Biographies

From "History of Waukesha County" by Western Historical Company, Chicago 1880

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JOSEPH ADAMS, farmer, Sec. 17; P.O. Summit Center; was born in Cambridgeshire, England, in 1840; emigrated with his parents, Robert and Ann Adams, to Wisconsin in 1855; they located in Racine County, where his father died in 1866, and where he spent his time at farming till 18 years old; he then went to Milwaukee, where he was engaged in various kinds of business till 1870, when he came to the town of Summit, and located on the Putney farm, which he managed for three years; then removed to the "Jimmy Stewart" farm, in the town of Ottawa, for a year; whence he went to the town of Oconomowoc, and in 1875, bought his present farm of 140 acres. He was married, in 1858, to Sarah E., daughter of James and Lucinda Ash, a native of Green Co., Wis.; their children are Silas E., Thomas W., Robert L., Lucinda A., and Sarah R. Mr. Adams' mother now lives with him, and is in her 83d year.


REV. WILLIAM ADAMS, D.D., graduate of Trinity College, Dublin; born in 1813; arrived in the United States in 1838, immediately after his graduation; he is a graduate of the General Theological Seminary of New York City; author of "Elements of Christian Science," "Mercy to Babes," "A Treatise on Infant Baptism," and other works. He has been a resident of Wisconsin since 1841, and professor of systematic Divinity at the Nashotah House since 1842.


JAMES M. BAILEY, farmer, Sec. 8; P.O. Oconomowoc; was born in Addison Co., Vt., in 1808; removed with his parents, Belah and Betsey Baily, to Ticonderoga, Sussex Co., N.Y., when young; here he made his home on a farm until the age of 30, working a portion of the time at the wagonmaker's trade; he went to Plattsburg, Clinton Co., where he followed the carpenter and joiner's trade until 1855; he then emigrated to Wisconsin and located at Summit Corners, and worked at his trade until 1857; he was then appointed Postmaster, which position he held for six months; after which he continued at his trade till 1863, when he was re-appointed Postmaster for a time; after the expiration of this time as Postmaster, he resumed his vocation of carpenter and continued it until 1868, when he moved onto his farm of 80 acres, where he now resides. He was married in Worcester Co., Mass., Jan 15, 1837, to Miss Alice Dwinnel, a native of Oxford; she died in Ticonderoga in 1839, having had two children, one dying April 7, the other the 18th, and she the last day of the same month; his second marriage was Feb. 23, 1842, to Mary Hammond, a native of Ticonderoga; she died in the town of Summit Jan 21, 1858; his third marriage occurred Sept 22, 1858, to Julia Burt, of Montgomery Co., Vt; their children are Mary I., Wm. J., and Charles I. They are members of the M.E. Church.


EDWIN W. BARNARD, farmer, Sec. 15; P. O. Summit; he was born at Hartford, Conn., in 1838; when 4 or 5 years old, he removed with his parents to Albany, N. Y.; whence, in 1845, then came to Waukesha Co., Wis., and located at Waterville, where his father was engaged in merchandising till his death, which occurred April 1, 1857. Edwin, the subject of this sketch, made his home with his mother, at Waterville, till 1862, when, on Dec.,31 of that year, he was married to Emma, a daughter of John D. and Sophia (Brown) McDonald, a native of the town of Summit; they settled, soon after marriage, on Sec. 27, which was their home till 1866, and in the year following he bought his present farm of 160 acres, where he has since resided; they have two daughters - Emma M. and Henrietta R.


ISAAC BENTON, farmer, Sec. 10; P. O., Oconomowoc; was born in Erie Co., Ohio, in 1833; he emigrated, with his parents, Jonas M. and Maria (Furman) Denton, to Wisconsin in 1850, spending the winter in Elkhorn, Walworth Co.; in the spring of 1851, they settled on a farm in the town of Concord, Jefferson Co., Wis.; he made that his home most of the time till 1862, when, in the fall of that year, he enlisted in Co. E, 28th Wis. V. l., and was with his regiment in the army of the West, till mustered out at Brownsville, Texas, in September, 1865; he then returned to his father's home, in Concord, and spent five years, at which time he purchased the homestead, his father then removing to Jefferson. In 1877, he disposed of the above farm and bought his present property, in Sec. 10, in the town of Summit, Waukesha Co. He was married in 1867, to Elizabeth, daughter of Charles and Clarissa Neff, of Waterville, Wis.; their children are Charles and Gertrude.


HENRY BOWRON, farmer, Sec. 23; P. O. Waterville; was born at Champlain, Clinton Co., N. Y., Sept. 1, 1807; his parents, Joseph and Mary (Fox) Bowron, were also natives at Clinton Co.; at the age of 21 years, he began clerking in a dry-goods store at Champlain, working for two different, merchants two years each; he next clerked for a lumber merchant at that place until the fall of 1836, when he landed in Milwaukee as a pioneer of Wisconsin; he spent the winter clearing 15 acres of land at Kilbourn Hill, near Milwaukee; and in the spring of 1837, with his goods in a bandana handkerchief, he started on foot for Waukesha, where he stopped with Cutler, by whose fire he baked his bread for the winter; here he followed the carpenter and joiner's trade and other kinds of business till 1861, when he moved to his present farm of 148 acres, in the town of Summit; he was Assessor of Waukesha for twenty years, and of Summit one year. He was married in Waukesha to Helen Campbell, a native of Vernon, Oneida Co., N. Y., who died Jan. 8, 1879, leaving three children - Henry C., Niles and Frank W. at home.


THOMAS BRAKEFIELD, farmer, Sec. 15; P. O. Oconomowoc; son of Thomas and Mary Brakefield; was born in County Kent, England, in 1817; in 1830, he emigrated to this country with his parents and settled at Schenectady, N.Y., where they followed farming for awhile, and afterward removed to Utica, N. Y., where his father died; in 1850, he, with his mother, came to Wisconsin and located at Delavan, Walworth Co., where she died in 1854; in 1856, he removed to his present farm, of 160 acres, in the town of Summit. Mr. B. has been a member of the Town Board for six years. He was married in Oneida Co., N. Y., in 1840, to Mary, daughter of Ebenezer and Abbie (Sheldon) Ward, a native of' Herkimer Co., N. Y.; their children are Maria, now the wife of Ezra Feller, and lives at Plainview, Minn.; Edward, now at Rising City, Butler Co., Neb.; Louisa, at home.


ROBERT BRIGHT, farmer, Sec. 8; P. O. Oconomowoc; was born in Herefordshire, England, in 1816; he is the son of William and Catharine Bright, by whom he was brought to America when 2 years old, settling in Madison Co., N. Y.; he subsequently lived in Onondaga, Jefferson, Oswego and St. Lawrence Counties, till the age of 20, with his parents; he followed clerking in hotels in Syracuse, Oswego and other places until 1841, when he was married to Miss Louisa, daughter of Thomas and Netty Allard, a native of Sussex Co., N. Y.; in 1848, they came to Milwaukee, Wis., where he engaged in hotel keeping for a time; he afterward followed lumbering and milling in that place for twenty-seven years; in 1875 he came to the town of Summit, Waukesha Co., and settled on 16O acres, where he now lives; which had been in his possession since 1852; he had three children - Georgiana, died September, 1869, aged 26 years, the wife of George H. Williams, Milwaukee; Louisa, wife of Albert Ward, of New York City, deceased; Adin, a son, now in Milwaukee.


OSGOOD P. CHUBB, farmer, Sec. 10; P. O. Oconomowoc; is a native of Windsor Co., Vt., born in February, 1827. At the age of 10 years, he emigrated with his parents, Newman and Cynthia (Farr) Chubb, to Wisconsin, and located, in December, 1837; on Sec. 36, in the town of Waukesha; six years later, his father sold his farm in Waukesha and removed with his family to the town of Ottawa, where he and his wife afterward died. Osgood P., our present subject, made his home with his father, in the town of Ottawa, till 1851, when he removed to the town of Lomira, Dodge Co., and followed fanning there till 1854; he then went to California, where he engaged in mining for two and a half years, after which. he returned to his family, in the town of Lomira, and continued farming there till October, 1869, when he bought his present farm of 158 1/4 acres, on Sec. 10, town of Summit, Waukesha Co. He was married, in February, 1851, to Lucy, daughter of George M. and Lorena Cobb, a native of Vermont; she came with her parents to Wisconsin in 1836, and located at Oak Creek, Milwaukee Co. Mr. and Mrs. Chubb have had five children - Theodore, deceased; Clarence, now in Clark Co., Wis.; Ernest, deceased, and Lilla and Ernest, at home.


REV. A. S. COLE, D. D., President of the Nashotah House, and Professor of Pastoral Theology; born in Windham Co., Conn., in 1818; his earlier education was in the Plainfield Academy, under the tutorship of John R. Witter, LL. D., a famous teacher of his time; in 1835, he entered Brown Conservatory, of Providence, R. L., and graduated from that institution in 1838, under the care of the Rev, Francis Wayland, D. D.; he graduated from the General Theological Seminary of the Protestant Episcopal Church, New York City, in 1841, in the fall of the same year he became Rector of St. James' Church, Woonsocket, R. I., and, in 1845, Rector of St. Luke's, Kalamazoo, Mich. In December, 1849, he became Rector of St. Luke's, Racine, Wis.; in May, 1850, was elected President of Nashotah House, and Sept. 1 following, he entered upon the duties of that once; in 1851, he was made Professor of Pastoral Theology, in addition to his work as President.


