parents, William and Jennie (Davey) Salter, at Ashburton; then removed to Devonshire, where he spent six years as a quarryman. Sailing thence to America in April, 1836, he landed at Quebec about the 1st of June. He came then to Buffalo, N. Y., and, after a few day's stay there, went to Toledo, Ohio, where he found employ for six weeks; then with an English friend came via Adrian, Mich., to Milwaukee, Wis., and spent a month in looking at this country; then returned to Toledo for the winter. IN June, 1837, he came again to Wisconsin and located on the northwest quarter of Sec. 34, being the second settler in the town of Oconomowoc, Waukesha Co.; he made his claim, built his pioneer shanty, then a log house, which sufficed till 1846, when he built the first frame house in the town, where his present house now stands. He was married at Milwaukee, June 20, 1838, to Miss Mary, daughter of Samuel Nack, a native of Torquay, Devonshire, England; she having come from England and landed in Milwaukee a day or two before their marriage; their children are Eliza, born May 25, 1840; the first child born in the town; William H., born Nov. 4, 1841; Susan S., born Aug. 26, 1843; Mary M., born in the first frame house in the town Jan. 9, 1847. Mr. Salter and family are members of the Episcopal Church.

August F. Schimmelpfinnig

AUGUST F. SCHIMMELPFINNIG, farmer, Secs. 19 and 20; P. O. Oconomowoc; was born in Prussia in 1843; he came to America with his parents, John and Louisa A. Schimmelpfennig, in the spring of 1855, and located in the town of Ixonia, Jefferson Co., Wis., where his mother died in the following fall; he made his home with his father, in Ixonia, till the spring of 1863, when he went to Rockford, Ill.; worked at farming till 1864, and then enlisted in Co. M, 8th Ill. C., and served eleven months with his regiment in the Army of the Potomac; he was mustered out at Washington, D. C., in 1865, when he returned to Rockford, and continued work a few months; then went to Ogle and Mason Counties, where he continued till the spring of 1867, when he returned to Jefferson Co., Wis., where he spent the summer. He was married in the fall of 1867 to Johannah Huebner, a native of Prussia; They have now five children-Annie, Edward (deceased), William, Huldah, Lydia and Ida. He located on Sec. 17, town of Oconomowoc, Waukesha Co., soon after marriage, and made that his home till 1875, when he removed to a farm on Secs. 19 and 20, where they now live.

Henry Schuttler

HENRY SCHUTTLER, farmer, Sec. 33; is a native of the city of Chicago, born in 1851, and was for a number of years a member of the Schuttler Wagon Company. IN 1877, he bought his present farm of 158 acres on Sec. 33, town of Oconomowoc, all of which lies within the city limits; he has devoted his time to stock-breeding and agriculture, making a specialty of Durham cattle and barley. He was married in 1875 to Mary Kenkel, a native of Chicago; they have one child.

Joseph Scott

JOSEPH SCOTT, foreman for Vilas & Co., in lumber-yard, was born in the town of Janesville, Rock Co., Wis., in 1849; his parents, Samuel and Maria Scott, emigrated from Scotland and located on a farm in his native town, where they died when he was only 3 years old; he made that his home till 1863, when he removed to Janesville and began the carpenter and joiner's trade, and followed that line of business there till the spring of 1871; coming to Oconomowoc, he continued his trade for two years; he was employed by G. Vilas & Co. in the spring of 1873, and has since been retained in his present position. Mr. Scott has been engineer of the fire company since its organization; he was elected a member of the City Council from the Third Ward in the spring of 1880. He was married in November, 1871, to Miss Phebe L., daughter of Alexander and Laura Murrey, a native of Green Co., Wis., born in September, 1847; her parents were natives of Scotland, and emigrated to that county in 1845; their children are-George A. and Walter J. Mr. And Mrs. S. are members of the Congregational Church; he is a member of the Temple of Honor.

Charles B. Sheldon

CHARLES B. SHELDON, farmer, Sec. 33; P. O. Oconomowoc; the first pioneer of Oconomowoc; was born in the town of Gouverneur, St. Lawrence Co., N. Y., in 1812; his father, a pioneer of that country, was born at Providence, R. I.; he died about 1876; his mother, Nancy Bowen, was also a native of Providence, and died about 1860. Mr. Sheldon spent his life at farming in his native town till 1834, when he emigrated to Iowa, and there spent the winter of 1834-35; coming to Mineral Point, Wis., in the spring of 1835, he engaged in mining for two years, and, while there, learned something of the lands about Milwaukee and this region, which induced him to seek a location in these parts, coming via Janesville, Prairieville (now Waukesha), thence up the Indian trail to Oconomowoc, where he arrived s the first settler April 27, 1837; he made his claim to 160 acres on the east half of Sec. 33, and built his rude pioneer shanty on the creek bank, which sufficed for a dwelling for about ten years; he then built his present house on the north end of his farm, and has made that his home since. He was married in 1845 to Miss Lucinda, daughter of Augustus and Clarinda (Hedges) Cotton, a native of Attica, N. Y., who came with her parents to Oconomowoc in 1844; she died in 1857, leaving three children-Nancy C. (now at home), Albert (married, and now lives on the farm) and Anna M. (who died in 1879). His second marriage was in 1861, to Sarah Brown, nee Rix, a native of Canada, who came to Washington Co., Wis., with her parents, when a child; she had two children-Allie and Samuel Brown-by her former marriage; they have two children-Lizzie and Charles B.

Admund Simons

AMUND SIMONS, of the firm of Olson & Simons, house and sign painters, was born in Norway in 1833. At the age of 20 years, he began the life of a seaman, and in 1857 sailed for America, after which he sailed round Cape Horn to San Francisco and continued on the Atlantic, Pacific and the Great Lakes till 1866; he then located at Oconomowoc, Wis., where he followed various kinds of business till 1873, when he began the painter's trade with J. L. Hastings; a year later, he began work for Olson & Hasting, and in 1877 he formed a copartnership with Mr. Olson, in the present firm of which he is a member. He was married in 1866 to Mrs. Mary Olson, a native of Norway, but then a resident of Oconomowoc; they are members of the Lutheran Church.

Hon. David W. Small

HON. DAVID W. SMALL, was born at Frankfort, Philadelphia County, Peen., December 18, 1827; his father was a farmer, and both parents were members of the Society of Friends; he was reared on his father's farm; prior to his 16th year, he had received only a common-school education; he then spent two years at the Moravian College, at Nazareth, and at the age of 18, he began to teach and read law; in April, 1850, he was admitted to the bar at Doylestown, in his native State, and immediately started for Wisconsin, arriving at Oconomowoc in May of the same year; part of the following two years he spent in surveying, as legal business was quite limited at that time. Mr. Small held some offices of minor importance soon after coming to Oconomowoc, and, after the first two years of his residence here, his law practice became sufficiently large to require his entire attention. In 1862, he was elected District Attorney for Waukesha County, and subsequently re-elected. He was chosen Judge of the Second Judicial Circuit in 1869, re-elected in 1875, and still holds the office. His wife was Miss Susannah Ely; they have three children, one son and two daughters.

Chester M. Smith

CHESTER M. SMITH, was born in the town of Champlain, Jefferson Co., N. Y., in 1819. He began the carpenter and joiner's trade with his father, when 14 or 15 years old, and continued there till 1845. Emigrating then to Wisconsin, he landed in Milwaukee on the 1st day of June, going thence to Eagle Prairie, Waukesha (then Milwaukee) County, where he built a house for Mr. W. W. Tredway, and in the following year he built a mill at what is now known as the Trous Pond, and located there. Removing to the village of Oconomowoc in 1850 with his effects, which consisted of a kit of carpenter tools, and $3, he continued his trade here till 1852. He was then appointed Deputy Sheriff by Patrick Casey, and, after serving two years under him, was re-appointed by Charles Ellis to hold that position during another term. Having lost all he had in a steam-mill in 1854, in 1860 he gather together the little he had accumulated during that time, a wagon, three horses and $100, and went to Colorado, where he engaged in the butcher trade; was interested in a salt spring and various other kinds of business till July 1863; disposing then of his interest there, he returned to Oconomowoc and engaged in the grain, stock and produce trade till 1869. Mr. Smith, like many other enterprising men, has fully realized the "ups and downs" of a business life, but has now retired with a reasonable reward for his energy. He has held the office of Justice of the Peace for fourteen years, School Clerk for six years, School Director for two terms, and Assessor for three terms. He was married in 1851 to Margaret J. White, a native of Ohio, who died at Oconomowoc Nov. 21, 1861, leaving one daughter, Jennie, now the wife of Wm. Collins, of Milwaukee; she has one daughter, Maggie. He was married in January, 1873, to Mary Whipple, of Concord, Jefferson Co., Wis., a native of New York. Their children are Charles M., Minnie and Kittie. Mrs. Whipple now lives with Mr. Smith, and is in her 80th year.

D.B. Smith

D. B. SMITH, teacher; was born in the town of Walcott, Wayne Co., N. Y., March 3, 1836; he removed with his parents, in 1845, to Rochester, N. Y., whence in the following year, they came to Milwaukee, Wis.; locating in the city for a year, they then removed to Wauwatosa, Milwaukee Co., where he attended common school, and made that his home most of the time till 1860; he began teaching at Granville, Milwaukee Co., in 1855, and continued there five years; removing to the town of Porter, Rock Co., in 1860, he followed farming during the summers and teaching during the winters, at Brookfield Junction, Waukesha Co., till 1863, when he returned to Wauwatosa, and taught there till the summer of 1864; he enlisted in August, 1864, in Co. A, 43d, W. V. I., under Col. Cobb, was elected Sergeant, was with the Army of the Cumberland, and was mustered out at Nashville, Tenn., June 24, 1865; returning them to his father's home, in the town of Porter, Rock Co., Wis., he spent the autumn of 1865 at the Milton Academy, and the following winter in teaching at Dunkirk, Dane Co., and re-entered the Academy in the spring of 1866 for that term; he spent eight months Of the summer and autumn of 1866 teaching in the Town of Wauwatosa, Milwaukee Co., and the following winter teaching in the village of Wauwatosa; he removed to Oconomowoc in the spring of 1867, and spent the summer at farming, and in the fall of that year was elected first assistant in the Oconomowoc Public Schools; in 1868, he conducted the Oconomowoc Academy; in 1869, was elected Principal of the Public School of the city, and held that position till 1875 (except three months spent at Pewaukee); he next taught three terms at Morton, Waukesha Co., and was Superintendent of the city schools of Oconomowoc during that time. He taught during the winter of 1878-79 at Menomonee Falls, and in the spring of 1880, was elected to a position in the 12th District School, of Milwaukee, which position he now holds. He was married, in 1868, to Miss Eliza, daughter of W. B. and Emily Bradley, a native of the town of Menomonee, Waukesha Co., Wis., born in 1846; they have one daughter, Lizzie. Mr. Smith is a Royal Arch Mason. His father died March 24, 1873; his mother now lives with him. His family is connected with the Congregational Church.

George Snyder

GEORGE SNYDER, farmer, Sec. 27; P. O. Oconomowoc; was born in Saxony, in July, 1827. His parents, Casper and Margaret Snyder, emigrated with their family to America, in 1840, and settled in the town of Genesee, Waukesha Co., Wis., his father dying there in about two months after their arrival, and left their mother with a family of eight children, of whom our subject was third. George, with an older brother, Anson, ran an extensive breaking team in the town of Merton, from 1845 to 1847, by which they earned money enough to build a barn on the homestead for their mother. In 1844 or 1845, they delivered the first saw-log at Monches. Mr. Snyder bought a claim to 120 acres of land in the Town of Hartford, Washington Co., Wis., and made some improvements, but, in 1850, he, with a company of others, crossed the plains to California, and, after a perilous trip of four months and eleven days, they arrived at the mining district. He engaged in mining successfully for nearly two years, and then returned via the Nicaragua River and New York City, to his home in Wisconsin, after an absence of twenty-six months. He was married, Jan. 6, 1853, to Miss Mary, daughter of Edward and Rose Coyle, a native of the town of Cranston, Providence Co., R. I., born 1830, and she came with her parents to the town of Genesee, Waukesha Co., Wis., in 1847. Her father afterward died in the town of Pewaukee; her mother in Waukesha. Mr. And Mrs. Snyder settled on his farm in Washington Co., Wis., and made that their home for twenty-one years; Feb. 28, 1874, moved to their present farm of 240 acres, on Sec. 27, town of Oconomowoc, for which he paid $15,000 cash in January previous. They have had ten children-Frances E. (deceased), Alexander, Mary A., George A., Adelia J. (deceased), Edward (deceased), Carlos A., Lewis J., John A. and Ernest C. The family is connected with St. Jerome's Catholic Church.