GEORGE COMSTOCK, farmer, Secs. 18 and 19; P. O., Oconomowoc; was born in the town of Woodstock, Windom Co., Conn., in 1812; his father, John Comstock, was a native of Rhode Island, and came to Connecticut, where he died, when his son George was about six years old; his mother, Ruth Sayles, was also a native of Rhode Island, and came, after her marriage, to Connecticut; when George reached his ninth year, he was bound out to a farmer, and made his home with him till he was 15 years old; then was bound out to another, with whom he remained till 22; the following year he spent in Massachusetts, after which he returned to Connecticut, whence, in October, 1825, he went to Buffalo, N. Y., but soon returned again to Connecticut, where, in the spring of 1826, he was married to Eliza, daughter of Daniel Paine, a native of Windham Co; they removed, immediately after marriage, to Oneida Co., N. Y., where he followed farming till 1846, and June 10, of that year, settled in the town of Summit, Waukesha Co., Wis., among its early settlers, locating at that time on his present farm, on Secs. 18 and 19, where he now owns 160 acres. Mr. Comstock has been a member of the Town Board for a number of years. His wife died July 26, 1860, leaving eight children - Mary, now the wife of W. D. Bradford, lives in Minnesota; Emily, now Mrs. L. M. B. Smith, lives in Algona, Iowa; Margaret, now the wife of Samuel Smith, lives in Minnesota; John D., deceased; James, now in Algona, Iowa; Nancy, in Milwaukee; Elizabeth, now Mrs. Don C. Westover, lives in Kansas, and George K., in Milwaukee; his second marriage was May 27, 1869. to Esther A., daughter of Reuben Smith.

Additional Notes sent in by a Dave J. (see lookup page), George Comstock is listed in the book, "The Comstock Family in America", p. 124. His wife, Mary Chandler Paine, is listed in "The Chandler Family", p. 499.

The Comstock ancestry for George can be traced back to the 1500's using the book. I believe it is on the internet in file form (http"//thunder.prohosting.com/~comstock/book/index.html), as well. The book is out of print. I have a copy. (George is not closely related to me, however). Several generations of his descendants are listed as well. Dave is also willing to do lookups in the book.


JAMES M. CRUMMEY, Sec. 35; P. O. Waterville; was born in New York City in 1824; his father, an extensive butcher of that city, kept his son, James M., employed in buying stock for the market. In 1840, the subject of this sketch emigrated to Wisconsin, and located at Milwaukee, where he was employed as ticket agent for a line from Buffalo, via Milwaukee, to Chicago, holding that position for about ten years; he next engaged in the butcher business, but was subsequently employed as ticket agent for the railroads then centering in Milwaukee; the latter part of 1864, he went to Mississippi, and, for two years, was proprietor of a large cotton plantation, near Natchez; returning to Wisconsin, at the end of this time, he settled, with his family, on a farm of 320 acres in the town of Summit, which he had purchased in 1850; here he spent most of his time in farming till 1876, and since that time has been engaged in mining, at Lake City, Colo. He was married in 1850, to Amelia Sexton, of Darien N. Y., who came with her parents to Wisconsin when she was 10 years old; their children are George P., James M. and Bernard A., now residing at home.


MILES N. DODGE, farmer, Sec. 11; P. O. Oconomowoc; is a native of Delaware Co., N. Y.; born in 1813; his father, William Dodge, in Hudson; his mother, Abigail Burgin, was of the old New England stock, born in Connecticut. At the age of 19, Miles N. left his father's home. in Delaware, and went to Genesee Co., where he followed farming till 1846; April 80 of that year, he arrived in he town of Summit, Waukesha Co., as an emigrant to Wisconsin; he with his brother then bought a claim of 220 acres on Secs. 2 and 11 of jame">


JAMES M. BAILEY, farmer, Sec. 8; P.O. Oconomowoc; was born in Addison Co., Vt., in 1808; removed with his parents, Belah and Betsey Baily, to Ticonderoga, Sussex Co., N.Y., when young; here he made his home on a farm until the age of 30, working a portion of the time at the wagonmaker's trade; he went to Plattsburg, Clinton Co., where he followed the carpenter and joiner's trade until 1855; he then emigrated to Wisconsin and located at Summit Corners, and worked at his trade until 1857; he was then appointed Postmaster, which position he held for six months; after which he continued at his trade till 1863, when he was re-appointed Postmaster for a time; after the expiration of this time as Postmaster, he resumed his vocation of carpenter and continued it until 1868, when he moved onto his farm of 80 acres, where he now resides. He was married in Worcester Co., Mass., Jan 15, 1837, to Miss Alice Dwinnel, a native of Oxford; she died in Ticonderoga in 1839, having had two children, one dying April 7, the other the 18th, and she the last day of the same month; his second marriage was Feb. 23, 1842, to Mary Hammond, a native of Ticonderoga; she died in the town of Summit Jan 21, 1858; his third marriage occurred Sept 22, 1858, to Julia Burt, of Montgomery Co., Vt; their children are Mary I., Wm. J., and Charles I. They are members of the M.E. Church.


EDWIN W. BARNARD, farmer, Sec. 15; P. O. Summit; he was born at Hartford, Conn., in 1838; when 4 or 5 years old, he removed with his parents to Albany, N. Y.; whence, in 1845, then came to Waukesha Co., Wis., and located at Waterville, where his father was engaged in merchandising till his death, which occurred April 1, 1857. Edwin, the subject of this sketch, made his home with his mother, at Waterville, till 1862, when, on Dec.,31 of that year, he was married to Emma, a daughter of John D. and Sophia (Brown) McDonald, a native of the town of Summit; they settled, soon after marriage, on Sec. 27, which was their home till 1866, and in the year following he bought his present farm of 160 acres, where he has since resided; they have two daughters - Emma M. and Henrietta R.


ISAAC BENTON, farmer, Sec. 10; P. O., Oconomowoc; was born in Erie Co., Ohio, in 1833; he emigrated, with his parents, Jonas M. and Maria (Furman) Denton, to Wisconsin in 1850, spending the winter in Elkhorn, Walworth Co.; in the spring of 1851, they settled on a farm in the town of Concord, Jefferson Co., Wis.; he made that his home most of the time till 1862, when, in the fall of that year, he enlisted in Co. E, 28th Wis. V. l., and was with his regiment in the army of the West, till mustered out at Brownsville, Texas, in September, 1865; he then returned to his father's home, in Concord, and spent five years, at which time he purchased the homestead, his father then removing to Jefferson. In 1877, he disposed of the above farm and bought his present property, in Sec. 10, in the town of Summit, Waukesha Co. He was married in 1867, to Elizabeth, daughter of Charles and Clarissa Neff, of Waterville, Wis.; their children are Charles and Gertrude.


HENRY BOWRON, farmer, Sec. 23; P. O. Waterville; was born at Champlain, Clinton Co., N. Y., Sept. 1, 1807; his parents, Joseph and Mary (Fox) Bowron, were also natives at Clinton Co.; at the age of 21 years, he began clerking in a dry-goods store at Champlain, working for two different, merchants two years each; he next clerked for a lumber merchant at that place until the fall of 1836, when he landed in Milwaukee as a pioneer of Wisconsin; he spent the winter clearing 15 acres of land at Kilbourn Hill, near Milwaukee; and in the spring of 1837, with his goods in a bandana handkerchief, he started on foot for Waukesha, where he stopped with Cutler, by whose fire he baked his bread for the winter; here he followed the carpenter and joiner's trade and other kinds of business till 1861, when he moved to his present farm of 148 acres, in the town of Summit; he was Assessor of Waukesha for twenty years, and of Summit one year. He was married in Waukesha to Helen Campbell, a native of Vernon, Oneida Co., N. Y., who died Jan. 8, 1879, leaving three children - Henry C., Niles and Frank W. at home.


THOMAS BRAKEFIELD, farmer, Sec. 15; P. O. Oconomowoc; son of Thomas and Mary Brakefield; was born in County Kent, England, in 1817; in 1830, he emigrated to this country with his parents and settled at Schenectady, N.Y., where they followed farming for awhile, and afterward removed to Utica, N. Y., where his father died; in 1850, he, with his mother, came to Wisconsin and located at Delavan, Walworth Co., where she died in 1854; in 1856, he removed to his present farm, of 160 acres, in the town of Summit. Mr. B. has been a member of the Town Board for six years. He was married in Oneida Co., N. Y., in 1840, to Mary, daughter of Ebenezer and Abbie (Sheldon) Ward, a native of' Herkimer Co., N. Y.; their children are Maria, now the wife of Ezra Feller, and lives at Plainview, Minn.; Edward, now at Rising City, Butler Co., Neb.; Louisa, at home.


ROBERT BRIGHT, farmer, Sec. 8; P. O. Oconomowoc; was born in Herefordshire, England, in 1816; he is the son of William and Catharine Bright, by whom he was brought to America when 2 years old, settling in Madison Co., N. Y.; he subsequently lived in Onondaga, Jefferson, Oswego and St. Lawrence Counties, till the age of 20, with his parents; he followed clerking in hotels in Syracuse, Oswego and other places until 1841, when he was married to Miss Louisa, daughter of Thomas and Netty Allard, a native of Sussex Co., N. Y.; in 1848, they came to Milwaukee, Wis., where he engaged in hotel keeping for a time; he afterward followed lumbering and milling in that place for twenty-seven years; in 1875 he came to the town of Summit, Waukesha Co., and settled on 16O acres, where he now lives; which had been in his possession since 1852; he had three children - Georgiana, died September, 1869, aged 26 years, the wife of George H. Williams, Milwaukee; Louisa, wife of Albert Ward, of New York City, deceased; Adin, a son, now in Milwaukee.