Warren Spaulding

WARREN SPAULDING (deceased); was a native of Putnam Co., N. Y.; born in 1811. His mother dying when he was quite young at the age of 7, he was bound out to learn the tanner and courier's trade, which he afterwards continued at Patterson, N. Y., for a number of years. He was married, Jan. 4, 1835, to Mary V., daughter of Stephen and Phebe Field, a native of Putnam Co., N. Y., born Dec. 2, 1813. In 1836, the young couple settled at Bethel, Conn., and, in 1838, removed to Danbury, Conn., where he continued his trade a number of years, after which he engaged in various kinds of business till 1857; he then emigrated to Waukesha Co., Wis., and located on a farm of 149 acres, on Sec. 29, where he followed farming till his death, which occurred Dec. 16, 1870, leaving five children-Edward T., Frances O. (now the wife of George Spence, and lives in Missouri), Willis H. (now in this town), Ferris A., who was married, in 1873, to Julia, daughter of Theophalus and Amelia Baldwin, a native of Ohio; they have three children-Dollie, Arthur and Lillie, Mary E., now the wife of Charles Spence, and lives in town of Concord, Jefferson Co., Wis. Mr. Spaulding was a member of the Union Church, formerly a Presbyterian.

Fayette M. Spear

FAYETTE M. SPEAR, farmer, Sec. 5; P. O. Town of Summit, within city limits of Oconomowoc; was born in Somerset Co., Maine, Feb. 22, 1828. His mother, Susan Merrill, died when he was about 2 years old; his father, James Spear, afterward married again, and in the autumn of 1847, came to Wisconsin, locating at Hustisford, Dodge Co., where he made his home till 1852 or 1853; then removed to Waushara Co., where he afterward died. F. M. made his home with his father in Maine till 1847, when they came to Wisconsin and left him there to attend school; he came to Hustisford, Wis., and joined his father's family and remained there three or four months, and then went into the pineries on the Wisconsin River, and spent about eight years; returning to Hustisford in 1854, he clerked a year for a brother-in-law; then engaged in the hardware trade, which he continued there for eight years. In December, 1863, he bought his present farm of 130 acres on Sec. 5, town of Summit, 85 acres of which lies within the city limits of Oconomowoc. He was a member of the City Council from Second Ward. He was married at Hustisford, Wis., Oct. 17, 1855, to Lucy A., daughter of Norman and Anna (Brown) Sutliff, a native of Allegany Co., N. Y., born Feb. 22, 1829, and came to Wisconsin in 1853; their children are Frank M., born Feb. 21, 1857; William D., born March 21, 1860 (now in Dakota); Mary A., born Jan. 3, 1863; Mabel M., born May 29, 1864; James R., born June 2, 1866; Milo and Susan (twins), born Jan. 3, 1869 (Milo died Aug. 15, 1869, Susan Aug. 22, 1869); Harry, born Sep. 29, 1873.

Willett Sprague

WILLETT SPRAGUE, carpenter and joiner; was born in Rensselaerville, Albany Co., N. Y., Aug. 27, 1817. He is the son of Stephen Sprague, a native of Long Island, and Jane Winnee, of the town of Rensselaer, Albany Co., N. Y., and of Holland Dutch descent. Mr. Sprague began the carpenter's trade when 16 years old, at Oak Hill, Greene Co., N. Y., and, after serving his apprenticeship of three years with his father-in-law, he continued the trade there till 1842. Nov. 19 of that year, he landed in Milwaukee as an emigrant to Wisconsin, in company with Mr. Howard; they took teams for Menomonee Falls; when they had gone as far as Wauwatosa, he concluded to return to Milwaukee and send his wife on to Menomonee with Mr. H. and his family. He found employ at building the first grist-mill in Milwaukee, and continued his trade there till 1850; coming then to Nashotah, he took charge of the building of the college (Mr. Douglass, the architect). He came to Oconomowoc in 1854, where he has since continued his trade; he worked one year on the grist-mill here; in 1856, was appointed foreman by Martin & Rugee in building the Newhall House of Milwaukee, and continued with them two years after its completion; returning to Oconomowoc, he was employed by the C., M. & St. Paul R. R. Co. for eight months, after which he returned to Milwaukee, and was employed as foreman for Wait & Greene for four years, and since that time has worked at his trade in Oconomowoc and vicinity. He was married, Oct. 23, 1837, to Elizabeth, a step-daughter of George and Mary (Brown) Bartlett. Mrs. B. now lives with them, and is 86 years old. Their children are Gravenor, deceased; Mary, now the wife of A. Burr, and lives at Holland, Wis.; Harriet, now the wife of Eldred Pierce, and lives in Brown Co., Ill.; Frances, now Mrs. John Hogarth, and lives at Toland's Prairie, Washington Co., Wis.; Elizabeth, now Mrs. John Gibbs, of Oconomowoc; Anna A., deceased; George W., now in York, Neb.; Sarah M., deceased; Charles, of York, Neb.; Albert, at home; Edna, at home; James, at home. They attend the M. E. Church. Mr. S. is an Odd Fellow; also a Mason.

Isaac C. Stratton

ISAAC C. STRATTON, carpenter and joiner; was born in Washington Co., N. Y., in 1824, but when very young, his parents removed with him to Bennington Co., Vt., where his mother, Lydia Andrews, a native of Merrimack Co., N. H., died when he was 7 years old. His father, Samuel Stratton, kept him with him in New Hampshire for about two years after his mother's death, then sent him to live with a married sister in Erie Co., N. Y., which was afterward his home for ten years. In 1843, with his brother Samuel Stratton, Jr., he came to Oconomowoc, Wis., where he worked at his trade with Mr. Charles Wilson for about two years; returning, in the spring of 1848, to Vermont, he came again, in the following year, to Oconomowoc, where he spent a year at his trade; he started in the spring of 1850, on a trip through the East and South, visiting South Adams, Mass., New York City, Philadelphia, Harrisburg, Moretta, Ohio, and Williamstown, Wood Co., West Virginia; thence he went to Brighton, Macoupin Co., Ill., where he built two stores, and returned, in the fall of 1852, via St. Paul, to Oconomowoc, where he has since lived and followed his trade most of the time; he worked on the first store built in Oconomowoc during his first stay here. He was married Jan. 1, 1856, to Miss Lydia A. Bingham, a native of Michigan, born in 1835; she was an orphan, and came to Oconomowoc with her aunt, Mrs. Reed; she died Jan. 28, 1868. Their children are Eugene B., born Nov. 1, 1856, and now lives in Minneapolis; Helen M., born Jan. 5, 1858, died Sept. 14, 1858; Emma J., born July 23, 1859, died Oct. 14, 1860; Nellie A., born May 5, 1861; Mary L., born Jan. 3, 1864; George I., born July 26, 1866.