OSGOOD P. CHUBB, farmer, Sec. 10; P. O. Oconomowoc; is a native of Windsor Co., Vt., born in February, 1827. At the age of 10 years, he emigrated with his parents, Newman and Cynthia (Farr) Chubb, to Wisconsin, and located, in December, 1837; on Sec. 36, in the town of Waukesha; six years later, his father sold his farm in Waukesha and removed with his family to the town of Ottawa, where he and his wife afterward died. Osgood P., our present subject, made his home with his father, in the town of Ottawa, till 1851, when he removed to the town of Lomira, Dodge Co., and followed fanning there till 1854; he then went to California, where he engaged in mining for two and a half years, after which. he returned to his family, in the town of Lomira, and continued farming there till October, 1869, when he bought his present farm of 158 1/4 acres, on Sec. 10, town of Summit, Waukesha Co. He was married, in February, 1851, to Lucy, daughter of George M. and Lorena Cobb, a native of Vermont; she came with her parents to Wisconsin in 1836, and located at Oak Creek, Milwaukee Co. Mr. and Mrs. Chubb have had five children - Theodore, deceased; Clarence, now in Clark Co., Wis.; Ernest, deceased, and Lilla and Ernest, at home.


REV. A. S. COLE, D. D., President of the Nashotah House, and Professor of Pastoral Theology; born in Windham Co., Conn., in 1818; his earlier education was in the Plainfield Academy, under the tutorship of John R. Witter, LL. D., a famous teacher of his time; in 1835, he entered Brown Conservatory, of Providence, R. L., and graduated from that institution in 1838, under the care of the Rev, Francis Wayland, D. D.; he graduated from the General Theological Seminary of the Protestant Episcopal Church, New York City, in 1841, in the fall of the same year he became Rector of St. James' Church, Woonsocket, R. I., and, in 1845, Rector of St. Luke's, Kalamazoo, Mich. In December, 1849, he became Rector of St. Luke's, Racine, Wis.; in May, 1850, was elected President of Nashotah House, and Sept. 1 following, he entered upon the duties of that once; in 1851, he was made Professor of Pastoral Theology, in addition to his work as President.


GEORGE COMSTOCK, farmer, Secs. 18 and 19; P. O., Oconomowoc; was born in the town of Woodstock, Windom Co., Conn., in 1812; his father, John Comstock, was a native of Rhode Island, and came to Connecticut, where he died, when his son George was about six years old; his mother, Ruth Sayles, was also a native of Rhode Island, and came, after her marriage, to Connecticut; when George reached his ninth year, he was bound out to a farmer, and made his home with him till he was 15 years old; then was bound out to another, with whom he remained till 22; the following year he spent in Massachusetts, after which he returned to Connecticut, whence, in October, 1825, he went to Buffalo, N. Y., but soon returned again to Connecticut, where, in the spring of 1826, he was married to Eliza, daughter of Daniel Paine, a native of Windham Co; they removed, immediately after marriage, to Oneida Co., N. Y., where he followed farming till 1846, and June 10, of that year, settled in the town of Summit, Waukesha Co., Wis., among its early settlers, locating at that time on his present farm, on Secs. 18 and 19, where he now owns 160 acres. Mr. Comstock has been a member of the Town Board for a number of years. His wife died July 26, 1860, leaving eight children - Mary, now the wife of W. D. Bradford, lives in Minnesota; Emily, now Mrs. L. M. B. Smith, lives in Algona, Iowa; Margaret, now the wife of Samuel Smith, lives in Minnesota; John D., deceased; James, now in Algona, Iowa; Nancy, in Milwaukee; Elizabeth, now Mrs. Don C. Westover, lives in Kansas, and George K., in Milwaukee; his second marriage was May 27, 1869. to Esther A., daughter of Reuben Smith.

Additional Notes sent in by a Dave J. (see lookup page), George Comstock is listed in the book, "The Comstock Family in America", p. 124. His wife, Mary Chandler Paine, is listed in "The Chandler Family", p. 499.

The Comstock ancestry for George can be traced back to the 1500's using the book. I believe it is on the internet in file form (http"//thunder.prohosting.com/~comstock/book/index.html), as well. The book is out of print. I have a copy. (George is not closely related to me, however). Several generations of his descendants are listed as well. Dave is also willing to do lookups in the book.


JAMES M. CRUMMEY, Sec. 35; P. O. Waterville; was born in New York City in 1824; his father, an extensive butcher of that city, kept his son, James M., employed in buying stock for the market. In 1840, the subject of this sketch emigrated to Wisconsin, and located at Milwaukee, where he was employed as ticket agent for a line from Buffalo, via Milwaukee, to Chicago, holding that position for about ten years; he next engaged in the butcher business, but was subsequently employed as ticket agent for the railroads then centering in Milwaukee; the latter part of 1864, he went to Mississippi, and, for two years, was proprietor of a large cotton plantation, near Natchez; returning to Wisconsin, at the end of this time, he settled, with his family, on a farm of 320 acres in the town of Summit, which he had purchased in 1850; here he spent most of his time in farming till 1876, and since that time has been engaged in mining, at Lake City, Colo. He was married in 1850, to Amelia Sexton, of Darien N. Y., who came with her parents to Wisconsin when she was 10 years old; their children are George P., James M. and Bernard A., now residing at home.


MILES N. DODGE, farmer, Sec. 11; P. O. Oconomowoc; is a native of Delaware Co., N. Y.; born in 1813; his father, William Dodge, in Hudson; his mother, Abigail Burgin, was of the old New England stock, born in Connecticut. At the age of 19, Miles N. left his father's home. in Delaware, and went to Genesee Co., where he followed farming till 1846; April 80 of that year, he arrived in he town of Summit, Waukesha Co., as an emigrant to Wisconsin; he with his brother then bought a claim of 220 acres on Secs. 2 and 11 of aileyjame">


JAMES M. BAILEY, farmer, Sec. 8; P.O. Oconomowoc; was born in Addison Co., Vt., in 1808; removed with his parents, Belah and Betsey Baily, to Ticonderoga, Sussex Co., N.Y., when young; here he made his home on a farm until the age of 30, working a portion of the time at the wagonmaker's trade; he went to Plattsburg, Clinton Co., where he followed the carpenter and joiner's trade until 1855; he then emigrated to Wisconsin and located at Summit Corners, and worked at his trade until 1857; he was then appointed Postmaster, which position he held for six months; after which he continued at his trade till 1863, when he was re-appointed Postmaster for a time; after the expiration of this time as Postmaster, he resumed his vocation of carpenter and continued it until 1868, when he moved onto his farm of 80 acres, where he now resides. He was married in Worcester Co., Mass., Jan 15, 1837, to Miss Alice Dwinnel, a native of Oxford; she died in Ticonderoga in 1839, having had two children, one dying April 7, the other the 18th, and she the last day of the same month; his second marriage was Feb. 23, 1842, to Mary Hammond, a native of Ticonderoga; she died in the town of Summit Jan 21, 1858; his third marriage occurred Sept 22, 1858, to Julia Burt, of Montgomery Co., Vt; their children are Mary I., Wm. J., and Charles I. They are members of the M.E. Church.


EDWIN W. BARNARD, farmer, Sec. 15; P. O. Summit; he was born at Hartford, Conn., in 1838; when 4 or 5 years old, he removed with his parents to Albany, N. Y.; whence, in 1845, then came to Waukesha Co., Wis., and located at Waterville, where his father was engaged in merchandising till his death, which occurred April 1, 1857. Edwin, the subject of this sketch, made his home with his mother, at Waterville, till 1862, when, on Dec.,31 of that year, he was married to Emma, a daughter of John D. and Sophia (Brown) McDonald, a native of the town of Summit; they settled, soon after marriage, on Sec. 27, which was their home till 1866, and in the year following he bought his present farm of 160 acres, where he has since resided; they have two daughters - Emma M. and Henrietta R.


ISAAC BENTON, farmer, Sec. 10; P. O., Oconomowoc; was born in Erie Co., Ohio, in 1833; he emigrated, with his parents, Jonas M. and Maria (Furman) Denton, to Wisconsin in 1850, spending the winter in Elkhorn, Walworth Co.; in the spring of 1851, they settled on a farm in the town of Concord, Jefferson Co., Wis.; he made that his home most of the time till 1862, when, in the fall of that year, he enlisted in Co. E, 28th Wis. V. l., and was with his regiment in the army of the West, till mustered out at Brownsville, Texas, in September, 1865; he then returned to his father's home, in Concord, and spent five years, at which time he purchased the homestead, his father then removing to Jefferson. In 1877, he disposed of the above farm and bought his present property, in Sec. 10, in the town of Summit, Waukesha Co. He was married in 1867, to Elizabeth, daughter of Charles and Clarissa Neff, of Waterville, Wis.; their children are Charles and Gertrude.