Charles J. Strohn

CHARLES J. STROHN, farmer, Sec. 26; P. O. Oconomowoc; was born in Prince Edward District, Hastings Co., Canada West, in 1830, and is the son of Daniel and Martha Strohn. In 1846, a boy of 16 summers, he left his father's home to try his fortune in the wilds of the Territory of Wisconsin. Coming alone to Waukesha County, he made a claim to 80 acres on Sec. 22, town of Oconomowoc; he at once began to improve it, and, as he earned means, he enlarged his farm, and made that his home for about ten y ears, removing then to Sec. 20, he followed farming there for about eight years, and in 1865 bought his present farm of 220 acres on Secs. 26 and 35, where he has since lived. He was married in 1854 to Miss Mary, a daughter of James and Barbara Ray, of the town of Merton, but a native of Scotland; she died in February, 1856. His second marriage was Feb. 11, 1857, to Miss Maria, daughter of David and Elizabeth Lasher, a native of Columbia Co., N. Y., and came to Oconomowoc, Wis., with her parents in 1845, where her parents afterward died. Their children are David D., born July 29, 1858; Jennie E., born Jul 29, 1860; Mary E., born June 29, 1863, died March 18, 1869; William N., born Oct. 18, 1865, died Feb. 19, 1874; George, born June 18, 1872. Mr. and Mrs. Strohn are members of the Congregational Church.

Thomas M. Stuart

THOMAS M STUART was born in Lincoln Co., Maine, Oct 10, 1810; his father, Timothy Stuart, was born at Martha's Vineyard Aug 27, 1770; his mother, Jedediah Pease, was also a native of Martha's Vineyard, born June 3, 1768. Soon after their marriage, which occurred about January 26, 1792, they removed to Lincoln Co., Me., where they located on a farm, and made that their home for many years; his mother died May 19, 1815; his father about 1836. Thomas M., our present subject, spent his time on the farm with parents till 8 years old, and then went to live with his grandfather at Martha's Vineyard, Mass., where he remained till 1845. He was married there in February, 1833, to Miss Mary N., daughter of Daniel and Mary Norton Butler, a native of that place, born April 27, 1815. They came to Wisconsin in 1845, and located on a farm in the town of Lisbon, Waukesha Co., and in 1850 removed to the town of Fountain Prairie, Columbia Co., Wis.; lived there four or five years; thence they went to Beaver Dam, and kept a boarding house two years, but made that their home three and a half years; then returned to Fountain Prairie, Columbia Co., and lived on the farm till 1870, when they came to Oconomowoc, where they have since resided; they have had five children-Permelia, born March 21, 1834, now Mrs. Babcock, and lives in the city of Oconomowoc; Martha A., now the wife of Jacob Vanhorn, and lives in this city; Hannah H., born May 31, 1838, died Oct. 27, 1839; Sarah M., born July 26, 1846, died Oct. 9, 1847; Frank L., born May 5, 1850, now lives at Burlington, Wis. Mr. and Mrs. Stuart attend the M. E. Church.

Cephas L. Sturtevant

CEPHAS L. STURTEVANT was born in the town of Verona, Oneida Co., N. Y., in 1822, and son of Cephas Sturtevant, a native of Vermont, and Elizabeth, daughter of James Lawrence, a lineal descendant of the Lawrence family in England, whose heirs have been advertised for. They removed, as early settlers, to Oneida Co., N. Y., and made that their home till they died; his father April 1, 1864; his mother about two years later. Mr. Sturtevant received an academic education at Verona Springs, N. Y., after which he followed teaching in Oneida Co. till 1853, when he removed to Rockford, Ill., and continued that profession in Winnebago County till 1861; he then enlisted in the 4th Wis. Battery at Beloit, Wis., under Capt. John S. Vallee, and served with McClellan's army through the South till the close of the war, and was mustered out at Madison, Wis., in February, 1865; he then removed to Oconomowoc, Wis., where he has since lived. He began the furniture trade in 1867, and continued that till 1869, when he was appointed Deputy P. M. at Oconomowoc, under Gen. Starkweather, and held that position till 1871; he was next ticket agent at this place for the C., M. & St. P. R. R. Co. from June, 1873, till Sept. 1878, since which time he has been engaged at painting and paper hanging. He was married July, 1845, to Miss Rachel A., daughter of John and Anna Allen Yorke, a native of Otsego Co., N. Y.; their children are, Melora R., the late wife of William Spear, of Liscomb, Marshall Co., Iowa, now deceased; Detta C., now the wife of L. L. Disbro, and lives in Milwaukee; L. Luella at home. Mr. S. and family attend the Congregational Church. He is a member of the I. O. O. F. and T. of H.

Stephen Taylor

STEPHEN TAYLOR was born in the town of Lisbon, St. Lawrence Co., N. Y., in March, 1828; his mother dying when he was quite young, at the age of 9 years he began the life of a sailor as cabin boy, and went as such on different vessels on the lakes, till 14 years old; he then worked at farming in the town of Herman, St. Lawrence Co., N. Y., for five years; after which he followed the molder's trade at Gouverneur, St. Lawrence Co., for four years; then removed to Buffalo, and there continued one summer; he next began farming and teaming, and in 1851 emigrated to McHenry Co., Ill., where he farmed till 1853, whence he came to the town of Summit, Waukesha Co., Wis., and continued farming a year; removed to Oconomowoc in 1854, he followed various vocations till 1860, when he purchased an ox team and began teaming. The oxen served him faithfully till he bought a span of horses and began a regular draying business. He was married in August, 1852, to Miss Almira, daughter of Job and Henrietta Brown Warner, a native of Erie Co., Penn., born in 1828; her mother died when she was quite young; in 1837 she removed to Chautauqua Co., N. Y., whence, in 1841, she came to Kenosha Co., Wis. They had six children, one son and five daughters, all of whom died when young. Mr. and Mrs. Taylor are members of the M. E. Church.