HENRY BOWRON, farmer, Sec. 23; P. O. Waterville; was born at Champlain, Clinton Co., N. Y., Sept. 1, 1807; his parents, Joseph and Mary (Fox) Bowron, were also natives at Clinton Co.; at the age of 21 years, he began clerking in a dry-goods store at Champlain, working for two different, merchants two years each; he next clerked for a lumber merchant at that place until the fall of 1836, when he landed in Milwaukee as a pioneer of Wisconsin; he spent the winter clearing 15 acres of land at Kilbourn Hill, near Milwaukee; and in the spring of 1837, with his goods in a bandana handkerchief, he started on foot for Waukesha, where he stopped with Cutler, by whose fire he baked his bread for the winter; here he followed the carpenter and joiner's trade and other kinds of business till 1861, when he moved to his present farm of 148 acres, in the town of Summit; he was Assessor of Waukesha for twenty years, and of Summit one year. He was married in Waukesha to Helen Campbell, a native of Vernon, Oneida Co., N. Y., who died Jan. 8, 1879, leaving three children - Henry C., Niles and Frank W. at home.


THOMAS BRAKEFIELD, farmer, Sec. 15; P. O. Oconomowoc; son of Thomas and Mary Brakefield; was born in County Kent, England, in 1817; in 1830, he emigrated to this country with his parents and settled at Schenectady, N.Y., where they followed farming for awhile, and afterward removed to Utica, N. Y., where his father died; in 1850, he, with his mother, came to Wisconsin and located at Delavan, Walworth Co., where she died in 1854; in 1856, he removed to his present farm, of 160 acres, in the town of Summit. Mr. B. has been a member of the Town Board for six years. He was married in Oneida Co., N. Y., in 1840, to Mary, daughter of Ebenezer and Abbie (Sheldon) Ward, a native of' Herkimer Co., N. Y.; their children are Maria, now the wife of Ezra Feller, and lives at Plainview, Minn.; Edward, now at Rising City, Butler Co., Neb.; Louisa, at home.


ROBERT BRIGHT, farmer, Sec. 8; P. O. Oconomowoc; was born in Herefordshire, England, in 1816; he is the son of William and Catharine Bright, by whom he was brought to America when 2 years old, settling in Madison Co., N. Y.; he subsequently lived in Onondaga, Jefferson, Oswego and St. Lawrence Counties, till the age of 20, with his parents; he followed clerking in hotels in Syracuse, Oswego and other places until 1841, when he was married to Miss Louisa, daughter of Thomas and Netty Allard, a native of Sussex Co., N. Y.; in 1848, they came to Milwaukee, Wis., where he engaged in hotel keeping for a time; he afterward followed lumbering and milling in that place for twenty-seven years; in 1875 he came to the town of Summit, Waukesha Co., and settled on 16O acres, where he now lives; which had been in his possession since 1852; he had three children - Georgiana, died September, 1869, aged 26 years, the wife of George H. Williams, Milwaukee; Louisa, wife of Albert Ward, of New York City, deceased; Adin, a son, now in Milwaukee.


OSGOOD P. CHUBB, farmer, Sec. 10; P. O. Oconomowoc; is a native of Windsor Co., Vt., born in February, 1827. At the age of 10 years, he emigrated with his parents, Newman and Cynthia (Farr) Chubb, to Wisconsin, and located, in December, 1837; on Sec. 36, in the town of Waukesha; six years later, his father sold his farm in Waukesha and removed with his family to the town of Ottawa, where he and his wife afterward died. Osgood P., our present subject, made his home with his father, in the town of Ottawa, till 1851, when he removed to the town of Lomira, Dodge Co., and followed fanning there till 1854; he then went to California, where he engaged in mining for two and a half years, after which. he returned to his family, in the town of Lomira, and continued farming there till October, 1869, when he bought his present farm of 158 1/4 acres, on Sec. 10, town of Summit, Waukesha Co. He was married, in February, 1851, to Lucy, daughter of George M. and Lorena Cobb, a native of Vermont; she came with her parents to Wisconsin in 1836, and located at Oak Creek, Milwaukee Co. Mr. and Mrs. Chubb have had five children - Theodore, deceased; Clarence, now in Clark Co., Wis.; Ernest, deceased, and Lilla and Ernest, at home.


REV. A. S. COLE, D. D., President of the Nashotah House, and Professor of Pastoral Theology; born in Windham Co., Conn., in 1818; his earlier education was in the Plainfield Academy, under the tutorship of John R. Witter, LL. D., a famous teacher of his time; in 1835, he entered Brown Conservatory, of Providence, R. L., and graduated from that institution in 1838, under the care of the Rev, Francis Wayland, D. D.; he graduated from the General Theological Seminary of the Protestant Episcopal Church, New York City, in 1841, in the fall of the same year he became Rector of St. James' Church, Woonsocket, R. I., and, in 1845, Rector of St. Luke's, Kalamazoo, Mich. In December, 1849, he became Rector of St. Luke's, Racine, Wis.; in May, 1850, was elected President of Nashotah House, and Sept. 1 following, he entered upon the duties of that once; in 1851, he was made Professor of Pastoral Theology, in addition to his work as President.


GEORGE COMSTOCK, farmer, Secs. 18 and 19; P. O., Oconomowoc; was born in the town of Woodstock, Windom Co., Conn., in 1812; his father, John Comstock, was a native of Rhode Island, and came to Connecticut, where he died, when his son George was about six years old; his mother, Ruth Sayles, was also a native of Rhode Island, and came, after her marriage, to Connecticut; when George reached his ninth year, he was bound out to a farmer, and made his home with him till he was 15 years old; then was bound out to another, with whom he remained till 22; the following year he spent in Massachusetts, after which he returned to Connecticut, whence, in October, 1825, he went to Buffalo, N. Y., but soon returned again to Connecticut, where, in the spring of 1826, he was married to Eliza, daughter of Daniel Paine, a native of Windham Co; they removed, immediately after marriage, to Oneida Co., N. Y., where he followed farming till 1846, and June 10, of that year, settled in the town of Summit, Waukesha Co., Wis., among its early settlers, locating at that time on his present farm, on Secs. 18 and 19, where he now owns 160 acres. Mr. Comstock has been a member of the Town Board for a number of years. His wife died July 26, 1860, leaving eight children - Mary, now the wife of W. D. Bradford, lives in Minnesota; Emily, now Mrs. L. M. B. Smith, lives in Algona, Iowa; Margaret, now the wife of Samuel Smith, lives in Minnesota; John D., deceased; James, now in Algona, Iowa; Nancy, in Milwaukee; Elizabeth, now Mrs. Don C. Westover, lives in Kansas, and George K., in Milwaukee; his second marriage was May 27, 1869. to Esther A., daughter of Reuben Smith.

Additional Notes sent in by a Dave J. (see lookup page), George Comstock is listed in the book, "The Comstock Family in America", p. 124. His wife, Mary Chandler Paine, is listed in "The Chandler Family", p. 499.

The Comstock ancestry for George can be traced back to the 1500's using the book. I believe it is on the internet in file form (http"//thunder.prohosting.com/~comstock/book/index.html), as well. The book is out of print. I have a copy. (George is not closely related to me, however). Several generations of his descendants are listed as well. Dave is also willing to do lookups in the book.


JAMES M. CRUMMEY, Sec. 35; P. O. Waterville; was born in New York City in 1824; his father, an extensive butcher of that city, kept his son, James M., employed in buying stock for the market. In 1840, the subject of this sketch emigrated to Wisconsin, and located at Milwaukee, where he was employed as ticket agent for a line from Buffalo, via Milwaukee, to Chicago, holding that position for about ten years; he next engaged in the butcher business, but was subsequently employed as ticket agent for the railroads then centering in Milwaukee; the latter part of 1864, he went to Mississippi, and, for two years, was proprietor of a large cotton plantation, near Natchez; returning to Wisconsin, at the end of this time, he settled, with his family, on a farm of 320 acres in the town of Summit, which he had purchased in 1850; here he spent most of his time in farming till 1876, and since that time has been engaged in mining, at Lake City, Colo. He was married in 1850, to Amelia Sexton, of Darien N. Y., who came with her parents to Wisconsin when she was 10 years old; their children are George P., James M. and Bernard A., now residing at home.


MILES N. DODGE, farmer, Sec. 11; P. O. Oconomowoc; is a native of Delaware Co., N. Y.; born in 1813; his father, William Dodge, in Hudson; his mother, Abigail Burgin, was of the old New England stock, born in Connecticut. At the age of 19, Miles N. left his father's home. in Delaware, and went to Genesee Co., where he followed farming till 1846; April 80 of that year, he arrived in he town of Summit, Waukesha Co., as an emigrant to Wisconsin; he with his brother then bought a claim of 220 acres on Secs. 2 and 11 of that town, which they afterward divided, he taking 80 acres on Sec. 11 and 40 acres on Sec. 2, which has since been his home. Mr. Dodge has been a member of the Town Board for three terms. He was married in Genesee Co., N. Y.. in 1840, to Emily K., daughter of Elisha and Phila (Billings) Holdridge, a native of Herkimer Co., N. Y.; their children are Marshall. now at Canby, Minn.; Eugene H., now in La-qui-parle Co., Minn.; Helen P., at home, and George A., deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Dodge are connected with the Congregational Church.