Dennis R. Thompson

DENNIS R. THOMPSON, Deputy Postmaster; was born in the town of Hampton, Washington Co., N. Y., in 1820; his father, Bela Thompson, was born at Brookfield, Mass.; his mother, Deadamia Kellogg, a daughter of Judge Jason Kellog, was born in the town of Hampden, Washington Co. N. Y.; Dennis R. with his parents moved to Genesee Co. N. Y., in 1835, and a few years later to Wyoming County, where they afterward died; he came to Wisconsin in 1846, and located in the town of Lagrange, Walworth Co., where he followed farming during the summers and teaching in the winters for several years; he was also School Commissioner and Town Superintendent while there, except the first year; removing in 1852 to Waterville, Waukesha Co., he engaged in teaching there till 1854, when he came to Oconomowoc and became interested in the commission business for a few years; he was appointed deputy sheriff in 1858 by C. W. Bennett, and was reappointed in 1860 by James Clark; in 1862, he received the appointment of Deputy Provost Marshal, from J. H. Tillapaugh, and held that during Mr. Tillapaugh's term of office, and also for two years under Capt. J. M. Beam; in September, 1864 he was appointed to fill vacancy in the office of the County Superintendent of Schools of Waukesha Co., caused by the resignation of A. D. Hendrickson, and in December, 1865, he was appointed Postmaster at Oconomowoc by the Postmaster General, A. W. Randall, and remained in that position till March, 1869; he next engaged in the grocery trade till 1876, when he was appointed Deputy Postmaster, by Col. W. Parks, which position he now holds; he has also held several local offices, among them Town Treasurer; Town Clerk Justice of the Peace; and Assessor. He was married in 1844 to Miss Maria H., daughter of the Rev. Charles Knight, a Methodist minister of Newstead, N. Y.; her parents came to Wisconsin about 1844; their children are as follows, Arthur Dewitt, who died at Oconomowoc in 1858, aged 15 years; Albert B., who died at Oconomowoc in December, 1874, at the age of 28 years; he was a soldier in the 28th W. V. I., for three years; Ernest D. R., now a practicing attorney in Oconomowoc; Carrie L. Mr. Thompson and family are members of the Congregation church; he has been a Mason for 25 years.

William Thompson

WILLIAM THOMPSON, grain dealer; was born in the town of Attica, Wyoming Co., N. Y., in 1826. His parents, William and Eunice (Nelson) Thompson, were natives of Massachusetts, but removed to Wyoming County, and bought a farm on what was then known as the Holland purchase, where his father made his home for more than sixty years, and afterward came to Oconomowoc; he died in Jackson Co., Wis., Dec. 15, 1879, at the age of 91 years and 10 days; his mother died in Wyoming Co. N. Y., in 1841, leaving four sons and two daughters, all of whom came to Wisconsin. Mr. Thompson, our present subject, made his home with his father on the farm till 18 years old; then in 1844 emigrated to Wisconsin and located at Oconomowoc, where he engaged at saw-milling, farming, coopering, etc., for a year, and from 1845 to 1860 he followed carpentering and building, being connected with the erection of many of the older buildings of this city; he began dealing in grain in 1860, and has since followed that business, except two years spent at farming in Winnebago County. Mr. Thompson was the first Chairman of the village Board and by virtue of his office a member of the County Board; he was a member of the Wisconsin Assembly from his district of Waukesha County in 1868. He was married in 1848, to Miss Martha, daughter of Caleb and Ann Scovil, a native of Connecticut, and came with her parents to Oconomowoc in 1845; her father died in Winnebago Co., Wis., in Nov. 1871; her mother now lives with them. Their children are, Franklin, now in York, York Co. Neb.; Ada, now the wife of Charles Wadsworth, and lives in Washington Co. Neb.; Hellen, at home; Lina, at home; Edward, at home. Mrs. Thompson is a member of the M. E. Church.

Charles Thompson

CHARLES THOMPSON, farmer, Sec. 30 and 31; P. O. Oconomowoc; was born in the town of Attica, Wyoming Co., N. Y., May 18,1824; was the son of Willard and Eunice Thompson, with whom he lived, and worked at farming till 1844; in May of that year came to Oconomowoc, Wis., and made a claim, and some improvements on it, in the town of Ixonia, Jefferson Co., but settled in the village of Oconomowoc, where he was the first butcher, and followed the business from the spring of 1846 till 1855, when he went into the produce and general traffic business; in December, 1856, he removed to his present farm of 130 acres, he also has 44 acres in the town of Ixonia, Jefferson Co. He was married in October, 1856, to Elizabeth E., daughter of Budd and Mary Parsons, a native of Maine, who came to Oconomowoc in 1849 with her parents; she died Oct. 3, 1877, leaving two children, Charles H., and Mary E. Thompson.

Copeland Townsend

COPELAND TOWNSEND, deceased, Oconomowoc. The subject of this sketch was born at Attica, N. Y., Aug. 10, 1825; he was one of a large family of ten children, receiving as liberal an education as the time of his early days offered; his father, Isaac Townsend, a lineal descendant of the three brothers by that name, who came over in the Mayflower, was a native of Norridgewock, Me., and was a man of great energy, enterprise and business ability; he later removed to Attica, N. Y., where he made extensive purchases at the "Holland land sale," and afterward made that his home, till his death, at the age of 53 years; his mother, Clarissa Copeland, was also a native of Norridgewock, but died in Wyoming Co., N. Y. In 1849 Mr. Townsend was joined in marriage to Miss S. Eliza Alvord, and the young couple immediately removed to Wisconsin in search of a home and fortune in the then Far West; he came to Beloit and engaged in the mercantile business for one year; they then went to Neenah, at that time a small settlement; he built and commanded as captain the first steamboat that ever parted the placid waters of Lake Winnebago, called the "Van Ness Barlow;" this enterprise proved too far in advance of the necessities of the day, and he lost all his investment, the earnings of a number of years' hard labor; sharing in the excitement of the gold discoveries of California, he then went across the plains to the Golden State, and engaged in the lumber trade, which proved largely remunerative, but afterward invested in numerous unfortunate speculations and lost all; next he established in Denver, Colo., in the mercantile business, and later again in San Francisco, and in a great measure regained his lost fortune; during these and the two or three succeeding years he traveled largely through the British Possessions, Southern and Central America, returning to make his home with his family in Oconomowoc, afterward removing to Fond du Lac. In 1861 he applied to President Lincoln, with strong recommendations, and received the appointment as U. S. Marshal for Colorado Territory; while there he built the first prison erected in the Territory; the issues of the war brought on difficulty to the Federal offices, and Mr. Townsend shared with others in have charges in having charges preferred against him at the department in Washington; he went at once to Washington and demanded an investigation, and the final outcome was that President Lincoln, who became so strongly attached to him that he tendered him the choice of commission for a number of vacancies in the civil service, among them, paymaster of the Navy, position of Auditor in the Treasury Department, or as Indian Agent of Idaho Territory; the latter appointment he accepted in 1863, serving two years; after resigning this Federal position he engaged in business in San Francisco for the third time, in which venture he was very successful; in 1868 he again took up his residence in Oconomowoc, but soon after engaged as a traveling salesman for a New York firm, at a liberal salary. Mr. Townsend's extensive travels and varied experience, led him to believe that Oconomowoc, with her great picturesque beauty and natural advantages, was destined to become a resort for tourists; so thoroughly was he impressed with this idea, that he resolved to invest his accumulated means in a hotel for this purpose solely; the venture was a risky one, but with his characteristic enterprise he staked his all upon his well-grounded opinion that success would crown his efforts; in February, 1870, he began building the Townsend House, the first hotel in the State exclusively for tourists; by the following June the hotel was complete, furnished and opened to the reception of guests. Mr. Townsend is surely the originator of the summer resort business of the West; to him more than to any other individual is due the credit of making Oconomowoc her reputation as a resort; four successful seasons followed, and the Townsend House was found too limited in accommodation; in 1874 the hotel was doubled in size, and the two disastrous seasons which followed, found the proprietor almost hopelessly involved in debt. As a writer Mr. Townsend was clear and concise, and his descriptions of some of his travels through the West are almost "word paintings;" his articles appeared in the Badger, to which he was quite a regular contributor, over the signature of "Tragic;" his close observation, extensive travels and great descriptive ability gave him much power as a lecturer, and in his travels as a business man he was often called upon to give public lectures on his travels and adventures among the Mormons in the great Salt Lake Valley, which were "very spicy, entertaining and instructive." Copeland Townsend was a man of strong mind and had decided opinions upon all social and political questions; he possessed indomitable will power, and had the courage to carry it out; his travels and profession as a hotel keeper made him a large acquaintance, and his eccentricities doubtless made him some enemies-rare indeed are the men who have none. He was an enterprising and public-spirited citizen; he was a leader rather than a follower of opinion; as a conversationalist few men could be more entertaining or agreeable as a companion; in his death Oconomowoc loses a good citizen, and his family a beloved and respected father. Mr. Townsend leaves a widow and three children-two sons, Eldridge G. and Copeland, and a daughter, Clara, now Mrs. Dr. Dorion, of St. Paul; they had lost a daughter, Love, who died Sept. 6, 1874, at the age of 8 years. Mr. Townsend was a Swendenborgien in his religious opinions, and was of strictly religious inclinations.

George Vilas

GEORGE VILAS, lumber merchant; was born at Oswego, Oswego Co., N. Y., in 1830, and when 2 or 3 years old, his parents removed with him to Cayuga Co.; his mother, Betsey Dickerson, a native of Vermont, died when he was quite young; his father, Nathaniel Vilas, was a native of New Hampshire, and removed to York State in an early day; he was a tanner by trade and followed that line of business in Oswego and Cayuga Counties till 1850; emigrating then to Wisconsin, they located in the town of Caledonia, Racine Co. Our present subject worked at the tanner's trade with his father, in Cayuga Co., N. Y., and emigrated with him to Wisconsin in 1850; he engaged in saw-milling and lumbering for five years, in the town of Caledonia, Racine Co.; removing to Fulton, Rock Co., in 1855, he engaged in the grocery trade for two years, then removed to Delavan, Walworth Co., and engaged in a general mercantile trade till 1863; he then removed to Pardeeville, Columbia Co., and engaged in milling and grain dealing till 1869, when he came to Oconomowoc, and has since been dealing in lumber. He was married at Pardeeville, in 1860 to Miss Jane L., daughter of John and Eunice Pardee, a sister of John S. Pardee, the founder of the village; she was born in Ohio, but came with her parents as early settlers at Pardeeville. Mr. and Mrs. Vilas have two daughters-Mary V. and Helen M., now students at the Normal school of White Water. The family are members of the Episcopal Church.

Charles Vroman

CHARLES VROMAN, farmer, Sec. 9; P. O. Monterey; son of Josiah and Susan Vroman; was born in Bradford Co., Penn., in 1826, and came to Waukesha Co., Wis., in 1849, and located at Monterey, town of Oconomowoc, where he has since resided on Sec. 9; his parents came in the following year; he now owns a farm of 90 acres on that section. He was married in Pennsylvania, in 1845, to Hannah M., daughter of George and Eliza Decker, a native of Walton, Delaware Co., Penn. Mr. and Mrs. Vroman are members of the M. E. Church.

Stephen Vroman

STEPHEN VROMAN, farmer, Sect. 9; P. O. Monterey; was born in Schoharie Co., N. Y., in Nov. 1801; when 19 years old he removed to Bradford Co., Penn., where he joined his parents, Josiah B. and Susan Vroman, who had removed to that county a few years before that time; here he spent his time at farming till 1850, when, with the family, he emigrated to Wisconsin and located at Monterey, Waukesha Co. He engaged in hotel-keeping and followed that line of business most of the time till 1875, since which time he has devoted his attention to agriculture. He was married in Pennsylvania May 20, 1830, to Miss Polly, daughter of Ezra and Ruthy -----, a native of Bradford Co., Penn.; their children are Jacob, now in Adams Co., Wis.; Ezra, now proprietor of the Exchange Hotel of Monterey; Patience, now the wife of L. F. Rowell and lives in Lyon Co., Minn.

William K. Washburn

WILLIAM K. WASHBURN, was born in the town of Attica, Wyoming Co., N. Y., Feb. 18, 1825; his father, Lewis Washburn, was a native of Taunton, Mass., and served as a soldier in the war of 1812, and afterward located in Genesee, now Wyoming Co., N. Y., where he married Betsey Kerne, a native of New York; they raised a family of nine children, with whom they arrived as emigrants at Oconomowoc, Wis., May 12, 1843, and located on a farm in section 31 of this town, where Mr. Washburn died in 1857, and his wife in the fall of 1868. William K. spent two years on the farm with his father, and in 1845, with his brother C. D. M. Washburn and C. Wood, built a small boat, and left Oconomowoc, sailing down the Oconomowoc River; they returned via Indiana, where they spent one year, and reached their home again in October 1846. He was employed in the spring of 1850, to assist in the engineering and laying of the Plank Road from Milwaukee to Watertown, and in 1852, at its completion, he was placed in charge of the men and repairs of the road, and remained in that position till 1855, when he resigned, having gone into the grain trade in 1584, which he continued more or less of the time till 1868; since that time he has been engaged in laying out and grading streets, making lawns etc.; he was Street Commissioner of the city in 1875, '77 and '78. He was married in September, 1855, to Miss Mary G., daughter of William J. Brown, a native of New Hampshire, but came to the town of Pewaukee, Waukesha Co., Wis., in 1853; their children are Nellie, William K. Jr., and Harry. Mr. Washburn's family are connected with the Episcopal Church.