REV. JOHN H. EGAR. D. D., professor of Ecclesiastical History, Nashotah House, was born in Cambridgeshire, Eng., in 1832; came with his parents to America in 1846, and to Milwaukee in the spring of 1847; he was there employed in the Sentinel and Wisconsin offices till 1852, when he entered the Nashotah House as a student of theology, and graduated from the same in 1856; he was subsequently rector of the church at Prairie du Chien, Waukesha and Beloit, Wis., Galena, Ill., Leavenworth, Kan., and St. Peter's, Pittsburg; while rector of St. Peter's he published a book entitled "The Three Graces of the Holy Trinity," and has also written several small pamphlets, among them, "The Doctrine of the Trinity Defended;" in January, 1872, he returned to Nashotah to accept the professorship of ecclesiastical history, in which position he has since been retained.


MARSHALL FAIRSERVICE, deceased; born in Boston; removed early in life to the State of New York, and settled near Rome, in Oneida Co., where he followed farming till 1837; he then emigrated to Wisconsin, and settled in the town of Summit, near the lower Nehumabin Lake, where he devoted his time to agricultural pursuits till the time of his death; he was married to Mariba Fisk, a native of Massachusetts, and the fruits of this marriage were five daughters, namely, Frances, now Mrs. Leavett, and Harriet E., now Mrs. Parks, both of the town of Summit; Agnes, now Mrs. Orson Reed, formerly of the same town; Caroline, now Mrs. Albert Allen, of Delafield; and Mary, now Mrs. Richard Lush, formerly of Summit.


CHARLES H. FLINTON, farmer, Secs. 4 and 5; P. O. Oconomowoc; was born in Lincolnshire, Eng., in 1830, and came to Waukesha Co., Wis., in 1854, locating in the town of Summit; he began working for farmers in this locality soon after his arrival, and made this town his home till 1863, when he removed to Colorado, and there followed farming till 1876, when he returned to Summit. He was married in 1860 to Harriet E., daughter of Richard and Jane Hardell, a native of Lincolnshire, Eng., but came with her parents to Summit in 1837.


MICHAEL GELSHER, farmer, Secs. 5 and 6; P. O. Oconomowoc; was born in County Meath, Ireland, in 1820. When 21 years of age, he emigrated to America, and stopped in Sussex Co., N. J., where he worked in an iron blast-furnace for N. Brooks for eleven years; In the spring of 1851, he moved to the town of Ixonia, Jefferson Co., Wis., having been out there the year before and bought a farm of 40 acres; he made his home there till 1873, when he sold his farm, which he had increased to 120 acres, and removed to the city of Oconomowoc; three years later he purchased his present farm of 132 acres, situated on Secs. 5 and 6, in the town of Summit. He was married in 1846, to Mary Greene, the ceremony being performed on board the vessel during their voyage to America; they adopted a daughter, Catharine, who is now the wife of Henry Dougherty, who lives at Dubuque, Iowa.


REV. JOHN F. GIBBS, is a native of Otsego Co., N. Y.; his father, Daniel Gibbs, was born in the town of Litchfield, Conn., about 1767, and at the age of 16 (his family being broken up during the Revolutionary war) he went into Vermont; some years after, with others, he went thence to the Genesee country in New York, where he, with them, cleared up a farm near what was known as Waskey Flats, for one Seth Price, who afterward offered him 80 acres of land where the city of Rochester now stands, as payment for his services, but which he declined to accept; he then went into Herkimer Co., N. Y., where he afterward married Magdalena Lighthall, a lady of German descent; they had a family of ten children, three of whom died when young; John F., the youngest, was born in Otsego Co., N. Y., May 10, 1820; he spent the first years of his life in Otsego, Genesee, and St. Lawrence Cos., and then located in the village of Theresa, Jefferson Co.; here he engaged in farming for a time; also owned and run a boat on the Erie canal from Buffalo to Albany, which he continued to do until 1848, when he engaged in merchandising there till 1852; closing out his business, he then removed to Wisconsin, and located on a farm in the town of Le Roy, Dodge Co., which was afterward his home till 1874, when he removed to his present farm on Sec. 5, town of Summit, part of which lies within the city limits of Oconomowoc. He united with the M. E. Church in 1860; began at once the study and work of the ministry as an exhorter at Iron Ridge, Dodge Co.; was licenses in April, 1861, and continued the work, under the regular pastor, as local preacher; was ordained Deacon, October 1868; was ordained Elder at Whitewater, Wis., in October, 1873; continued his work in Dodge County till 1874, when he removed to Oconomowoc; he has since continued the work of holding services on alternate Sundays at Cobb Schoolhouse, Summit, Waukesha Co., Concord, Jefferson Co., and occasionally holding service, as supply, in Oconomowoc, having traveled over 18,000 miles, preaching a free gospel. He was married in Jefferson County, N. Y., to Mary Hawkins, a native of that county who died in Dodge Co., Wis., Jan. 5, 1866, leaving four children-William F., at Hustisford, Dodge Co.; Mary A., now the wife of Alanson Bacon, and lives at Middleburgh, Neb.; Ellen M., now Mrs. Geo. W. Cowls, lives in Richardson Co., Neb.; Chloe E., now the wife of Allen A. Billings, now of Oconomowoc. The second marriage was on July 5, 1866, to Adelia M. Crossman, a native of Jefferson, N. Y., their children are George L., Jennie I. and John W., who are now at home.


A. GIFFORD GURNEY, farmer, Sec. 14; P. O. Delafield; was born in Duchess Co., N. Y., in 1809; his father, David Gurney, was also a native of that county, and followed farming for a livelihood. Our subject, A. G., spent his time at the same vocation till 1836, when he began business for himself, and followed teaching and farming till 1846; he then emigrated to Wisconsin and located on his present farm, where he now owns 80 acres. He was married in January, 1846, to Susan, a daughter of Judge Henry Livingston, of Poughkeepsie, N. Y.; they have had two children-Edwin L., deceased, and Jennie L., at home.


ABRAM G. HARDELL, farmer and stock-raiser; Secs. 33 and 34; P. O. Golden Lake; was born in Yorkshire, Engl., in 1826; his parents, Richard and Jane Hardell, were natives of Lincolnshire, Eng., and when their son, Abram G., was about 2 years old, they sailed for America; in the following year they removed to Utica, N. Y., and later still to Clinton of the same State; in 1836 they arrived at Milwaukee, and in 1837 settled in the town of Summit. Our subject made his home with his parents till his marriage, which occurred July 3, 1854, to Mary, a daughter of Robert and Mary Wilkinson, of the town of Mukwonago, Waukesha Co.; he has ever since continued to reside on the homestead, and he now owns a farm of about 500 acres in the same town. Mr. H. devotes much of his time to breeding short-horn cattle and Spanish Merino sheep. He has been member and Chairman of the Town Board, and has held other and minor offices in his town.


W. J. HARDELL, farmer, Secs. 26 and 27; P. O. Summit; was born in Lincolnshire, Eng., and emigrated to America with his parents, Richard and Jane Hardell, when he was but 4 or 5 years old; landing in New York, they stopped there nearly a year, where his father followed the business of a contractor and builder; later they removed to Clinton, N. Y., whence, in 1836, they came to Wisconsin and landed in Milwaukee; here they remained till May, 1837, when the subject of this sketch, with a team, came by the way of Waukesha, then Prairieville, to the town of Summit, being the first wagon that came from Waukesha to Summit; his father having preceded him and made a claim to a section of land in sections numbered 28, 33 and 34, he joined him at the above-mentioned place, where they at once began to make preparation for the family, which arrived some weeks after; during the first year they realized many of the hardships and privations of pioneer life, but, with that perseverance which characterizes the first settlers of this country, they managed to provide themselves with food enough till the soil could supply them with a crop. After making his home in this town for 11 years, Mr. H. removed, in 1848, to LaSalle Co., Ill., where he continued farming most of the time till 1863, excepting that in each of the years 1849 and 1853 he made a trip to California; in the first of these he remained five months, and the second, three years; in 1863 he returned to the town of Summit and settled on his present farm of 160 acres. He was married in 1848 to Permelia Tyler, a native of Madison County, and an emigrant to Wisconsin in 1847; they have four children-George B., who is now in O'Brien County, Iowa; Frank, in Nebraska; Richard H., at home; Addie, now the wife of F. Alger, lives in Oconomowoc.


JOHN CHRISTIAN FREDERICK HARTMANN, farmer, Sec. 6; P. O. Oconomowoc; was born in Prussia in 1836, and came with his parents to Wisconsin in 1844; they settled on a farm of 160 acres, in the town of Ixonia, Jefferson Co., which his father entered from the Government, and afterward bought more, till he had quite an extensive farm at the time of his death, which occurred in 1874. John C. F. made his home in Ixonia a year after the death of his father; then removed to the city of Oconomowoc, where he engaged in selling farm machinery for two years; he removed to his present farm of 103 acres in 1878; in May, 1879, he formed a copartnership in the Oconomowoc foundry and machine shop, under the firm of Hartmann, Hubner & Co., of which firm he is now a member. He was married, Sept. 8, 1864, to Miss Louisa, daughter of William and Sophia Waltmann, a native of the town of Lebanon, Dodge Co., Wis., who died Aug. 7, 1874, leaving six children, as follows, William F. L., Louis A., Alexander E., Agnes A., Louisa A., A. Edward. His second marriage was, Dec. 13, 1874, to Miss Mary Waltmann, a sister to his first wife, by whom he has had three children-Fredereck B., Celia M., John F., deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Hartmann are members of the Lutheran Church.


B. C. HILDRETH, farmer, Secs. 17 and 20; P. O. Summit; was born in New Hampshire in 1811, and at the age of 6 or 7 years, he removed with his parents, Jesse and Betsey (Cobb) Hildreth, to Oneida Co., N. Y., where he followed farming until 1837. He was married there, in 1835, to Priscilla Preston, with whom and his father's family, in the fall of 1837, he emigrated to Wisconsin and settled in the town of Summit, Waukesha Co., his father and brother having preceded them some months and made claims on Secs. 17 and 20 of this town; the house for the family was not yet completed when they arrived, but they found shelter in a shanty on Mr. Baxter's farm till December, when they removed to their new home; he and his father found work at chopping logs near Waukesha during the winter months, by which they provided their families with bread, and in the spring of 1838, he sowed the first wheat in this town; his father died on the homestead in 1852, his mother died in Adams Co., Wis., in 1842. B. C., soon after their permanent settlement, put up a log house on the homestead, which sufficed for a home till 1857, when his present edifice was erected; his wife died June 12, 1841, leaving three children, having had four-Jane, the late wife of Edward Henry, now deceased, Hamilton, who died Nov. 9, 1837 (the first death in the town), Helen, now the wife of William Potter, and lives in Bates Co., Mo.; his second marriage was June 9, 1842, to Priscilla Labar, a native of Tompkins Co., N. Y.; they have two sons-Charles O., now in Saline Co., Neb.; Henry H., who married Jeannette Kimball and has five children-Edna M., Ida M., Nellie, Bertram C. and Maria M. Mr. Hildreth has been a member of the Town Board three or four terms, Assessor four years, Town Treasurer two years.-->


B. R. HINKLEY, retired, Summit Corners; P. O. Oconomowoc; was born in the town of Weston, Oneida Co., N. Y., Jan. 13, 1809. His father, Amasa Hinkley, was born in Connecticut, and went to Oneida Co., N. Y., in 1795. The subject of this sketch spent his early life at farming, working by the month at that occupation for three years; in 1831, he began peddling Yankee notions through Northern New York and Canada, at which he continued three years; he then returned to Oneida Co., purchased a team and began trading between Uties and Canada, buying dried-apples at one place and disposing of them at the other, returning with his wagon loaded with grass seed, etc., from the sale of which he realized handsome profits; after spending a winter in this way, he was employed by a Quaker to buy cattle in Oneida and other counties; after continuing in this employment for a year, he was then made a partner in the business, and at the death of the old man, formed a co-partnership with his son, and in the panic of 1837, lost all he had; he never, however, failed to keep his credit good, and his friends again supplied him with capital to continue his business, which he did with meager success; in December, 1843, with Dr. Edwards, a buggy and two horses, he left Rome to try his fortune in the West, and arrived in March, 1844, in the town of Summit, Waukesha Co., Wis.; here he rented of A. Sweet, of Milwaukee, a farm of 800 acres on Secs. 34 and 35, of this town, at $400 a year, the rent to be paid in improvements on the farm; he then returned to New York and borrowed $500 to carry on the business of farming, which he died successfully for three years, when he bought a farm of 160 acres on Sec. 14, of Summit, and after farming there for a number of years, he sold that and bought a half of Sec. 10, of the same town; here he followed farming, trading and dealing in real estate for several years; afterward he disposed of his farm, and has since been engaged in loaning money; in 1860, he, with others, chartered the Bank of Oconomowoc, of which he was elected Vice-President and afterward President, holding the latter position until the bank changed hands; Mr. Hinkley has been Overseer of Public Highways thirty-four out of his thirty-six years' residence in the town of Summit, and has cone much in shaping and improving the drives of the same; he was appointed by Gov. Fairchild a member of the Board of Regents of the State University, and was a member of that body for a number of years; he was a member of the Committee on Location of the State Experimental Farm; he was instrumental in the re-organization of the State University; was re-appointed to the Board of Regents by Gov. Washburne; he was President of the State Agricultural Society for nine successive years, and declined further nomination; he was one of the first Directors of the Madison Mutual Insurance Co., and remained a member of that Board for ten or fifteen years. He was married in March, 1838, to Harriet Hovey, of Oneida Co., N. Y., who died in the town of Summit, in November, 1852, leaving three children-Mary, now the wife of Richard Humphrey, and lives at Nashotah; Helen, now Mrs. Lloyd Breck, of Barrytown, N. Y.; and Henry R., who died in Chicago, in 1876. His second marriage was in 1853, to Jeannette Townsend, a native of Attica, N. Y., who died in February, 1871; his third marriage was to Mrs. Bessie Norcott Blinn, of Indianapolis, Aug. 2, 1871.


REV. LEWIS A. KEMPER, D. D., Professor of Exegesis, Biblical Literature and Hebrew; was born in Philadelphia, Penn., in 1829; he graduated from Columbia College, New York City, in 1849, and came to Wisconsin the same summer as a theological student of the Nashotah House, where he has since remained as student, tutor and professor; he has been Rector of St. Paul's Church, Ashippun, Wis., since 1853.


A. J. KIDDER, farmer, Sec. 21; P. O. Summit; was born in Windsor Co., Vt., Jan. 1, 1826; he emigrated to Wisconsin in 1845, landing in Kenosha, then Southport, with only 35 cents; he at once began work for farmers at $10 per month, which he continued in the vicinity till 1847, when he went to Dodge County and made his home with his father's family, spending the winter, however, in the pineries; in December, 1849, he with his brother started by water, crossing the isthmus, and sailing up the Pacific to California, where he engaged in mining till the spring of 1853; returning then to the town of Lomira, Dodge Co., Wis., he traded for a farm of 200 acres in that town, by giving in exchange 160 acres in Brown County. In February, 1854, he returned to California and spent thirteen years there in mining and teaming, and in the spring of 1863 he went to Idaho, followed mining and gardening till 1867, when he came again to Dodge County, and there he followed farming till 1874; he then purchased his present farm of 60 acres, in the town of Summit, Waukesha Co. He was married in June, 1870, to Sarah A. Vangilder, a native of New York; their children are Burr, Albert, Alice, Joseph and Warren.


SAMUEL C. LEAVITT (deceased), was born in Oneida Co., N. Y., in 1800; his parents, Roger and Lydia Leavitt, were natives of Connecticut, and removed as early settlers to Oneida Co., N. Y.; our present subject spent most of his early life at farming in his native county. He was married there in 1834 to Frances, a daughter of Marshall H. and Mariba (Fiske) Fairservice, a native of the town of Weston, Oneida Co., N. Y., and was born in 1810. In November, 1837, they arrived at Milwaukee, as emigrants to Wisconsin, and about two weeks later they reached the town of Summit, Waukesha Co., spent the winter on the Edgerton farm, and in the spring of 1838 settled on Sec. 22, where he made his claim to 200 acres; he at once built his log house, which sufficed for a home for several years, and which gave place to the present comfortable residence. Mr. Leavitt devoted his time wholly to agricultural pursuits, never seeking an office, but, nevertheless, was called upon, and complied in filling some of the minor ones of his town. He died in January, 1872, leaving six children, having had seven, as follows, Charles H. and Marshall H., children by his first wife, Mary A. Kilbourn, of Oneida Co., N. Y., whom he married in 1826, and who died in 1831; Charles in now in California, and Marshall H. died at Washington, April 6, 1865, from the effects of a wound received at the battle of Petersburg in March previous; from the second marriage the children are as follows, James M., now at Sioux Falls, Dak.; Adelia, at home; Samuel F., at Sioux Falls; Theodore F., Ella F., now the wife of J. F. Redfield, also at Sioux Falls.


JOHN D. McDONALD, farmer, Sec. 21; P. O. Summit Center. This pioneer of Summit was born in Fulton Co., N. Y., in 1816; his father, Daniel McDonald, was a native of Edinburgh, Scotland and died when his son was 12 years old; his mother, Mary Elizabeth Port, was born in Ireland, and died, when he was about 5 years of age; upon the death of his father, being left the oldest of three orphan children, and with scarcely any means of support, save that earned by his own hands, he spent his time at farm work till he arrived at the age of 16, when he was apprenticed to the glove and mitten trade, at Gloversville, N. Y., where he remained till of age; in November, 1836, he emigrated to the Territory of Wisconsin, spent the winter in Milwaukee, and in March, 1837, westward still he bent to his course, till he arrived at the town of Summit, Waukesha (then Milwaukee) County, where he selected his site, and on the 7th day of April following, he entered his claim to 40 acres in Sec. 21; he at once began to improve his farm, as rapidly as limited means would permit, and built his pioneer shanty, which has since been exchanged for his present commodious farm-residence; his farm of 40 acres has grown into one of several hundred acres, which yields its annual rich harvests. Mr. McDonald has held office of Chairman of the Town Board for eight or nine years, Chairman of the County Board for three or four years, was elected a member of the Wisconsin Legislature from his Assembly District of Waukesha County, in 1869, and served with such satisfaction to his constituency, that he was re-elected as a member of that body in 1870; he has also served in minor offices, and taken an active part in the affairs of the town. He was married in 1840 to Miss Sophia, daughter of Gardner and Ruey (Plumley) Brown, a native of St. Lawrence Co., N. Y.; she came with her parents to Summit in 1837, where they afterward died. Mr. and Mrs. McDonald have reared a family of six children-Mary, now the wife of C. M. Story, and lives at Red Cloud, Neb.; Emma E., now Mrs. E. W. Barnard, and now lives in Summit; Daniel, John, Maggie, and Nellie at home.