J.A. Welch

J. A. WELCH, proprietor of livery stable; was born in Steuben Co., N. Y., in January, 1843, and in 1850 came with his parents to Wisconsin; he located on a farm in the town of Sugar Creek, Walworth Co., and made that his home till 1868, when he removed to Johnson, Mo., and followed farming till 1877; he then returned to Walworth County, and in January, 1878, formed a copartnership with A. Kinney in the livery business in this city; the firm was dissolved Sept. 4, 1879, Mr. Welch buying out Mr. Kinney at that time, and has since continued the business alone. He was married in 1861 to Miss Lucy A., daughter of Robert Bentley, of the town of La Fayette, Walworth Co., Wis.; their children are Halbert E. and Royston. They attend the Congregational Church.

Jacob Weltner

JACOB WELTNER, carpenter and joiner; was born in Charles City Co., Va., in January, 1839. He began the carpenter and joiner's trade when 17 years of age, and after following that a short time, became a contractor and builder, which he continued for some time along the line from the Rappahannock to Richmond; in 1859 he went to Lexington, Mo., whence in 1861 he came to Oconomowoc, where he has since followed his trade has been connected with the erection of some of the most prominent buildings, among them the Townsend House, Captain Parker's, Dr. Henchal's, Shufeldt's residences, besides many others. He was appointed Deputy Sheriff by John Porter in 1878, and has held the position for two years. He was married at Lexington, Mo., in Oct. 1859, to Miss Emily, daughter of Mr. Meyer; they have one daughter, Emily; they lost a son (Herman) at Oshkosh in Nov. 1879, aged 18 years and 4 days. Mr. Weltner;s family are connected with the M.E. Church. He has been connected with the I.O.O.F. for sixteen years, and is now Deputy Grand Master of that order in Waukesha Co. He is also the Master of the A.O.U.W. for this county.

Edward Whalen

EDWARD WHALEN,farmer, Sec. 7; P.O. Monterey; was born in County of Wexford, Ireland, March 18, 1818; he followed farming there until 1850, when he emigrated to America and located in Herkimer County, N.Y., whence, in Oct., 1853, he came to Oconomowoc and located where he now is, and owns 160 acres of land. He was married in Herkimer County, N.Y., in 1852 to Elizabeth, daughter of James and Ann Sullivan, a native of County Lowth, who came to America, 1849. There children are Ann, born October, 1853; Edward, born April 25, 1855; Thomas, born July 13, 1857; William, born Dec. 5, 1859, died Sept. 29, 1865. Mr. Whalen is a member of St. James' Catholic Church, Oconomowoc.

O.H. Wilbur

O.H. WILBUR, farmer, Sec. 34; P.O. Oconomowoc; was born in the town of Kingsbury, Washington Co., N.Y., in 1811; when 18 years old he began the tanner and currier's trade, at Ft. Ann, Washington Co., and after working two and a half years at his trade there, he went to Troy, N.Y., where he finished his apprenticeship and continued his trade a year longer; he went then to New Brunswick, N.J., and to Albany, N.Y., continuing his trade at the latter place two years, and afterward returned to Ft. Ann, and later still he went to Granville, N.Y., where he run (sic) a tannery a year; he next moved to Hebron, N.Y. where he carried on the business fourteen years; he came to Oconomowoc, Waukesha Co., Wis. in 1854, and located at Okauchee, where he made his home till 1865, when he removed to his present home of 80 acres, on Sec. 34, town of Oconomowoc, having bought it the previous year. He was married at Albany, N.Y., in 1836, to Miss Abagail L., daughter of Loami Carter, a native of Lynn, Essex Co., Mass.; she died at her home in Oconomowoc, in 1873; they had eight children, as follows: Clarrinda, deceased, Albert, Orrin, David, at home, two infant daughters (twins), deceased, Mary, deceased, Melvin, deceased. Mr. Wilbur was a member of the Town Board one term; Assessor of the town eight years.

Ole Wilhelmsen

OLE WILHELMSEN, Pastor of the Norwegian Evangelical Lutheran Church, of Oconomowoc; was born in Norway, in 1844; he received his early education in the schools of his native parish; in 1862, he entered the Seminary of Stovd, Norway, where he continued his studies till 1864; he then began teaching there, and, in the spring of 1865, emigrated to America; locating in Worth County, Iowa, he taught in the parish schools of his church there, and in Winnebago County, till 1869; he then entered upon the study of language at Lutheran College, at Decorah, where he pursued his studies a year, then entered the Theological Seminary, and continued his studies for two years; he came then to La Crosse, Wis., in the summer of 1872, and in June passed his examination before the Synod and was ordained to the Holy Ministry; he went then to Eureka, Greenwood Co., Kan., where he was Pastor of a church till 1875; returning then to Wisconsin, he located in the town of Ixonia, Jefferson Co., and has been Pastor of the Norwegian Lutheran Churches at Rock River, Ashippun, Stone Bank, and Oconomowoc. He was married in Winnebago Co., Iowa, in 1868, to Rachel, daughter of H. Halverson; their children are Stina, Hartwick, Anna Valburg, Mary A.

William Wilke

WILLIAM WILKE, mason; was born in Prussia in 1823; he began the stone and mason trade in his native country in 1847, and followed it there till 1855, when he emigrated to America; stopping a short time in Milwaukee; he went thence to Watertown, Wis., where he continued his trade till the autumn of 1856; he then came to Oconomowoc, where he has since resided and devoted his time to his trade. He was married in Berlin, Prussia, in 1852, to Augusta Flade, a native of that country, they have one daughter, Emma. Mr. and Mrs. Wilke are members of the Lutheran Church.

George W. Williams

GEORGE W. WILLIAMS, farmer, Sec. 28; P. O. Oconomowoc; was born in the town of Russell, Hampden Co., Mass., in 1810; at the age of ten years, he, with his parents, Dudley and Mary Williams, removed to Portage County, Ohio, where he engaged in farming for a few years, and afterward began dealing in "mora multa caulis," or silkworm-food, by which he lost all he had; in May, 1841, he, with his wife and daughter, emigrated to Wisconsin, and, the 19th day of that month, landed at Oconomowoc, where he traded his horse and wagon for a claim of 160 acres in Sec. 28; he built his shanty on the old Indian trail from Milwaukee to Fond du Lac, and has since made his home on that quarter-section; his shanty has, however, long since been exchanged for amore comfortable residence. He was married in 1833, to Nancy M. Ferry, a native of Ohio; they have one daughter-Mary E. (now Mrs. Hadley), who has two sons-one, George W. Munger, by her first marriage, and Dudley A. Hadley by her second marriage; Mrs. Hadley and her sons live with Mr. Williams.