HENRY C. McDOWELL, proprietor of the Summit Stock Farm, Secs. 10 and 11; P. O. Oconomowoc; was born in Ontario Co., N. Y., in 1826; he removed with his parents, David and Harriet McDowell, to Cuyahoga Co., Ohio, when quite young; there his father entered and improved a farm, and carried on farming, merchandising, distilling, milling, etc., for many years. Our present subject made his home with his father until 1849, when he began the lake transportation business, which he followed for twenty-five years, conducting also a farm during the time; in 1873, he purchased what was then known as the J. J. Tallmadge farm, where he now owns 310 acres and where he has since followed farming and stock-raising. He was married, in 1854, to Jennie E., daughter of Isaac and Jane Sherman,of Bridgeport, Conn., who died in 1870, leaving two children-Wenonah S., now the wife of Charles Hecker, and lives in Cleveland, Ohio, and William S., who lives with his father; his second marriage was to Viola S., daughter of Dr. Turner, of Cleveland, Ohio, in 1873.


CURTIS MANN, farmer, Sec. 3; P. O. Oconomowoc; was born in Washington Co., N. Y., in 1815; he engaged in canal transportation in his native county for a number of years, and in 1846, removed to Buffalo, where he engaged in grain trade and lake transportation till 1858; he then came to Wisconsin, to the town of Summit, Waukesha Co., having removed his family here in 1856, he himself remaining at Buffalo two years, to close up his business. He was a member of the Board of Trade in Milwaukee from 1858 till 1875, since which time he has been engaged chiefly in lumbering in Marathon Co.; he was elected a member of the State Senate of Wisconsin, from Waukesha Co., in 1868. He was married in Washington Co., N. Y., in 1852, to Nancy Comstock, a native of that county; their children are Fanny, Frank, William E. and Orville K.


LEVI P. MERICKLE, farmer, Secs. 27 and 28; P. O. Summit Center; was born in the town of Lobo, Canada West, in 1815; he spent much of his early life on a farm in Canada till 1836, when he came to the State of Michigan, and spent the winter; in June, 1836, he came to the town of Summit, Waukesha Co., Wis., and worked for Mr. Dousman one and a half years, then made a squatter's claim to the farm on which he now lives; his mother dying Oct. 8, 1835, his father and other members of the family joined him in Summit, in 1839, and made that their home till 1846, whence they removed to Dodge Co., where he died in 1870. Mr. L. P. Merickle was married in Summit, May 10, 1840, to Miss Phebe J., daughter of Richard and Jane Hardell, a native of Lincolnshire, Eng., born in 1819; they made their home on the farm in Summit till 1861, then removed to Dodge Co., whence, in 1863, they went to Blue Earth Co., Minn., where he continued farming till 1880; in January of that year, he returned to the old farm in Summit; their children are Elen A., now the wife of B. T. Ellis, and lives in McHenry Co., Ill.; Josephine E., now Mrs. George Webster, and lives in Lac-qui-Parle Co., Minn.; William W., who married Sarah Youngs, and lives in Blue Earth Co., Minn.; Abbie J., now the wife of William Youngs, of Blue Earth Co., Minn.; Anna J. and Emma W., at home. Mr. and Mrs. M. are members of the Seventh Day Advent Church.


ELISHA MORRIS, farmer, Sec. 7; P. O. Oconomowoc; was born in Madison Co., N. Y., June 6, 1817; his father, Mathias Morris, was a native of New York, and his mother, Sarah Lathrop, was a native of Connecticut; in June, 1837, the family emigrated to Wisconsin, and were the first, as a family, to locate in the town of Oconomowoc, his mother and sisters being the first women in that town. His father making his home here for about fifteen years, removed to Winnebago Co., where he afterward died. Elisha, our subject, removed four years later to Sec. 4, town of Summit, where he lived nearly two years, and then removed to his present home, on Sec. 7, where he now owns 50 acres; he enlisted, in 1861, in Co. H., 1st W. V. C., under Col. Daniels, and was with his regiment in the Army of the Tennessee and South until February, 1865, when he was mustered out of service at Nashville, Tenn.; he then returned to his home in Summit, and has since followed farming. He was married in 1842, to Martha, daughter of Eleazer and Susan Scripture, a native of New York, who died about 1847, leaving two children-Eugene, now in Harper Co., Kan.; Imogene, now the wife of James Chapin, of Chicago; his second marriage was to Mary Harmon, widow of Benjamin Harmon, and daughter of Hiram and Sarah Howard, a native of Vermont; they have two children-Byron, now in Chicago, and Alice, at home.


ANNIS NELSON, farmer, Sec. 30; P. O. Golden Lake; was born in Norway in 1835, and came with his parents, Nels and Tullena Nelson, to Waukesha Co., Wis.; they were the second settlers in that part of the town of Summit; arriving in July, 1843, they slept out doors till a pen of ironwood poles was substituted for a house, in December; their first house was logs, and built on the Norwegian plan, which was their home for a year or two, when their present home was erected; his father died here in 1871; his mother in April, 1879, leaving four sons-Annis, our subject, who now owns 100 acres in this town and in Jefferson Co.; Marshall and Louis in Oconomowoc, and Morten in California. CAPT. THOMAS L. PARKER, was born in the county of Kent, England, 1814; at the age of 13 years, he began spending his vacations at sea, and by the time he reached his 16th year, he had visited the Azores and other Western Islands; when 16, he sailed up the Mediterranean on a two-year's voyage, visiting Greece, Turkey and other European countries; leaving his native country in the autumn of 1832, he sailed for America, and in the spring of 1834 went to Oswego, N. Y., where he was master of a vessel till 1841; removing then to Chicago, where he actively engaged in grain, warehouse and lake marine for many years; coming to this city in August, 1874, on a visit, and finding the property which he now owns, about three miles east from the city, on Oconomowoc Lake, for sale, he purchased it about three months later, and now has one of the finest estates, if not the first, in Wisconsin.


JACOB REGULA, farmer, Sec. 14; P. O. Summit; was born in the Rhine Province. in Bavaria, in 1806; he began the wagon-maker's trade at the age of 16, and continued at this till 1832. He was married in 1831, to Philippine Voos, with whom, July, 1882, he sailed for America, landing at New York in August following, and soon after settled at Rome, Oneida Co.; here he continued his trade till 1838, when, September 1, of that year, he arrived in Milwaukee; leaving his wife at the last-mentioned place he proceeded to Summit, Waukesha Co., to find some friends who had gone before; while here he purchased a claim, being the southwest, quarter of Sec. 14, and made improvements for his future home; here he plied his trade for several years in connection with that of farming; be made the cradle that cut the first, wheat in the town of Summit; he made the first well-buckets that were made in the town, and the coffin for the second burial that took place in Summit. Of later years he has devoted his time to farming. They have had children as follows, namely, Nicholas, Lovina and Lena deceased; Elizabeth, now the wife of Charles Churchill; Harriet, the late wife of Martin Coon, of Monroe Co., now deceased; Lovina, wife of Theodore Hines, and lives in Nebraska; Eliza, wife of Frank Standard, and lives in Nebraska; Jennie, now.Mrs. Joseph Severling, and lives in Iowa; Jacob, now married and at home; Charles at home.


BENJAMIN RISING, farmer, Secs. 23 and 24; P. O. Delafield; was born in Hampshire Co., Mass., in 1840; came to Milwaukee in 1860, and there engaged in the wholesale drug business till 1875, when he disposed of that, and bought his present farm of 145 acres, in the town of Summit. He was married at Berlin, Wis., to Lucy L. Ward, a native of Ohio; their children are Benjamin, Grace, Arthur and Jessie.


ERNEST SCHWARGER, farmer, Sec. 31; P. O. Golden Lake; was born in Prussia in 1820; he emigrated to America in 1853, and located in Milwaukee, Wis., whence, in April, 1854, he settled on his present farm of 101 acres, in the town of Summit, Waukesha Co. Mr. S. was appointed Postmaster by President Johnson, in November, 1865, and has been retained in that office at Golden Lake since that time. He was married in Prussia, in 1848, to Amelia Engelmann; their children are Frank, who married Bagena Hauson, a native of Wisconsin - they now live on Sec. 31, Amelia; Mina, the late Mrs. Michael Andrews, is dead.


FREDERICK SHEARSMITH, farmer. Sec. 24; P. O. Delafield; was born in Prussia in 1823, came to America in 1853, and stopped a short time in Milwaukee, when he came to the town of Summit, where he worked one and a half years for Mrs. Wieman; he then went to the town of Sullivan, Jefferson Co., where he made his home till 1867, and after this returned to Summit, and located on his present farm of 87 acres. He was married in February, 1856, to Elizabeth Poller, a native of Prussia; their children are John, Frank, Annie, William, Louisa, Emma, Eddie and Mary Jane, who at this time reside with their parents.


SIDNEY F. SHEPARD, farmer, Sec. 29; P. O. Golden Lake; is a native of Rensselaer Co., N. Y.; born in 1821; he spent his time with his parents, Charles and Mercy Shepard, till 1842, when, in the autumn of that year, he emigrated to Wisconsin, and located in the town of Lagrange, Walworth Co., there he spent five years at the carpenter and joiner's trade. He was married in the town of Vernon, Waukesha Co., Feb. 1. 1849, to Hannah, daughter of Asher and Jane Stillwell, who was a native of New Jersey, and came with her parents to Waukesha, Wis., in 1839, where her father afterward died; her mother now lives in Kilbourn City. Soon after marriage, Mr. and Mrs. Shepard settled in the town of Vernon, where he followed farming till the spring of 1872, when he removed to his present farm of 200 acres in the town of Summit. Mrs. Shepard died Dec. 15, 1865, leaving five children, having had six - Elliot W., who died at the age of 10 years; Isadora J., now Mrs. William Boundy, and lives in Oconomowoc; Theron, now in Iowa.; Elmore, Sidney L. and Florence M. are at home. His second marriage was June 15, 1866. to Armatha, daughter of William and Catharine Stillwell, a cousin to his first wife; their children are Ada H., Myra M., Eva A., Catharine F. and Charles.


HENRY STOHMANN, proprietor of the Golden Lake House; was born in Hanover in 1813; he emigrated to America in 1840, and spent two years as coachman in New York City; he then came to Waukesha Co., Wis, and located on Sec. 28, town of Summit, where he engaged in farming till 1874; he then became proprietor of the Golden Lake House, which he has since managed. He was married in New York City, in 1842, to Mary Berns, a native of England, who died in 1870; his second marriage was to Miss Catharine Meyer; a native of Germany, she having one son, Henry Meyer, now in Nebraska.


CAPT. E. S. STONE, Secs. 9 and 16; P. O. Oconomowoc; is a native of Wayne Co., N. Y., born in 1825; his parents, Hinman and Mary (Stevens) Stone, were natives of Connecticut, and removed soon after their marriage as early settlers to Wayne Co., N. Y. Our subject spent the first fourteen years of his life with his father on the farm, and then began sailing on Lake Ontario, which he continued during two summers; in Sept., 1842, he landed in Milwaukee, then a lad of 17 years, to seek his fortune in the wilds of Wisconsin; with his wardrobe carefully done up in a bandana handkerchief, he came on foot to the town of Brookfield, Waukesha Co., where he found employment with Jacob Suttin at rail-making; during his stay at this place he made a claim, but by reason of his minority he was unable to hold it. In the spring of 1843 he returned to Milwaukee and began sailing with Capt. Calvin Ripley, whose vessel was engaged in the lumber trade between Milwaukee and Manistee, Mich., which he followed for two seasons; with the first fifty dollars he earned he bought 40 acres of land in the town of Brookfield and built a house on it; he afterward sold the above and bought the farm of Capt. Ripley in the town of Greenfield, Milwaukee Co., though at this period he spent most of his time on the lakes; in 1853 he removed to Milwaukee, where, wtill being interested in sailing, he was one of the first members of the Board of Trade, and has ever since been connected with that body; in 1857 he bought his present farm, "Cedar Beach," of 160 acres, on Secs. 9 and 16 on the east bank of Silver Lake, town of Summit, which has been the home of his family. Capt. Stone has been a member of the Town Baord for three terms; a member of the Wisconsin Assembly in 1873 from his district in Waukesha Co. He was married in 1852 to Nancy, daughter of Deacon George McWhorter, a native of Salem, N. Y., who emigrated to Wisconsin with her parents in 1836; their children are Percy F., a commission merchant in Milwaukee; Ella, now the wife of Theodore F. Leavitt, lives at Sioux Falls, D. T.; Jennie L., at home; F. Paul, in railroad business in Milwaukee; Louis J. and Alice, now at home.


G. W. VAN BRUNT, farmer, Sec. 34; stock-raiser and proprietor of the Springdale Summer Resort; P. O. Waterville; was born in St. Lawrence Co., N. Y., in July, 1830, and with his parents immigrated to Wisconsin in May, 1846. They located on a farm in the town of Burnett, Dodge Co., where our subject followed farming till 1861; he then removed to Horicon, where he was engaged in the manufacture of the Van Brunt Seeder, of which he was the inventor and patentee; in 1870, he sold out his interest in the Seeder works, and in 1873 bought his present farm of 320 acres. He was married in Jefferson Co., N. Y., in 1853, to Miss Jane Head; they have two children, Elvie, now Mrs. E. V. Beals, of Milwaukee, and Charles B., who is now married and lives on the farm with his father.


GEO. H. WATKINS, farmer, Secs. 8 and 9; P. O. Oconomowoc; is a native of Philadelphia; was born in 1840; he came with his father, William Watkins, to Milwaukee in 1855, and was there engaged in the manufacture of brick from 1869 till August 1878, when he purchased the Highland farm of 80 acres, on Secs. 8 and 9, town of Summit, Waukesha Co., and has since engaged in farming. He was married in Milwaukee, in 1876, to Miss Jessie, daughter of John Roberts, of that city.


DR. L. W. WEEKS, farmer, Sec. 10; P. O. Oconomowoc; was born in Caledonia Co., Vt., in 1805; his father, Lemuel Weeks, was a native of Massachusetts, and removed to Hardwick, Caledonia Co., Vt., in 1802, and followed farming till his death; his mother, Fannie Wheeler, was also a native of Massachusetts, and was connected with a family that was prominent in the Revolutionary war; the Dr. received an academic education, after which he took up the study of medicine and graduated from the Medical Academy of Castleton, Rutland Co., Vt., in 1828; he immediately entered upon the practice of his profession at Ticonderoga, N. Y.; a year later he removed to Keysville, N. Y., and continued the practice of medicine till 1836; in June of that year he arrived in Milwaukee, then a small hamlet, and where he afterward made his home till 1875. In 1838 or 1839, he was appointed deputy U. S. Marshal at that place, in which position he was retained for several years; he was one of the Rock River Canal Commssioners in 1838-39; was a member of the City Council of Milwaukee for many years, serving several terms as President of the same body. In July, 1836, he, in company with a party, came on foot through this part of the country, going to Hustisford, Dodge Co., looking for a fall in Rock River. Thence they went to Madison, and while there he entered 1,000 acres of land in Dane Co.; he returned then to Milwaukee, and afterward became one of the most extensive dealers in real estate in that city; in 1875, he bought his present farm of 50 acres in Sec. 10, town of Summit, Waukesha Co., where he has since engaged in breeding the Jersey stock. He was married in Montpelier, Vt., in 1829, to Mary, daughter of Ephraim and Mary (Bradbury) Sands, a native of Maine; their children are Horace S., now merchant in New York City, and Mary, now the wife of George Jones, of Pine Lake, Waukesha Co.


DANIEL WILLIAMS, farmer, Sec. 27; P. O. Summit; born in the town of Exeter, Otsego Co., N. Y., June 22, 1829. His father, Sherman Williams, was a native of that town and county, and followed farming there till his death, which occurred in November, 1857. Our present subject spent his summers at farming and winters at teaching, till he was 28 years old; in 1857, he came to Wisconsin, purchased a farm of 161 acres on Sec. 27, in the town of Summit, Waukesha Co., to which he, with his father, expected to remove at once, but the death of the latter prevented his return to Wisconsin for two years. He was married in 1857, to Lucy C. Beach, with whom he came to Wisconsin in 1859; in August, 1869, his wife died, leaving three children, Esther, Amanda and Mary. Mr. Williams was town Superintendent of schools in 1862; he has been a member of the Town Board for three years; Chairman of the same for two years; Town Clerk eleven years; Assessor one year; Census enumerator for three terms, 1865, 1875 and 1880; Justice of the Peace in his town for twelve years, and Secretary and Treasurer of the town Insurance Company since its organization in 1874. His second marriage was June 11, 1879, to Lovina, daughter of O. W. Thornton, town of Medina, Dane Co., Wis.


JOHN WILLIAMS, farmer, Sec. 23, 148 acres; P. O. Summit; was born in Cardiganshire, South Wales, in 1815; he is the son of John and Elizabeth Williams, with whom he spent his time at farming till 1841, when he was married to Catharine Jones; May 31, 1847, they sailed for America; landed at Quebec July 29 following; August 11, they reached Milwaukee, and the 15th day of the same month, they came to the tow of Genesee, Waukesha County, and on the 7th day of October of that year settled on Sec. 29, town of Ottawa, where he made his home till 1859, when he removed to the town of Sullivan, Jefferson Co., and ten years later, came to his present home in the tow of Summit; Mrs. Williams died in 1866; his second marriage was in 1867, to Martha, daughter of John and Elizabeth Williams, a native of Wales, and emigrated to Wisconsin with her parents in 1854; her first marriage was to John R. Williams, who died in Milwaukee in 1861, leaving her with two children-John R. and Margaret.


ROBERT WILLIAMS, farmer, Sec 36; P. O. Waterville; was born in Caernarvonshire, North Wales, October 1816; he emigrated to America in 1846, and located in the town of Genesee, Waukesha Co., Wis., where he followed farming till 1873; he then bought his present farm of 220 acres in the town of Summit. He was married in Caernarvonshire, Wales, in 1840, to Sidney Jones; their children are Sydney, now the wife of Robert Edwards, of the town of Delafield, Waukesha Co.; Catharine and Jane at home; the above three were born in Wales; John, Ann and Owen born in Wisconsin and now at home.