Louise C. Williams

LOUISE C. WILLIAMS, Notary Public; was born in Manlius, Onondaga Co., N. Y., in 1837; her father, Deacon F. H. Westover, was a native of Massachusetts; her mother, Phebe Miller, was born in Oswego County, N. Y.; Mrs. Williams came with her parents to Milwaukee in 1846, where she received her earlier education in private schools, and completed her studies at the Female College of that city in 1855. She was married January 14, 1862, to Mr. James Williams, then First Lieutenant of Company A, Fourth Wisconsin Cavalry; the regiment begin encamped, at that time, at Baltimore, Miss Westover met Mr. Williams there, and the marriage ceremony was performed by Chaplain A. C. Bory, at the Major's tent; she remained there with her husband three weeks, when orders came for the regiment to march, when she returned to her father's, in Summit, Wis.; Mr. Williams was killed at the battle of Baton Rouge, La., March 4, 1864; Mrs. Williams came with her parents to Oconomowoc in September, 1866, and, in 1871, became a student and book-keeper in the law office of her brothers, George F. and J. Henry Westover, and, in 1874, she was appointed, by Gov. Taylor, Notary Public-the first lady Notary Public in Wisconsin, if not the first in the United States; she remained in the office with her brothers till 1877, and, since that time, she has been collecting claims, loaning money and making transfers of real estate; her father died at Oconomowoc in 1874; her mother, now 77 years old, lives with her.

A.W. Willis

A. W. WILLIS, telegraph operator; was born in the town of Canaan, Grafton Co., N. H., in 1850; his parents, Nathan and Edna Willis, were also natives of New Hampshire; his father was a carpenter and joiner by trade; he began the study of telegraphy at Enfield, N. H., in 1869, and, in 1871, came to Wisconsin and engaged as operator for the C., M. & St. P. R. R. Co. at Prairie du Chien, Wis.; he was stationed there two years, then at Dekorra one year, thence called to Milwaukee, whence, in 1875, he was sent to Oconomowoc, where he has since remained. He was married in 1877 to Miss A. May, daughter of Josiah and Sarah (Calkins) Streeter, a native of Gasport, Niagara Co., N. Y.; their children are Edna L. and Annie; they attend the Congregational Church; Mr. Willis is a member of the Masonic fraternity.

Theodore Worthington

THEODORE WORTHINGTON, deceased; was born in Northfield, Washington Co., Vt., in 1817, and is the son of Daniel and Polly (Fisk) Worthington; he, with three brothers, Elijah, David and Daniel, came to Wisconsin 1836; Elijah settled on a farm in Walworth County, and was also a local preacher there for a number of years before his death; Theodore settled there with his parents, who came two years later; David went to St. Louis, Mo., for several years; then removed to Chicago and made a purchase near Union Park, where he now resides; David lived in Milwaukee for a few years, and became in later years a prominent M. E. minister; was stationed at Rock Island, Ill., Dubuque, Iowa, and afterward at Mount Pleasant, Iowa, where he died; Theodore made his home on the farm with his parents in the town of La Grange, Walworth Co., till 1844, when he came to Oconomowoc, Waukesha Co., and bought a claim to 160 acres now within the city limits, where he followed farming for many years, but later dealt in real estate; he died April 15, 1875. He was married in 1845 to Miss Orilla, daughter of Zaddoc and Polly (Muzzy) Williams, a native of Genesee, now Wayne Co., N. Y., but came to Oconomowoc in 1845. Their children are, James, deceased; George, deceased; Henry, deceased; Frank, who married Rosa Martin in June, 1876; they have had two daughters, Edith, deceased; Ora Belle; and Mrs. Worthington is a member of the M. E. Church.

Charles W. Wood

CHARLES W. WOOD, farmer, Sec. 31; P. O. Oconomowoc; was born at Attica, N. Y., in 1840; his father, James K. Wood, was born in Massachusetts, and removed to Attica, N. Y., when about 8 years old, and afterwards made his home in New York, till 1842; his mother was a native of York State. They emigrated to Wisconsin in 1842, and located in the town of White Water, Walworth Co., where his father followed the blacksmith's trade till 1844, when they removed to their present home on Sec. 31, town of Oconomowoc, where he now owns 66 acres. Charles W. began the painter's trade when ten years old, with his father, who was also a painter, as well as blacksmith, and has followed it more or less of the time since, in connection with farming. He was married in 1872 to Miss Caroline, daughter of John and ---- Younker, a native of Germany. They have one daughter, Caroline C.

William H. Young

WILLIAM H. YOUNG, manufacturer of wagons and buggies; was born in Onondaga Co., N.Y., in 1826, and when 7 years old, with his parents, Jacob and Ruth Young, he removed to the town of Litchfield, Hillsdale Co., Mich., where he worked on a farm till nearly 21 years old; he began his apprenticeship at the wagon and carriage maker's trade in Jonesville, Mich., and finished at Ashtabula, and established a manufacturing and repairing shop, where he has since carried on that business. He was married Nov. 1, 1849, to Miss Hanna M., a daughter of Luther and Hanna Hatch, a native of Pennsylvania, but her parents of Vermont; they afterward removed to Ohio. Their children are, Alice, now the wife of D. Hatch, and lives in Oshkosh, Wis.; Lewis M., now of the firm of Kern & Young, of this city; Eva I., deceased; Charles M., at home. Mrs. Young is a member of the Congregational Church.

Henry Zimmerman

HENRY ZIMMERMAN, tailor; was born in Prussia, March 31, 1823, and at the age of 18 years began the tailor's trade, which he has since followed; he immigrated to America in 1856, and located at Oconomowoc, where he has since continued his trade; he has been with Mr. Peters for the past nineteen years. He was married in 1851 to Miss Ernestina, daughter of John and Sophia Wolfgram, a native of Prussia, born May 4, 1827. Their children are Matilda, now the wife of A. Krause, and lives in Algona, Wis; Ernestina, who died at the age of 1 year and 10 months; Albertina, the late wife of Adolph Genrich, now deceased; Henry deceaased (sic); Martha, now Mrs. Joseph Dusse, and lives in Kansas; Henry, and Laura, at home. Mr. Zimmerman and family are members of the Lutheran Church.